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L I B HAHY 

OF THE 

UNIVERSITY 

Of ILLINOIS 

c- 

IZc4Ehi 
1927-41 



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Latest Date stamped below 



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L161— O-1096 







UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 



DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY 



Developments During the Period 1927-1941 

Publications of the Department 

Courses of Study 

Faculty 

Doctor of Philosophy Degrees in Chemistry 




PUBLISHED BY THE UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS, URBANA 

1941 



UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 



DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY 



Developments During the Period 1927-1941 

Publications of the Department 

Courses of Study 

Faculty 

Doctor of Philosophy Degrees in Chemistry 



PUBLISHED BY THE UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS, URBANA 

1941 



UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

Members Ex Officio 

Dwight H. Green, Governor of Illinois Springfield 

John A. Wieland, Superintendent of Public Instruction Springfield 

Elected Members 

(Term 1937-1943) 

Homer Mat Adams 704 W. Vine Street, Springfield 

James M. Cleary 310 S. Michigan Avenue, Chicago 

Chester R. Davis 69 W. Washington Street, Chicago 

(Term 1939-1945) 

Frank A. Jensen LaSalle 

Orville M. Karraker 405 Centennial Building, Springfield 

Dr. Karl A. Meyer Cook County Hospital, Chicago 

(Term 1941-1947) 

John R. Fornof 122 S. Bloomington Street, Streator 

Mrs. Helen M. Grigsby Pittsfield 

Park Livingston 20 N. Wacker Drive, Chicago 

Officers of the Board 

James M. Cleary, President Chicago 

Harrison E. Cunningham, Secretary Urbana 

Frank M. Gordon, Treasurer First National Bank, Chicago 

Lloyd Morey, Comptroller Urbana 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

Arthur Cutts Willard, B.S., D.Eng., LL.D., President of the University 

Albert James Harno, B.S., LL.B., LL.D., Provost of the University 

Robert Daniel Carmichael, Ph.D., Dean of the Graduate School 

Fred Harold Turner, Ph.D., Dean of Men 

Maria Leonard, A.M., Litt.D., Dean of Women 

George Philip Tuttle, B.S., Registrar 



EL 



CONTENTS 

PAGE 

William Albert Noyes 5 

Aims of the Chemistry Department 7 

Instructional Staff 9 

Developments in the Chemistry Department, 1926-1941 . 27 

Organizations 46 

Chemistry and Chemical Engineering Curricula ... 49 

Courses Offered by the Department of Chemistry, 

1940-1941 . 52 

Scientific Publications 61 

Doctor of Philosophy Degrees in Chemistry .... 145 



I 1 87342 




PHOTOGRAPH BY PROF. D. B. KEYES 

William Albert Noyes 

Professor of Chemistry, Emeritus 

Director of the Chemical Laboratory, Retired 

A.B., B.S., 1879, A.M., 1882, Grinnell College; Ph.D., 1882, Johns Hopkins 
University; Munich University, 1889; LL.D., 1909, Clark Universitv ; Chem.D., 
1920, University of Pittsburgh; Sc.D., 1929, Grinnell College 



WILLIAM ALBERT NOYES 

Professor William Albert Noyes was born in Iowa and was edu- 
cated at Grinnell College, the Johns Hopkins University and the Uni- 
versity of Munich. Before coming to the University of Illinois, he 
taught at Grinnell College, the University of Minnesota, the University 
of Tennessee and the Rose Polytechnic Institute. For four years, just 
preceding his work at Illinois, he was chief chemist at the Bureau of 
Standards. 

Professor Noyes came to the University of Illinois as head of the 
Department of Chemistry in 1907 and continued in that capacity until 
1926 when he became professor emeritus. Under his inspiring leader- 
ship the Department grew greatly in size and acquired an international 
reputation. 

In addition to his work in the Department, Professor Noyes found 
time for many other activities. It would be difficult, for example, to 
find anyone who has done as much as he for the American Chemical 
Society. He founded Chemical Abstracts and was its editor from 
1907 to 1909. He was editor of the Society's Journal from 1902 to 
1917 and was president of the Society in 1920. At the present time he 
is an associate editor of the Journal and a member of the board of 
editors of the Scientific Monographs of the American Chemical Society. 
He was editor of Chemical Reviews from 1924 to 1926. 

Besides this vast amount of editorial work; Professor Noyes found 
time to write several books and a very large number of articles. His 
writings embrace not only all fields of chemistry but religion, philoso- 
phy, and international affairs as well. 

Professor Noyes was awarded the Nichols Medal in 1908, the 
Gibbs Medal in 1920, and the Priestly Medal in 1935. He holds honor- 
ary degrees from the Clark University and the University of Pitts- 
burgh. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and 
Sciences, the American Philosophical Society and the National Acad- 
emy of Sciences. 

The great esteem in which Professor Noyes is held was symbolized 
permanently when in 1939 the chemistry building was dedicated to 
him. Of the many tributes that have been paid to Professor Noyes 
one of the most impressive was a dinner held in his honor by his 
colleagues at the time of his eightieth birthday, November 5, 1937. On 
that occasion he was presented a parchment signed by the members 
of the teaching staff. It is reproduced on the next page. 



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AIMS OF THE CHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT 

By Professor Roger Adams 

The constant flow of new applications of chemistry into almost 
every industry and the enormous increase in the number of important 
chemical discoveries in recent years have brought about a rapid de- 
velopment of chemistry and chemical engineering in the United States. 
This has induced gradual changes in the methods of training chemists. 
It is no longer possible or desirable for the undergraduate student in 
his limited training period to devote his energies to gaining specific 
information and techniques which he can apply immediately upon ac- 
ceptance of an industrial position. Courses designed for such purposes 
have been eliminated from the curricula. The present required course 
offerings are planned to train the undergraduate student in the funda- 
mentals of the various branches of chemistry, to aid him in acquiring 
knowledge which is difficult for him to obtain by himself, to provide 
him with those laboratory experiences which are generally applicable, 
and to inspire him to fit himself by independent study for increasing 
responsibilities in the work of his choice. Every effort is made to teach 
the student to recognize his limitations and to crave extension of his 
information. 

Restriction of the enrollment of undergraduate students specializing 
in chemistry and chemical engineering to those who can maintain a 3.5 
average has resulted in the elimination of many who are not fitted by 
native ability or personal inclination to pursue studies in these fields. 
Their chances of succeeding in chemistry are slight. The successful 
chemist must live his profession and find greater pleasure in his work 
than in anything else that he does. 

The capable undergraduate is encouraged to continue in a Graduate 
School. In the undergraduate chemical training of today, the student 
can only be introduced to the more significant theories and practices 
of the science. To become a research chemist, capable of undertaking 
independent investigation, an individual must devote several additional 
years to furthering his knowledge and experience. Graduate study is 
becoming more and more essential as the industries learn to recognize 
the potentialities of men with this training. Although graduate courses 
are more specialized than undergraduate, the stress is not laid upon 
training for specific industries, but upon giving the student a broad 
view of the fundamentals of chemistry so that he will think chemistry 
and develop originality. Above all, the prime objectives of graduate 
study are to teach the student how to attack a research problem and 
how to overcome or circumvent the many difficulties encountered in 



8 University of Illinois 



original work. Upon completion of the requirements for the Ph.D. 
degree, he is qualified either to accept a research position in any in- 
dustry requiring an investigator in his field of chemistry or to embark 
upon a University teaching and research career. 

Besides the training of undergraduate and graduate chemists, the 
Chemistry Department plays an important role in the education of 
thousands of students who need some knowledge of chemistry for 
work in engineering, agriculture, ceramics, home economics, biology, 
medicine or for a general education. Courses designed for training 
these different types of students have been organized. 

The Chemistry Department is fortunate in having on the campus 
in Urbana the State Geological Survey and the U. S. Soy Bean Labo- 
ratory, both of which have efficient chemical sections. Their members 
and those of the Chemistry Department are in close cooperation and 
exchange information. 

Effective teaching and investigation in inorganic, analytical, physi- 
cal, and organic chemistry and in biochemistry, chemical engineering 
and sanitary chemistry have been maintained by the Chemistry Depart- 
ment and will be continued in the future. Only so long as this is 
possible can the Department offer the student, not merely a broad 
training, but one in which he may acquire a proper perspective of the 
various subjects which are coordinated into the science of chemistry. 



STAFF OF THE 

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 

1940-1941 




Roger Adams 

Professor of Organic Chemistry and Head of the 

Department of Chemistry 

A.B., 1909, A.M., 1910, Ph.D., 1912, Harvard University; Sc.D., 1935, Polytechnic 

Institute, Brooklyn 



Department of Chemistry 



11 



William Cumming Rose 
Professor of Biochemistry 
B.S., 1907, Davidson College; Ph.D., 



1911, 



Yale University; Studied 1913, Frei- 
berg University 



Arthur Moses Buswell 

Professor of Chemistry and Chief of the 
State Water Survey 

A.B., 1910, University of Minnesota ; A.M., 
1912, University of Maine; Ph.D., 1917, 
Columbia University 



B Smith Hopkins 

Professor of Inorganic Chemistry 

A.B., 1896, A.M., 1897, Albion College; 
Ph.D., 1906, Johns Hopkins Univer- 
sity; Sc.D., 1926, Albion College; 
LL.D., 1940, Carroll College 



Worth Huff Rodebush 

Professor of Physical Chemistry 

A.B., 1912, A.M., 1914, Kansas University; 
Ph.D., 1917, University of California 





12 



University of Illinois 





Donald Babcock Keyes 

Professor of Chemical Engineering 

B.S., 1913, University of New Hampshire; 
A.M., 1914, Columbia University; 
Ph.D., 1917, University of California 



George Lindenberg Clark 

Professor of Chemistry 

A.B., 1914, De Pauw University; M.S., 1914, 
Ph.D., 1918, University of Chicago; 
Sc.D., 1937, De Pauw University 



^**» *&, 







Carl Shipp Marvel 

Professor of Organic Chemistry 

A.B., 1915, Illinois Wesleyan University; 
A.M., 1916, Ph.D., 1920, University of 
Illinois 



*-. 




Reynold Clayton Fuson 

Professor of Organic Chemistry 

A.B., 1920, University of Montana 
1921, University of California; 
1924, University of Minnesota 



A.M. 
Ph.D. 



Department of Chemistry 



13 



Ralph Lloyd Shriner 

Professor of Organic Chemistry 

B.S., 1921, Washington University, (St. 



Louis); M.S., 1923, 
versity of Illinois 



Ph.D., 1925, Uni- 




Wftt **& * 



Thomas Erwin Phipps 

Professor of Physical Chemistry 

A.B., 1915, A.M., 1916, University of Texas ; 
Ph.D., 1921, University of California 



Henry Fraser Johnstone 

Professor of Chemical Engineering 

B.S., 1923, University of the South; M.S., 
1925, Ph.D., 1926, State University of 
Iowa 



George Frederick Smith 

Professor of Chemistry 

B.S, 1917, M.S., 1919, Ph.D., 1922, Univer- 
sity of Michigan 






14 



University of Illinois 




, 






John Henry Reedy 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 

A.B., A.M., 1900, Southwestern University 
(Texas); M.S., 1914, University of 
Chicago; Ph.D., 1915, Yale University 



Duane Taylor Englis 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 

A.B., 1912, Eureka College; Ph.D., 1916, 
University of Illinois 



Frederick Guy Straub 

Special Research Associate Professor of 
Chemical Engineering 

B.S., 1920, University of Illinois; M.S., 



1923, Met. Eng., 
State College 



1928, Pennsylvania 



Sherlock Swann, Jr. 

Research Associate Professor of Chemi- 
cal Engineering 

B.S., 1922, Princeton University; Ph.D., 
1926, Johns Hopkins University 



Department of Chemistry 



15 



Ludwig Frederick Audrieth 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., 1922, Colgate University; Ph.D. 
1926, Cornell University 



John Christian Bailar, Jr. 

Associate Professor of Chemistry, Sec- 
retary of the Department of Chem- 
istry 

A.B., 1924, A.M., 1925, University of Colo- 
rado ; Ph.D., 1928, University of Michi- 
gan 



Edward Walter Comings 

Assistant Professor of Chemical Engi- 
neering 

B.S., 1930, University of Illinois; Sc.D., 
1934, Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology 



Herbert Edmund Carter 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

A.B., 1930, De Pauw University; A.M., 
1931, Ph.D., 1934, University of Illinois 




f 







16 



University of Illinois 





Arden Garrell Deem 

Assistant Professor of Chemical Engi- 
neering 

B.S., 1931, Ph.D, 1934, University of Illinois 



Virginia Bartow 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

A.B., 1918, Vassar College; A.M., 1921, 
Ph.D., 1923, University of Illinois 



Rosalie Mary Parr 

Associate in Chemistry 

B.A., 1906, A.M., 1911, Ph.D., 1916, Uni- 
versity of Illinois 



Douglas Gillison Nicholson 

Associate in Chemistry 

B.S., 1930, M.S., 1931, Ph.D., 1934, Uni- 
versity of Illinois 



Department of Chemistry 17 



Charles Coale Price, III 

Associate in Chemistry 

A.B., 1934, Swarthmore College; A.M., 
1935, Ph.D., 1936, Harvard University 



Harold Ray Snyder 

Associate in Chemistry 

B.S., 1931, University of Illinois; Ph.D., 
1935, Cornell University 



Frederick Theodore Wall 

Associate in Chemistry 

B.Chem., 1933, Ph.D., 1937, University of 
Minnesota 



Robert Cummins Gore 

Instructor and Special Research Assist- 
ant in Chemistry 

A.B., 1929, Evansville College; A.M., 1930, 
Ph.D., 1933, Indiana University 



-s&maam 



*\ 



■y i» 







18 



University of Illinois 




&*" ^^P* 




William Stevenson Emerson 

Instructor in Chemistry 

A.B, 1934, Dartmouth College; Ph.D., 1937, 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology 



Siegfried Theodore Gross 

Instructor in Chemistry 

A.B, 1933, Colorado College; M.S., 1935, 
California Institute of Technology; 
Ph.D., 1938, University of Illinois 



Carl Swenson Vestling 

Instructor in Chemistry 

A.B, 1934, Carleton College; Ph.D., 1938, 
Johns Hopkins University 



Charles Roland Eddy 

Instructor in Chemistry 

B.S, 1935, Brown University; Ph.D., 1938, 
University of Illinois 



Department of Chemistry 



19 



zm mst *?■ 



Wilbert August Taebel 

Instructor in Chemistry 

B.S., 1935, Elmhurst College; M.S., 1936, 
Ph.D., 1938, University of Illinois 



Arthur Steadman Roe 

Instructor in Chemistry 

B.A, 1933, Oberlin College; M.A., 1935, 
Colorado College; Ph.D., 1938, North- 
western University 



Frank Bonnell Schirmer, Jr. 

Instructor in Chemistry 

B.S., 1934, Clemson College; Ph.D. 
Cornell University 



1939, 



George T herald Moeller 

Instructor in Chemistry 

B.S., 1934, Oregon State College; Ph.D., 
1938, University of Wisconsin 




20 University of Illinois 




Herbert August Laitinen 

Instructor in Chemistry 

B.Chem., 1936, Ph.D., 1940, University of 
Minnesota 



ASSISTANTS IN CHEMISTRY 

Alfred Angelo Albert, Assistant in Chemistry 

B.S., 1938, Pennsylvania State College 
Paul Anders, Assistant in Glassblowing 
Leonard James Armstrong, Assistant in Chemistry 

A.B, 1937, St. Olaf's College; M.S., 1939, North Dakota Agricultural College 
Philip Schaffner Baker, Assistant in Chemistry (Second semester) 

A.B., 1938, De Pauw University ; M.A., 1939, University of Arkansas 
Fred Wendell Banes, Assistant in Chemistry 

B.Ed., 1940, Southern Illinois State Normal University 
Augustus Laurence Barker, Jr., Assistant in Chemistry 

A.B, 1940, Ripon College 
Fred Basolo, Assistant in Chemistry 

B.Ed, 1940, Southern Illinois State Normal University 
Stanford William Briggs, Assistant in Chemical Engineering (First 
semester) 

B.S, 1937, California Institute of Technology; M.S., 1938, University of 
Illinois 
Lester Allen Brooks, Assistant in Organic Chemical Manufactures 

S.B, 1935, Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
Donald Eugene Burney, Assistant in Chemistry (First semester) 

A.B, 1937, University of South Dakota 
George Wesley Cannon, Assistant in Chemistry 

A.B, 1939, Dakota Wesleyan University; M.S, 1941, University of Illinois 
Richard Golden Chase, Assistant in Chemistry 

A.B, 1938, A.M., 1940, Dartmouth College 
John Terrell Clapp, Jr., Assistant in Chemistry 

B.S, 1933, Purdue University; M.S, 1940, University of Illinois 
Leallyn Burr Clapp, Assistant in Chemistry 

B.Ed, 1935, Eastern Illinois Teachers College; A.M., 1939, University 'of 
Illinois 
Harry Cohen, Assistant in Chemical Engineering (Second semester) 

B.S, 1940, University of Illinois 
James Oliver Corner, Jr., Assistant in Chemistry 

A. B, 1939, Dartmouth College ; A.M., 1940, University of Illinois 
John Raymond Cummings, Assistant in Chemistry (First semester) 

A.B, 1937, Marshall College 
John Raymond Elliott, Assistant in Chemistry 

B.S, 1937, Iowa State College 



Department of Chemistry 21 

Robert Wilson Eyler, Assistant in Chemistry 

B.S., 1940, Monmouth College 
Harold Alvin Fiess, Assistant in Chemistry (First semester) 

B.S., 1939, Wheaton College 
Herbert Fineberg, Assistant in Chemistry 

B.S., 1935, Trinity College 
Robert Everett Foster, Assistant in Chemistry 

A.B., 1940, Miami University 
William Dean Fraser, Assistant in Organic Chemical Manufactures 

B.S., 1938, Harvard University; M.S., 1939, University of Illinois 
John Douglas Garber, Assistant in Chemistry 

B.S., 1940, Pennsylvania State College 
Francis James Glick, Assistant in Chemistry 

A.B., 1939, De Pauw University 
William Joseph Gross, Assistant in Chemistry 

B.S., 1938, St. Joseph's College 
Frederick Grosser, Jr., Assistant in Chemistry 

B.S., 1937, Wheaton College 
Robert Curtiss Gunther, Assistant in Chemistry 

A.B., 1938, Knox College ; M.S., 1939, University of Illinois 
Richard George Handrick, Assistant in Chemistry 

B.Chem., 1937, Cornell University; M.S., 1939, University of Illinois 
James Harkema, Assistant in Chemistry 

A.B., 1937, Calvin College 
Delton William Hein, Assistant in Chemistry 

B.A., 1939, University of South Dakota; M.S., 1941, University of Illinois 
Orvtlle Farrow Hill, Assistant in Chemistry 

B.S., 1940, James Millikin University 
Chester Mora Himel, Assistant in Chemistry 

B.S., 1938, University of Chicago ; M.S., 1939, University of Illinois 
Wendell Levern Holt, Assistant in Chemistry 

B.S., 1938, Bethany College ; M.S., 1940, Utah State Agricultural College 
Clarence Frederick Huber, Assistant in Chemistry 

A.B., 1938, Wabash College 
Adolph Robert Jensen, Assistant in Chemistry 

B.S., 1937, Wheaton College; M.S., 1940, University of Illinois 
Philip Colony Johnson, Assistant in Chemical Engineering 

B.S., 1940, University of New Hampshire 
Julius Frank Kaplan, Assistant in Organic Chemical Manufactures 
(First semester) 

B.S., 1937, University of Illinois 
Russell John Keirs, Assistant in Chemistry 

B.S., 1937, M.S., 1938, Ph.D., 1941, University of Illinois 
Clifford Richard Keizer, Assistant in Chemistry 

A.B., 1939, Hope College; M.S., 1941, University of Illinois 
Robert Warren Kell, Assistant in Organic Chemical Manufactures 

B.Ed., 1937, Southern Illinois State Normal University; M.S., 1938, Univer- 
sity of Illinois 
Stanton Coit Kelton, Jr., Assistant in Chemistry 

B.Sc, 1937, Harvard University 
Stanley Felix Kern, Assistant in Chemistry 

B.S., 1937, College of St. Thomas 
Glenn Ansel Kidder, Assistant in Chemistry 

A.B., 1939, University of Illinois 
Joseph Wayne Kneisley, Assistant in Chemistry 

A.B., 1939, Miami University 
John Herbert Ladd, Assistant in Chemistry 

B.S., 1940, University of Illinois 



22 University of Illinois 



Anthony Hamilton Land, Assistant in Chemistry 

B.S., 1936, University of Kentucky 
William Monding Langdon, Assistant in Chemical Engineering 

B.S., 1935, M.S., 1939, University of Illinois 
Robert Louis Le Tourneau, Assistant in Chemistry 

B.S., 1939, Wheaton College; M.S., 1940, Akron University 
John Lee Marsh, Assistant in Chemistry 

B.S., 1938, University of Rochester 
Mrs. Russell Leslie Maycock, Assistant in Chemistry 

A.B., 1938, Vassar College ; M.S., 1940, University of Illinois 
Blaine Chase McKusick, Assistant in Chemistry 

B.Chem.E., 1940, University of Minnesota 
Lloyd Richard Michels, Assistant in Chemical Engineering 

B.Chem., 1938, University of California ; M.S., 1940, University of Illinois 
Thomas Peter Moundres, Assistant in Chemistry 

B.S., 1938, University of Illinois 
Lawrence Arthur Patterson, Assistant in Chemistry 

B.S., 1937, Montana State College 
George Pish, Assistant in Chemistry 

B.S., 1940, Central Y.M.C.A. College 
Leslie Byron Poland, Assistant in Chemistry 

B.Ed., 1934, Illinois State Normal University; M.S., 1935, University of 
Illinois 
Mary Louise Quaife, Assistant in Chemistry (Second semester) 

A.B., 1938, M.S., 1939, University of Michigan 
Albert Israel Rachlin, Assistant in Chemistry 

B.S., 1937, Brown University 
Betty Rapp, Assistant in Chemistry 

B.S., 1935, M.S., 1937, University of Toledo 
James Adolph Robertson, Assistant in Chemistry 

A.B., 1937, Park College; M.S., 1939, University of Oklahoma 
John Cutler Robinson, Jr., Assistant in Organic Chemical Manufactures 

B.S., 1939, Boston University 
Stanley Paul Rowland, Assistant in Chemistry 

B.Chem., 1938, University of Minnesota 
Frank McLeran Rugg, Assistant in Chemistry (First semester) 

A.B., 1933, Mississippi College ; M.S., 1935, Louisiana State University 
Herman Julian Sampson, Assistant in Chemistry 

A.B., 1940, Augustana College 
Glenwood Louis Schertz, Assistant in Chemistry (Second semester) 

B.S., 1934, M.S., 1938, University of Illinois 
Gerald William Sears, Assistant in Chemistrv 

B.S., 1938, University of Illinois 
John William Shackleton, Assistant in Chemistry (First semester) 

A.B., 1932, M.S., 1933, Vanderbilt University 
William Henry Sharkey, Assistant in Chemistry 

B.S., 1937, Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechanical College 
Herbert Silcox, Assistant in Chemical Engineering 

B.S., 1936, M.S., 1939, University of New Hampshire 
Douglas Arvid Skoog, Assistant in Chemistrv 

B.S., 1940, Oregon State College 
Curtis William Smith, Assistant in Chemistry 

B.Ed., 1940, Southern Illinois State Normal University 
Quentin Francis Soper, Assistant in Chemistry 

B.Chem., 1940, University of Minnesota 
Fred Walter Spangler, Assistant in Chemistry 

A.B., 1940, Carthage College 



Department of Chemistry 23 

Arch Byron Spradling, Jr., Assistant in Chemistry 

A.B, 1940, Grinnell College 
Robert Steinman, Assistant in Chemistry 

B.S., 1939, Carnegie Institute of Technology; M.S., 1940, University of 
Illinois 
Robert Whisman Stephenson, Assistant in Chemistry 

A.B., 1938, Indiana University 
William Henry Taylor, Assistant in Chemistry (First semester) 

B.S., 1937, University of Wisconsin 
Clement Walter Theobald, Assistant in Chemistry 

A.B., 1939, A.M., 1940, University of Nebraska 
Robert Jerome Thorn, Assistant in Chemistry 

B.S., 1938, Alma College 
Robert Sites Voris, Assistant in Chemistry 

B.S., 1940, Pennsylvania State College 
William Eldred Wallace, Assistant in Chemistry 

B.S., 1940, University of Wichita 
Maurice Leslie Ward, Assistant in Chemistry 

A.B., 1938, University of Illinois 
Eldred Welch, Assistant in Chemistry 

B.Ed., 1937, Southern Illinois State Normal University; M.S., 1939, Univer- 
sity of Illinois 
Lynwood Nelson Whitehill, Assistant in Chemistry (First semester) 

A.B., 1935, M.A., 1937, Dartmouth College 
John Walter Whitson, Jr., Assistant in Chemistry 

B.S., 1939, Beloit College; M.S., 1941, University of Illinois 
Joseph Marion Wilkinson, Assistant in Chemistry 

B.Ed., 1938, Southern Illinois State Normal University; M.S., 1940, Univer- 
sity of Illinois 
Michael Witte, Assistant in Chemistry (First semester) 

B.S., 1937, Loyola University (Chicago) 
Frank James Wolf, Assistant in Chemistry 

A.B., 1938, Miami University 
John Langdon Woolsey, Assistant in Chemistry 

B.S., 1940, Southwestern 
Joe Boehm Work, Assistant in Chemistry 

A.B., 1938, Wittenberg College; M.S., 1940, University of Illinois 
Flavtus Webb Wyman, Assistant in Chemistry 

B.S., 1937, Murray State Teachers College; M.S., 1939, University of 
Kentucky 
Victor Anthony Yarborough, Assistant in Chemistry 

A.B., 1939, Sioux Falls College 
Henry Yuska, Assistant in Chemistry (Second semester) 

B.S., 1935, College of the City of New York; M.S., 1939, Brooklyn Poly- 
technic Institute 

POST DOCTORATE RESEARCH ASSISTANTS 
AND FELLOWS 

Donald James Byers, Du Pont Special Research Assistant 

B.S., 1936, Iowa State College ; Ph.D., 1940, University of Minnesota 
Cornelius Kennady Cain, Special Research Assistant 

B.S., 1932, University of Kentucky; M.S., 1937, Massachusetts State College; 
Ph.D., 1939, Johns Hopkins University 
Marvin Carmack, Special Research Assistant 

A.B., 1937, University of Illinois; Ph.D., 1940, University of Michigan 
Frederick Robert Duke, Research Assistant 

B.A., 1937, University of South Dakota; Ph.D., 1940, University of Illinois 



24 University of Illinois 



Robert Loeffler Frank, Du Pont Special Research Assistant 

A.B, 1936, Dartmouth College; M.A., 1938, Ph.D., 1940, University of 
Wisconsin 
Emanuel Ginsberg, Research Assistant 

B.S., 1936, New York University; M.S., 1937, Ph.D., 1940, University of 
Illinois 
Charles E. Holley, Jr., Research Assistant 

A.B., 1937, Ph.D., 1940, University of Illinois 
Warren Douglas McPhee, Special Research Assistant 

B.S., 1937, Boston University; Ph.D., 1940, Northwestern University 
Edward Arthur Parker, Special Research Associate in Chemical Engi- 
neering 

B.S., 1930, M.S., 1932, Ph.D., 1937, University of Illinois 
Eldon Emerson Rice, Rockefeller Foundation Special Research Assistant 

A.B., 1934, De Pauw University; M.S., 1936, Ph.D., 1938, University of 
Illinois 
Paul Gordon Roach, Research Assistant 

B.S., 1936, Indiana University; Ph.D., 1940, University of Illinois 
Virgil Richard Sullivan, Research Assistant 

B.S., 1921, M.S., 1936, Ph.D., 1940, University of Illinois 
Stanley Wawzonek, National Research Council Fellow 

Sc.B., 1935, Brown University; Ph.D., 1939, University of Minnesota 
Madelyn Womack, Rockefeller Foundation Special Research Assistant 

B.S., 1931, Texas State College for Women; M.S., 1933, Ph.D., 1935, Uni- 
versity of Illinois 

GRADUATE RESEARCH ASSISTANTS 

Peter Michael Bernays, National Lime Association Research Assistant 

B.S., 1939, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; M.S., 1940, University 
of Illinois 
Robert J. Corruccini, Research Assistant 

A.B., 1938, Reed College; A.M., 1940, Oregon State College 
Jack Joe Denton, Research Assistant 

B.S., 1937, Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechanical College 
Bernard Fred Dudenbostel, Jr., Research Assistant 

B.S., 1938, University of Illinois 
Salvatore George Gallo, Continental Oil Company Research Assistant 

A.B., 1940, Oberlin College 
William Joseph Haines, Rockefeller Foundation Special Research Assistant 

A.B., 1940, Wabash College 
Robert Hall Hasek, Research Assistant 

B.S., 1939, Pennsylvania State College 
Julius Earl Johnson, Rockefeller Foundation Special Research Assistant 

A.B., 1939, University of Colorado 
Charles Frederick Kade, Rockefeller Foundation Special Research 
Assistant 

A.B., 1936, Carleton College ; M.S., 1938, North Dakota Agricultural College 
Ivar Trygve Krohn, Rockefeller Foundation Special Research Assistant 

B.Chem., 1937, University of Minnesota 
Glenn Frederick Lambert, Rockefeller Foundation Special Research As- 
sistant 

A.B., 1940, De Pauw University 
Birtill A. Lloyd, Research Assistant 

B.S., 1930, University of Illinois ; M.A., 1934, University of Toronto 
Russel Leslie Maycock, Rockefeller Foundation Special Research As- 
sistant 

B.S., 1935, University of California 
Bertrand Jesse Mayland, Research Assistant in Chemical Engineering 

B.Chem. E., 1940, University of Wisconsin 



Department of Chemistry 25 

John Warren Meier, Research Assistant 

B.S., 1938, University of Wisconsin 
Jesse Bernard Patberg, Rockefeller Foundation Special Research Assistant 

A.B., 1938, Evansville College 
Robert Lamarr Pigford, Research Assistant in Chemical Engineering 

B.S., 1938, Mississippi State College; M.S., 1940, University of Illinois 
Norman Rabjohn, Rohm and Haas Research Assistant 

B.S., 1937, University of Rochester; M.S., 1939, University of Illinois 
William Holley Rieger, Research Assistant 

A.B., 1937, University of Louisville 
Edgar Drummond Shippee, Research Assistant 

B.S., 1938, University of Illinois 
Alamjit Dhaliwal Singh, Special Research Assistant in Chemical En- 
gineering 

B.S., 1929, M.S., 1930, University of Illinois 
Philip Lee Southwick, Rohm and Haas Research Assistant 

A.B., 1939, A.M., 1940, University of Nebraska 
Meredith Morgan Sparks, Rockefeller Foundation Special Research As- 
sistant 

A.B, 1938, M.A., 1940, Rice Institute 
John Staley, Special Research Assistant in Chemical Engineering (First 
semester) 

B.S., 1940, Purdue University 
William Henry Taylor, Research Assistant (Second semester) 

B.S., 1937, University of Wisconsin 
Donald Theodore Warner, Rockefeller Foundation Special Research 
Assistant 

A.B., 1939, Hope College 
Harold Carl Weingartner, Research Assistant 

B.S., 1939, M.S., 1940, University of Illinois 
Warren Edgar Winsche, Research Assistant in Chemical Engineering 

B.Chem., 1939, Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn; M.S., 1940, University of 
Rochester 

FELLOWS 
Marvin Douglas Armstrong 

B.S., 1938, University of South Carolina; M.S., 1939, University of Illinois 
Lyda McClellan Arnett, Jr. 

B.S., 1936, West Virginia Wesleyan College; M.S., 1938, West Virginia 
University 
Lyell Christian Behr 

B.Chem., 1937, University of Minnesota 
Edward John Bicek 

A.B., 1937, Carleton College 
Edmond Milton Bottorff 

A.B., 1937, Hanover College 
Giffin Denison Jones 

B.S., 1939, University of Wisconsin 
Carl Bernard Kretschmer 

A.B., 1938, University of Colorado 
Wilmer Ray Manning 

B.E., 1939, Tulane University 
Robert Bruce Moffett 

A.B., 1937, Hanover College; A.M., 1939, University of Illinois 
Richard Fifield Phillips 

A.B., 1939, Amherst College 
Stanley Brooke Speck 

B.S., 1937, Montana State College 
Carleton Angelo Sperati 

A.B., 1938, Luther College ; A.M., 1939, University of Illinois 



26 University of Illinois 



Carl Mantle Stevens 

A.B., 1937, American University 
Arthur Dock Fon Toy 

B.S., 1939, M.S., 1940, University of Illinois 
Barbara Williamson 

A.B., 1938, Texas State College for Women 
Paul Burke Welldon 

A.B., 1937, A.M., 1939, Dartmouth College 

SCHOLARS 
Max Eugene Chiddix 

B.Ed., 1940, Illinois State Normal University 
Alice Cecilia Hudson 

A.B., 1940, Rosary College 
Royston Murphy Roberts 

A.B., 1940, Austin College 
Charles Richard Russell 

B.S., 1940, Monmouth College 

OPERATIVE STAFF 

Edna Virginia Evans (Mrs.), Executive Clerk of the Department and Secre- 
tary to the Head of the Department 

Carl Frederic Miller, Head Clerk 

Lewis George Fauble, B.S., 1939, University of Illinois; Microanalyst 

Mary Sevier Kreger, A.B., 1939, Vassar College; M.S., 1940, University of 
Illinois ; Assistant in Microanalysis 

Arthur Edward Wood, Mechanician 

Clyde W. Powers, Machinist 

George Allen Pittman, Mechanical Assistant 

Ruth Elaine Wood, Departmental Stenographer 

Blanche Elizabeth Lautz, Departmental Stenographer 

Milena Jandasek, Departmental Stenographer 

Judith Rose Wisnaski, Departmental Stenographer 

Mary Eugenia Welch (Mrs.), Departmental Stenographer 

Thomas Peel, Storekeeper (Retired) 

Forrest Mock, Storekeeper 

Marvin Thomas Murrell, Laboratory Storekeeper 

Clifford Edward Dalton, Laboratory Storekeeper 

Luther Earl Tillotson, Laboratory Storekeeper 

Lowell Sinclair Kirby, Laboratory Storekeeper 

Clyde Morgan Scott, Laboratory Storekeeper 

Elisha Nelson Genung, Laboratory Storekeeper 

Claude Beckham Dunn, Laboratory Helper 

Stanley Arthur Phillips, Laboratory Helper 

Lawrence Edward Bailey, Laboratory Helper 

Florence Alexander, Laboratory Helper 

Verle Walters, Laboratory Helper 

STAFF OF THE CHEMICAL STORE 

Justa Morris Lindgren, A.B., 1902, A.M., 1907, University of Illinois, Super- 
visor, Technical Analyst 
William Lee Bennett, A.B., 1902, University of Illinois, Stock Record Clerk 
Charles Crittenden Crawford, Storekeeper 



DEVELOPMENTS IN THE CHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 

1926-1941 

By Virginia Bartow 

Three booklets describing the work of the University of Illinois 
Chemistry Department have been issued. The first, a small handbook, 
was printed in 1907. The second, a bulletin largely written by Pro- 
fessor Samuel Parr, and appearing in 1916, was in more detail and 
contained a history of chemistry at Illinois from the founding of the 
University to that date. In the third, which appeared in 1927, Professor 
G. D. Beal summarized the historical material for the decade 1916-1926. 

As fifteen years have elapsed since the last booklet was issued, it 
seems fitting to supplement the earlier accounts of the growth and 
progress of chemistry at the University of Illinois, by summarizing 
the records for this recent period, which has been under the excellent 
leadership of Professor Roger Adams. 

THE LABORATORIES 

The chemistry building is now known as the William Albert Noyes 
Chemical Laboratory. It was so designated in 1939 by the authority 
of the Board of Trustees of the University and is the second building 
on the campus to be named for a living man. As evidence that this 
structure was not adequate for the needs of the department, an Annex 
was built to the south and attached to the old Agricultural Building. 
This additional laboratory was designed for and has continued to house 
freshman and sophomore courses. The Annex contains offices, class- 
rooms, and a lecture room which has one hundred seventy- four seats. 
The large laboratories on the first two floors and in the basement can 
accommodate three thousand and twenty-four students in general in- 
organic chemistry. The top floor laboratories have lockers for four 
hundred and eighty-two in Elementary Quantitative Analysis. The 
Annex was opened for class work in February 1931, thirty years fter 
the first half of the main building had been built with the expe^ 
that it would be adequate for twenty-five years. 

Meanwhile the old building has been remodeled to take care 
needs of the upper classmen and the Graduate School. The bas 
is still utilized by the State Water Survey, the shops, and the di 
of Chemical Engineering. The first floor is occupied by the mam 
offices, chemical engineering, and physical chemistry. The entire second 

27 



28 University of Illinois 



floor, with the exception of the library, is devoted to organic chemistry, 
since the analytical chemistry division has moved up to the third floor 
on the west side. Inorganic chemistry shares the east side of the 
third floor with the Department of Bacteriology which, it is hoped, will 
soon be housed in a new building. If the contemplated move on the 
part of bacteriology is made, it will open up an area the size of a floor 
on the Annex. This area will presumably be assigned to chemistry. 
Biochemistry is located on the fourth floor. 

Because it has no ventilation, and because of faulty construction, 
such as wooden beams through the flues, the old half of the main build- 
ing has been a source of concern to the department. In the 1941 Uni- 
versity budget, the legislature granted an appropriation to fireproof and 
repair the west side of the building and rebuild the roof on the east to 
condition the top floor against heat. 

STAFF CHANGES 

The growth of the department is reflected by the increase in the 
number of staff members during the period of 1926 to 1941. In 1926 
there were thirty-three full time appointees, sixty junior staff members, 
ten fellows, six scholars, and nine research assistants. There are at 
present thirty-eight full time teachers, eighty-five junior staff members, 
eighteen University of Illinois Fellows, twelve Fellows paid from out- 
side sources, four University of Illinois Scholars, fourteen special re- 
search assistants who are candidates for the doctorate, three University 
Post-Doctorate Fellows, and four other Post-Doctorate Fellows. 

Of the thirty-three individuals listed on the full time instructional 
staff in 1926, only Professors Noyes, Parr, and Hopkins had served 
continuously for the entire preceding decade. During this period of 
rapid growth and war emergencies, many competent members were 
called elsewhere. Of the thirty-three names listed for 1926-1927, 
eighteen remain on the 1940-1941 list. However, all of the seven men, 
who with Doctor Adams constitute the executive committee of the de- 
partment, are among those eighteen. This has afforded a remarkable 
opportunity to develop policies and to conduct a continuous and well 
coordinated teaching and research program. The continued expansion 
and increased service of the whole has been maintained despite many 
changes among the younger men. Started by Professor Noyes, the 
policy of keeping all divisions well-manned and equipped and on a par 
with one another has been continued by Professor Adams. 

The list of the present staff members need not be repeated here, but 
it is appropriate to mention those who have contributed to the depart- 
ment in this period and who are now elsewhere. They have left Illinois 
to go to other academic institutions, or change to the industrial field. 



Department of Chemistry 



29 



The department is proud to say that the following were at one time 
members of the staff: 

Billman, J. H., 1937-1939 — Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana. 

Braley, S. A., 1917-1927— The Pittsburgh Steel Company, Pittsburgh, Pennsyl- 
vania. 

Copley, M. J., 1929-1939 — Eastern Regional Research Laboratory, United States 
Department of Agriculture, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Cox, G. J., 1925-1929— Mellon Institute of Industrial Research, Pittsburgh, Penn- 
sylvania. 

Driggs, F. H., 1924-1927 — Fansteel Metallurgical Corporation, North Chicago, 
Illinois. 

du Vigneaud, Vincent, 1929-1932 — Cornell University Medical School, New York, 
New York. 

Elder, L. W., Jr., 1927-1930 — General Foods Corporation, Hoboken, New Jersey. 

Glasoe, P. K., 1938-1939 — Eastman Kodak Company, Rochester, New York. 

Howard, F. C, 1926-1936— Haverhill, Massachusetts. 

Johnson, J. R., 1924-1927 — Cornell University, Ithaca, New York. 

Karns, G. M., 1925-1927 — Cellophane Division, Du Pont Rayon Company, Buf- 
falo, New York. 

King, A. J., 1927-1928 — Syracuse University, Syracuse, New York. 

Kistler, S. S., 1931-1935 — Norton Company, Worcester, Massachusetts. 

Kremers, H. C, 1917-1918, 1920-1929— Harshaw Chemical Company, Cleveland, 
Ohio. 

Layng, T. E., 1916-1927 — Container Corporation of America, Chicago, Illinois. 

Madson, W. H., 1931-1933 — Krebs Pigment and Color Corporation, E. I. du 
Pont de Nemours and Company, Inc., Baltimore, Maryland. 

Mertz, E. T., 1937-1938 — University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri. 

Neville, H. A., 1921-1927 — Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. 

Peirce, D. D., 1931-1933 — State Teachers College, Clarion, Pennsylvania. 

Quill, L. L., 1929-1935— Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio. 

Reed, G. H, 1931-1938— Knox College, Galesburg, Illinois. 

Shaw, E. J, 1930-1931— A. B. Dick Company, Chicago, Illinois. 



William Albert Noyes Chemical Laboratory 



PHOTOGRAPH BY MR. C. F. MILLER 




30 University of Illinois 



Seifert, R. L. E., 1937-1938— Alma College, Alma, Michigan. 

Stillwell, C. W., 1930-1933 — Dennison Manufacturing Company, Framingham, 

Massachusetts. 
Symons, G. S., 1932-1933 — Buffalo Sewer Authority, Buffalo, New York. 
Tarvin, Donald, 1933-1934 — General Chemical Company, Long Island City, New 

York. 
Villars, D. S., 1927-1929— U. S. Rubber Products Incorporated, Passaic, New 

Jersey. 
Ward, Roland, 1931-1932 — Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute, Brooklyn, New York. 
Yntema, L. F., 1923-1930— St. Louis University, St. Louis, Missouri. 

During this period only two staff members were lost by death. 
Those two, Professor Samuel Wilson Parr and Miss Marion E. 
Sparks, had given services of very unique and different character. 
Professor Parr, B.S. University of Illinois 1884, died on May 16, 1931, 
five years after his retirement. As an active staff member, he had been 
a very busy man, and was glad to be released from his academic duties 
to devote himself to other pursuits. He spent considerable time at the 
Moline, Illinois, plant where his world famed instruments are made. 
In October, 1927, the new Parr recording gas colorimeter was dis- 
played for the first time. In 1928 he was honored by election to the 
presidency of the American Chemical Society. In 1929 he was given an 
honorary Doctor of Science degree from Illinois College. At the time 
of his death he was expending his energies on the revision of his text 
The Analysis of Fuel, Gas, Water, and Lubricants. Other claims to 
fame came through his work with his various instruments ; with Illium, 
the acid resistant alloy; and with the studies of Illinois coal, which 
have meant much to the state. He was also interested in the University 
Y.M.C.A., the Athletic Association, and the Choral Society. He served 
for a period of thirty-five years on the faculty of the Department of 
Chemistry, from which he had been graduated. His wise guidance and 
friendly counsel were essential factors in the promotion of chemistry 
at Illinois. 

Miss Marion E. Sparks, who had been in charge of the chemistry 
departmental library since 1915, died on February 10, 1929. This 
amazing woman was known to generations of chemists as a person 
devoted to their interests. She had a classical training at the University 
of Illinois, a Master's degree in Romance languages, and a library 
degree. Her memory was so remarkable that she kept in mind the 
chemical material which different staff members and graduate students 
were likely to want. She gladly translated French, German, and Italian 
for them. Through numerous letters and a register which all returning 
chemists signed at Homecoming, she distributed news to the alumni. 
After her death the Association of Illinois Chemists placed a plaque in 
the library under her picture. The simple statement on the bronze 
tablet best expresses the thought of those who knew her — "Dedicated 
to the Memory of Miss Marion E. Sparks by the Illinois Chemists of 
all ages. She was their guide when they sought information, but they 



Department of Chemistry 



31 



remember her best because she remembered them and was their cheer- 
ful mentor, counselor and friend." 

The chemistry department has emphasized both teaching and re- 
search. The student enrollment attests the quality of the teaching, and 
the continuous stream of publications coming from the laboratory 
records the results of research. The attainments of individual mem- 
bers of the department as teachers, consultants, research workers, and 
contributors to the advancement of the chemical profession through 
their activities in national societies or organized committees cannot be 
listed here. Professor Adams has made marked contributions along all 
these lines. As an administrator, he has kept the standards of the de- 
partment at a high level, guided its policies, and selected a staff which 
has made it one of the outstanding groups not only at the University 
of Illinois but in the country. He has made the organic seminar an 
inspiration to students and teachers alike. In spite of heavy responsi- 
bilities, he has directed the research of over twenty graduate students 
each year. During these fifteen years, he has undertaken among pro- 
fessional duties, the following: as fellow of the American Association 
for the Advancement of Science, he was chairman of the chemical 
section in 1927 and member of the executive committee for 1941-1943; 
he was councillor-at-large of the American Chemical Society from 
1926-1929, a director from 1932-1936 and 1941-1943, president elect 
in 1934, and president of the society in 1935. During the past five years 
he has served as a member of the committee on the Professional 
Training of Chemists. He was elected to membership in the National 
Academy of Science in 1929 and has since been a member of the council 
(1931-1934, 1934-1937), of the Government Relations and Science Ad- 



Chemistry Annex 



PHOTOGRAPH BY MR. C. F. MILLER 







- 



' i I'M 



32 University of Illinois 



visory Committee (1935-1939), and Chairman of the Chemical Section 
(1938-1941). He was elected Fellow of the American Academy of 
Arts and Sciences in 1928, member of the American Philosophical 
Society in 1935, Honorary Fellow of the British Chemical Society in 
1938. He was appointed Vice-president for Science for the Farm 
Chemurgic Council 1935, member of the Advisory Board of the 
National Institute of Health 1936-1939, Vice Chairman of the Chemi- 
cal Division of the National Defense Committee 1940, and Chairman 
National Defense Committee of the American Chemical Society 1940. 
Other honors have come in recognition of his scientific research — an 
honorary Ph.D. from Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute in 1935, the W. 
H. Nichols medal in 1927, and the Willard Gibbs medal in 1936. His 
researches have included the discovery and use of plantinum oxide- 
platinum black as a catalyst for hydrogenation of organic molecules, 
synthetic substitutes for chaulmoogric acid with similar bactericidal 
properties, the stereochemistry of biphenyls and aryl olefins — com- 
pounds exhibiting restricted rotation — , aryl amines and related com- 
pounds, organic deuterium compounds, and the determination of the 
structure of the active principles of certain natural products such as 
morindone, emodin, gossypol of the cotton seed, cannabinol and canno- 
bidiol from hemp and current investigations on that large class of alka- 
loids from various species of the genera Senecio and Crotalaria. 

The merit of the research done at Illinois has been recognized by 
the chemists of the country in many ways. During this fifteen year 
period, four of the staff, Professors Adams, Rose, Marvel, and Rode- 
bush, have been elected to the National Academy of Sciences. Pro- 
fessor Noyes had been a member for some time. 

Six more have been added to the starred list in American Men of 
Science, which had five starred in the 1927 edition. The eleven men are 
Professors Adams, Buswell, Clark, Fuson, Hopkins, Keyes, Marvel, 
Noyes, Rodebush, Rose, and Shriner. Three of the members, Pro- 
fessors Adams, Hopkins, and Noyes, are also members of the American 
Philosophical Society. 

THE DIVISIONS OF THE CHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT 

Because all possible material help has been given to the various 
divisions of the department, substantial progress has been made. This 
progress is indicated by a brief resume of the outstanding research 
problems, the accumulation of permanent equipment, and of the sig- 
nificant developments within each division. 

Inorganic Division — Some of the major developments within the 
inorganic laboratory are: 

Under the direction of Professor Hopkins twenty papers have come 
from the notable research on Rare Earths. 



Department of Chemistry 33 

While connected with the department Professor Kremers completed 
some oustanding work on the metallurgy of the Rare Earths, and 
produced a complete collection of the Rare Earth metals. 

Professor Yntema showed that Rare Earths can be separated by 
reduction. This method has been utilized with great advantage by 
other investigators in the field. 

Professor Audrieth has been studying non-aqueous solvents and 
nitrogen chemistry. 

Professor Bailar has specialized in research in inorganic isomerism. 
These investigations have grown into a series of publications relating 
to the stereochemistry of inorganic complex compounds. 

Professor Bartow teaches the course in Chemical Literature 
formerly taught by Miss Sparks; and since 1931 she has taught the 
course in History of Chemistry, which was given by Professor Noyes 
before his retirement. Both courses are required in the Chemistry cur- 
riculum. Professor Bartow also has charge of the semester Survey 
Course in Chemistry. 

Doctor Nicholson has been studying the factors which modify the 
drying of paint films, with special reference to titanium oxide and 
newer inorganic pigments. 

After the Saturday morning Journal Meeting was discontinued, the 
inorganic seminar, along with all the other graduate seminars in the 
department, was further developed to serve as a discussion group for 
study of recent advances in the field. In conjunction with the seminar, 
members of the inorganic division have presented, in rotation, lecture 
and reading courses in special topics of current interest and importance. 
During the past two years a selected group of Freshman Chemical 
Engineers have been given a new general inorganic and qualitative 
analysis course which makes it possible for them to cover that type of 
work in ten instead of thirteen hours. A regulation has just been 
passed that both Freshman Chemists and Chemical Engineers who have 
passed a satisfactory proficiency examination may follow this con- 
densed schedule. 

Two of the inorganic staff have held National Research Fellow- 
ships. Professor Audrieth studied with Paul Walden at Rostock, and 
Dr. L. L. Quill spent a year at Gottingen with V. M. Goldschmidt. 

Analytical Division — The present analytical staff has assembled 
a remarkable collection of permanent equipment for scientific studies. 
The list of significant items is impressive: a medium and a large Bausch 
and Lomb spectrograph, a Leeds and Northrup automatic recording 
photoelectric photometer, a Leitz Ultraphot with all accessories, six 
multiple X-ray diffraction units, an electron diffraction apparatus, spec- 
trophotometers, polarograph, the best modern apparatus for electro- 
metric titrations and electrometric depositions, Geiger-Muller counters 



34 University of Illinois 



for radioactive tracers, and an electron microscope. With this equip- 
ment, the analytical division takes care of the X-ray, spectroscopic, and 
other types of analytical work for other departments of the University. 
With an unusual variety of standard equipment for demonstration and 
practice, Professors Smith and Englis have organized courses in under- 
graduate and graduate instrumental analysis. 

The research carried on by Professor Clark has consisted of X-ray 
studies on metallurgical materials, lead oxides, rubber, textiles, lubri- 
cants, proteins, and other natural materials. Because of successful 
investigations along these lines, he was awarded the Grasselli medal 
in 1932. 

Professor Smith has extended the knowledge and usefulness of the 
perchlorates, dehydration methods, instrumental development, cerate 
oxidimetry and general improvement in quantitative analytical methods. 

Professor Reedy has contributed improvements in macro and micro 
qualitative analytical methods, studies on mechanism and rates of re- 
action, and polymorphism. 

Professor Englis has been concerned with the quantitative estima- 
tion of sugars, the application of instrumental methods to problems 
in food and plant analysis, and the technology of a number of carbo- 
hydrates, particularly levulose. 

Organic Division — The senior staff of the organic division has 
increased from four to seven members. The four full professors, in- 
cluding Professor Adams, have been here the fifteen years, thus making 
possible the development of a strong teaching unit and some valuable 
long period research activity. The division has made a practice of in- 
viting professors from other institutions to teach in the summer session, 
and some sixteen different men have contributed regular and special 
course work in the summer term. It has been an unusual opportunity 
for staff and students to have the benefit of the additional association 
with these well known organic chemists. 

Research activities and developments in this division are: 

Professor Marvel has been interested in free radicals, polymers, 
dienynes and hydrogen bonding. 

Professor Fuson has turned his attention to the Grignard reagent, 
cleavage of adipic esters and the cyano ester ring closure, dihydro-1,4 
pyrans, the haloform reaction, Friedel-Crafts reaction, glyoxals, poly- 
ketones, benzoins, enediols, and the principle of vinylogy. 

Professor Shriner has investigated the synthesis of compounds 
possessing pharmacological activity, local anesthetics, analgesics and 
antimalarials, structure of benzopyrylium salts, anthocyanins, sulfones 
and sultans. He is building up for graduate students a new course 
dealing with the apparatus and equipment for the semi-micro deter- 
mination of the elements and functional groups of organic compounds. 



Department of Chemistry 35 

This includes not only chemical methods but especially physical 
methods that may be applied to quantitative organic chemistry. 

Doctor Price is actively engaged in problems related to the mecha- 
nism of substitution and orientation in aromatic compounds, the stereo- 
chemical course of substitution and elimination reactions, the mecha- 
nism of vinyl-type polymerization and the reaction of a-furoic acid with 
aromatic compounds. 

Doctor Snyder is studying organic compounds of boron, nitrogen, 
and sulfur. He was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship to study with 
W. H. Mills in Cambridge, England, for the year 1939-1940. Since he 
was not able to use the fellowship because of the war, it is being held 
for him, pending the time when he will be able to do so. 

The research program of the division has been materially aided by 
considerable assistance through fellowships from outside sources. For 
the past three years, three permanent full time post-doctorate research 
assistants on university appointment have been allotted to Professor 
Adams to help him conduct his studies. 

There are two important and unusual teaching methods used by 
this division. One is the organic chemical manufactures work which 
was started during the last war to produce much needed research 
chemicals for this department and for other research laboratories. 
This is a business operation, and at the same time it gives extremely 
beneficial training in larger scale production of chemicals. The Ph.D. 
candidates in organic chemistry elect this work as a course in the 
summer session. During the summer of 1940, thirty-eight men were 
employed. The other method is the practice of making the abstracts 
of reports given in the organic seminar available to a limited number 
of outsiders for a small fee. 

Physical Division — The senior faculty of the division of physical 
chemistry has doubled in size since 1926. There has been a steady 
development of the research fields in which the staff is interested. 

Activities of the department are: 

Professor Rodebush has made contributions dealing with the fol- 
lowing problems: molecular beams, high vacuum technique, an ex- 
tensive series of gas reactions at high pressures, and the recent re- 
search upon molecular structure in solutions, with particular application 
to organic and biological problems. These latter studies have developed 
techniques in the determination of dielectric constants and ultra violet 
and infra red absorption spectra. In the future, the first two of these 
techniques are to be much further extended in this laboratory. 

In 1934, Professor Rodebush addressed the Oxford Meeting of the 
Faraday Society on "Dipole Moment and Ionic Binding." 

Professor Phipps has done special experimental work on molecular 
beams, high vacuum technique and surface ionization. During the year 



36 University of Illinois 



1930-1931 he held a Guggenheim Fellowship and studied with Otto 
Stern at Hamburg. 

Doctor Wall is interested in the statistical theory of polymerization. 

The division has acquired one of the most complete sets of spectro- 
graphic equipment to be found in any university laboratory. This is 
used in cooperation with Professor Buswell. 

Chemical Engineering Division — The Chemical Engineering 
staff, with the exception of Professor Keyes, have all been added 
during this recent period. Significant changes in the curriculum have 
been made, in keeping with modern chemical engineering standards. 
The course has the approval of the American Institute of Chemical 
Engineers, the Engineering Council for Professional Development, 
and the New York State Licensing board for Professional Engineers. 
Two new professional degrees have been instituted, one a professional 
degree in Chemical Engineering in 1932, and the other a Ph.D. in 
Engineering with a major in Chemical Engineering in 1935. 

The national problem contest of the American Institute of Chemical 
Engineers has become one of the senior projects. Illinois undergradu- 
ates won first place in this country-wide contest in 1933 and 1934, 
second place in 1937 and 1939, fourth and fifth place in 1937, and 
honorable mention in 1941. No other institution has an equally good 
record. 

The research problems are both theoretical and practical. A large 
proportion of the projects have been carried on through the Engineer- 
ing Experiment Station of which the chemical engineering division is 
a department. Professor Swann and Professor Straub, with several 
research assistants, conduct all their work through the Station. During 
the past fifteen years, it has been possible to obtain approximately 
$300,000 in funds from outside sources to conduct research of par- 
ticular interest to the industries and especially the utilities, and perhaps 
$100,000 of this sum has been used to install equipment. Much of this 
apparatus has been placed in the so-called experimental shacks erected 
to expand the present chemical engineering facilities and in the absorp- 
tion unit in the power plant. According to a statement made by an 
official of the Chicago Utilities, the embrittlement studies alone have 
saved them over $2,000,000 a year. 

Problems finished or underway in this division during the past 
fifteen years are: embrittlement of boiler plate and water treatment 
for high pressure boilers, under Professor Straub; sulfur dioxide re- 
moval from flue gases and absorption studies, under Professor John- 
stone; electro-organic chemistry involving reductions, under Professor 
Swann; correlation of physical properties at high pressure, under Pro- 
fessor Comings ; ice manufacture, under Doctor Burks ; process testing 
started by Professor Krase and continued by Professor Deem; cataly- 



Department of Chemistry 37 

sis, distillation, high pressure reactions, and equilibrium studies by 
Professor Keyes, in collaboration with the other professors in the 
division. 

Biochemistry Division — Professor Rose has carried on an ex- 
tended research program in the biochemical division. The main prob- 
lems have been metabolism of creatine, purines and dicarboxylic acids ; 
discovery, identification and proof of the spatial configuration of threo- 
nine ; dietary indispensibility of eight amino acids ; demonstration of the 
in vivo synthesis of two amino acids from others ; establishment 
of the quantitative requirements of the growing organism for the ten 
essential amino acids; elucidation of certain types of chemical reactions 
which may be accomplished by the animal organism, such as experi- 
ments on the replacements of essential amino acids by synthetic com- 
pounds. Professor Rose was elected vice president of the American 
Society of Biological Chemists for 1937-1939 and president for 1939- 
1941. He is a member of the Council on Pharmacy and Chemistry of 
the American Medical Association. 

Professor Carter has specialized in the synthesis and reactions of 
hydroxyamino acids such as threonine and serine. Before he left Illi- 
nois, Professor du Vigneaud had done original work on insulin, con- 
version of methionine into homocystine and other amino acid work. 

Sanitary Chemistry — The division of sanitary chemistry con- 
tinues to promote research in anaerobic fermentation, its theory and 
application, and the installation of the process. A $250,000 plant for 
the utilization of this process was erected at Pekin. Water, sewage, 
and trade waste experimentation have stimulated investigation of 
colloids. In conjunction with the State Water Survey, of which Pro- 
fessor Buswell is the head, practical problems of importance to the 
state are being solved, such as relationship of soap utilization to hard- 
ness of water. Investigations relating to bound water, colloids, water 
analysis, and other applied fields are being undertaken, many in 
collaboration with the division of physical chemistry. 

TEACHING AND EDITORIAL CONTRIBUTIONS 

In addition to research interests, teaching and training of younger 
chemists is considered of paramount importance at Illinois. Convincing 
evidence of effort to promote chemical advancement and to improve 
methods of instruction is the following list of books published by 
members of the staff during these fifteen years: 

Adams, Roger and Johnson, J. R. Elementary Laboratory Experiments in Or- 
ganic Chemistry, John Wiley and Sons, New York, 1928, 1933, 1940. 

Buswell, A. M. The Chemistry of Water and Sewage Treatment, A.C.S. Mono- 
graph Series, No. 38, The Chemical Catalog Co., New York, 1928. 

Clark, G. L. Applied X-Rays, McGraw-Hill Book Co., New York, 1927, 1933, 
1940. 



38 University of Illinois 



Fuson, R. C. and Shriner, R. L. Systematic Identification of Organic Com- 
pounds, John Wiley and Sons, Inc., New York, 1935, 1940. 

Hopkins, B S. General Chemistry for Colleges, D. C. Heath, New York, 1930, 
1937. 

Hopkins, B S. Essentials of College Chemistry, D. C. Heath, New York, 1932. 

Hopkins, B S. and Copley, M. J. Laboratory Exercises and Problems in General 
Chemistry, D. C. Heath, New York, Rev. Ed. 1931 (with H. A. Neville) Ed. 
3, 1937. 

Hopkins, B S., Davis, R. E., Smith, H. R., McGill, M. V., and Bradbury, G. 
M. Chemistry and You, Lyons and Carnaham, New York, 1939. 

Mason, W. P. Examination of Water, revised by A. M. Buswell, John Wiley 
and Sons, New York, Ed. 6, 1931. 

Noyes, W. A. and Noyes, W. A., Jr. Modern Alchemy, C. C. Thomas, Spring- 
field, Illinois, 1933. 

Parr, S. W. The Analysis of Fuel, Gas, Water and Lubricants, McGraw-Hill 
Book Co., New York, Ed. 4, 1932. 

Reedy, J. H. Elementary Qualitative Analysis, McGraw-Hill Book Co., New 
York, 1932, 1941. 

Reedy, J. H. Theoretical Qualitative Analysis, McGraw-Hill Book Co., New 
York, 1938. 

Rodebush, W. H. and Rodebush, E. K. An Introductory Course in Physical 
Chemistry, D. Van Nostrand Co., Inc., New York, 1932, 1938. 

Active chemists throughout the country participate in the work of 
the various organizations which are founded to further science. It is 
not possible to relate all that the individual staff members have done. 
Many of them have filled offices of the American Chemical Society, 
three as president while at Illinois, several as director-at-large and 
councillor-at-large, and many as section officers and symposia chairmen. 
Others have held offices in societies such as the American Institute of 
Chemical Engineers, the American Society of Biological Chemists and 
the Electrochemical Society, to mention but a few. It is sufficient to 
emphasize more fully the faithful and efficient service that many of the 
staff have given to the scientific journals which are, in the last analysis, 
the backbone of the records of the progress of chemistry for the 
period. The staff members who have served as editors of chemical 
journals and serials follow: 

W. A. Noyes, Editor, Journal of the American Chemical Society, 1902-1917; 
Associate Editor of the same journal, 1917- ; Editor, Chemical Abstracts, 
1907-1909; Editor, Chemical Reviews, 1924-1926; Editorial Board, 1928- ; 
Editorial Board, Scientific Monographs of the A.C.S. 

Roger Adams, Organic Syntheses, Editor, Vol. 1 and 8, Board, 1921-1933; Asso- 
ciate Editor, Journal of the American Chemical Society, 1922-1932. 

W. C. Rose, Associate Editor, Journal of Biological Chemistry, 1936- ; Asso- 
ciate Editor, Journal of Nutrition, 1935-1939. 

B S. Hopkins, Contributing Editor, Journal of Chemical Education, 1924- ; Di- 
rectory and Advisory Board, School Science and Mathematics, 1917- . 

W. H. Rodebush, Associate Editor, Journal of Physical Chemistry, 1941- . 

G. L. Clark, Assistant Editor, Chemical Abstracts, 1922-1928; Associate Editor, 
Journal of Radiology, 1929- ; Associate Editor, Biodynamica, 1939- . 



Department of Chemistry 



39 



C. S. Marvel, Organic Syntheses, Editor, Vol. 5 and 11, Board, 1923-1931; As- 

sociate Editor, Journal of Organic Chemistry, 1936- ; Associate Editor, 

Chemical Reviews, 1937-1940. 
R. C. Fuson, Associate Editor, Journal of the American Chemical Society, 

1932- ; Organic Syntheses, Editor, Vol. 18, Board, 1933-1938. 
R. L. Shriner, Associate Editor, Journal of Organic Chemistry, 1936- ; Organic 

Syntheses, Board, 1939- . 
J. H. Reedy, Assistant Editor, Chemical Abstracts, 1928. 
L. F. Audrieth, Inorganic Syntheses, Associate Editor, 1939- ; Editor, Phi 

Lambda Upsilon Register, 1940- . 
J. C. Bailar, Jr., Inorganic Syntheses, Associate Editor, 1939- . 
R. M. Parr, Contributing Editor, The Science Teacher, 1933- . 

D. G. Nicholson, Director and Advisory Board, The Science Teacher, 1938- . 



ENROLLMENT AND RESTRICTIONS 

The growth of the staff has been promoted by the increased enroll- 
ment. The comparative figures of the number of students in 1926-1927, 
1936-1937, 1940-1941 are shown in the following table: 





1926-1927 


1936-1937 


1940-1941 




Chem. 
Cur. 


L.A.S. 
Chem. 


Chem. 
Eng. 


Grad. 


Chem. 
Cur. 


L.A.S. 
Chem. 


Chem. 
Eng. 


Grad. 


Chem. 
Cur. 


L.A.S. 
Chem. 


Chem. 
Eng. 


Grad. 


Freshmen .... 


12 




42 




51 




136 




100 




133 




Sophomores . . 


18 




35 




72 




78 




40 




49 




Juniors 


16 


44 


27 




56 


61 


68 




56 


116 


72 




Seniors 


11 


35 


11 




42 


53 


48 




35 


43 


59 




Total 


57 


79 


115 


114 


221 


114 


330 


205 


231 


159 


313 


185 



This does not represent a year by year change but only the ten year 
and fifteen year figures. It is evident that growth in enrollment has 
been stimulated by the increased demand for chemists and chemical 
engineers, not merely with a bachelor's degree, but more especially 
with advanced degrees. Illinois has attracted both undergraduates and 
graduates from widely scattered parts of the country, and their success 
after leaving the university has been an incentive to others to study at 
the same institution. 

In addition to the students in the curricula, the enrollment in the 
service courses increased with the marked growth of the university as 
a whole. This gain taxed the facilities of the department to the utmost. 
The maximum number of undergraduate students was reached in 1936- 



40 University of Illinois 



1937 and required a budget much larger than that allocated to the 
Chemistry Department. The staff was inadequate to handle so many 
individuals properly, and the space available in the laboratories necessi- 
tated a crowding incommensurate with satisfactory teaching. One 
method of preventing overcrowding had been adopted before this year. 
In 1932, it became necessary to remove the senior research course from 
the required list, and to permit its election only by those whose stand- 
ards of work are such as to warrant special permission from one of the 
senior staff. This regulation serves as an incentive for the student to 
maintain his academic record at a high level. 

The situation by 1936 became so acute that the department obtained 
permission from the Board of Trustees to limit the enrollment of the 
undergraduates in chemistry and chemical engineering by a definite 
grade average requirement. This has been in effect since the fall of 
1937. To quote the ruling — 

With the exception of students in the College of Engineering 
and the College of Agriculture, registration of students in chemistry 
courses (other than Chemistry 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7a, 8a, 8b) is restricted 
to those having a grade-point average of at least 3.5 in all subjects, 
exclusive of the basic courses in military training and the required 
work in physical education and hygiene, and an average of at least 
3.5 in the chemistry courses. Transfer students to be admitted must 
have a corresponding record in the institution from which they 
transfer and must maintain a similar average at the University of 
Illinois. 

In the fall of 1938 when the registration of the graduate students 
reached unwieldy proportions — a total of two hundred and seventy- 
four — definite grade requirements for entrance into the Graduate 
School in chemistry were established. The present ruling for graduates 
is as follows: 

In order to be eligible for entrance to the Graduate School in 
chemistry an individual must have seventy-five per cent A's and B's 
in all of his undergraduate subjects exclusive of hygiene, military, 
and physical education courses. 

Students entering the Graduate School in chemistry with a 
master's degree (or equivalent) from another institution will be 
accepted on the basis of their graduate work only, which must show 
a minimum average of 4.5 in all subjects. 

The plan of registration has not been in operation long enough to 
assemble significant statistics. The total enrollment of undergraduates 
in the Curricula of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering is now essen- 
tially the same as in 1936-1937. The regular increases each year have 
been stopped. Fewer Freshmen who start at Illinois continue through 
the senior year, but loss by withdrawal of underclassmen from the 
course is offset by an increased number of transfer students who come 



Department of Chemistry 41 

to Illinois from Junior Colleges for their last two years of undergradu- 
ate study. It is already evident, however, that the seniors as a whole 
are more capable students than previously, and fewer students after 
the Freshman year are forced to withdraw due to poor scholarship. 
The graduate enrollment has naturally decreased, but the proportional 
number who are able to qualify for advanced degrees has become 
larger. These rulings are not completely satisfactory but are the best 
that could be devised under the circumstances. 

CHANGES IN CURRICULA 

A comparison of the prescribed curricula in chemistry in 1926- 
1927 and 1940-1941 shows certain changes. Mineralogy, gas and fuel 
analysis, the inspection trips, the Saturday morning Journal Meeting, 
Chemical Technology, the thesis, and a choice of the following three 
courses — English writers of the 19th century, history of the United 
States for the past one hundred years, or analytical mechanics, have 
been dropped. Two courses in physical chemistry and special methods 
in quantitative analysis have been added. This has given a greater op- 
portunity for electives. 

The curriculum in Chemical Engineering has had many changes. 
The curriculum itself has been changed and also the character of the 
required courses. Specialized subjects, such as Gas and Fuel Analysis, 
Assaying, and Metallurgy, have been dropped from the required list. 
The requirements in chemistry and applied physics have been increased 
by adding Chemical Thermodynamics, more Theoretical and Applied 
Mechanics, more Electrical Engineering (electrical physics) and 
courses in the Principles of Chemical Engineering. Courses in Me- 
chanical Engineering have been changed to courses in Engineering 
Thermodynamics. The courses in Mathematics have been rearranged 
so that calculus is started in the Freshman year, and some work in 
Differential Equations is given now in the Sophomore year. Advanced 
courses in Chemistry or Engineering may now be elected in place of the 
Thesis formerly required. General Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry 
requirements have been shortened to three semesters, and the quanti- 
tative principles of chemistry are accented right from the start. The 
application of the Principles of Chemistry and Physics are stressed 
in the Senior year in the form of courses on the Unit Operations and 
Unit Processes of Chemical Engineering. 

The general content of all the courses in the department has shifted 
with the progress of the science. Moreover, there have been some 
definite additions to the electives. Ten years ago, a new course was 
offered by the inorganic division to meet the needs of the students who 
are not primarily interested in chemistry and yet want a survey of the 
field as a timely and pertinent modern topic. This new course is the 



42 University of Illinois 



counterpart of many such courses that are being offered throughout the 
country to emphasize the formal principles of chemistry and yet present 
the material from the cultural rather than a professional point of view. 
In the analytical division Professor Reedy has inaugurated a course 
on methods and technique in micro-analysis. Professor Carter has 
developed a new course on vitamines and hormones, and Doctor Wall 
has introduced a course in Kinetic Theory, Statistical Mechanics and 
Molecular Dynamics. He also presents a course in physical chemistry, 
not requiring calculus, for premedical students and biological students. 

OPERATIVE STAFF 

A department cannot be run efficiently by means of mechanical 
equipment and teaching and research staff alone. The operative staff 
which, like the teaching staff, has increased with the growth of the 
student body, has played an important role in the progress and success 
of the chemistry department. Here, too, Illinois has been fortunate in 
having a nucleus of individuals who have been part of the organization 
of the chemistry group during all or practically all of the fifteen years. 
Mrs. Edna V. Evans as Executive Clerk and Secretary to the Head 
of the Department has kept the office running in a very efficient 
manner. She has the assistance of five stenographers. Mr. C. F. Miller 
has been head clerk of the chemistry department for many years. In 
the storerooms there is a very experienced group under the direction 
of Mr. J. M. Lindgren as supervisor. There are eight storekeepers 
and five laboratory helpers. Of the storekeepers, Thomas Peel was the 
inorganic lecture demonstrator until he retired in 1940. E. N. Genung 
has taken his place. Forrest Mock, storekeeper, C. E. Dalton, L. E. 
Tillotson, L. S. Kirby, M. T. Murrell, and C. M. Scott, laboratory 
storekeepers, and C. B. Dunn and Florence Alexander, laboratory 
helpers, have all been here through this period. Four others, G. A. 
Pittman, S. A. Phillips, L. E. Bailey, and Verle Walters complete this 
group. Arthur E. Wood has been the mechanician of the department, 
and associated with him is his assistant, C. W. Powers. Mr. Lindgren 
is also technical analyst in charge of a laboratory in which he super- 
vises the testing of all the supplies purchased by the university to ascer- 
tain whether they meet standard specifications. This includes such 
commodities as coal, oil, chemicals and glassware. In addition, this 
laboratory does work for other campus departments and some state 
government organizations. 

Mr. Paul Anders has served the department as glassblower since 
1914. Besides making it possible for the staff and students to carry on 
all types of chemical research requiring intricate glass apparatus, Mr. 
Anders has offered a course in glassblowing each year to a group of 
seniors and graduate students. 



Department of Chemistry 43 

In view of the fact that organic and biological research involves 
the use of small amounts of material and micro-analytical methods, 
a micro-analyst was secured in 1929 to carry out the essential deter- 
minations. The laboratory for this type of analysis is in operation at 
present with two full time assistants. 

CHEMICAL LIBRARY 

The departmental library has had a constant growth which has 
reached a point where volumes no longer used regularly by staff or 
students must be removed to the main library to make room for new 
books and journals. The policy of the department has always been 
to include publications in all the fields of chemistry and acquire sets of 
all the important chemical journals. In this period the department has 
increased its subscriptions from two hundred and fifty periodicals to 
three hundred. The total number of volumes of periodicals has in- 
creased from 7,500 to 11,921, so it has become necessary to cut the 
number of books housed in the Chemistry Building from 5,600 to 4,505. 
Five hundred and six theses have been added. The library contains the 
portraits of three men who did much to place the department in its 
present strong position. In 1933, the alumni presented the portraits of 
Professor Palmer, Professor Parr and Professor Noyes to the Univer- 
sity, as a fitting recognition to them as outstanding members of the de- 
partment and the university. This was done with appropriate ceremony 
in the presence of a large number of the friends of these men. 

RETIREMENTS 

With regret, the announcement must be made that two of the staff, 
Professor B Smith Hopkins and Doctor Rosalie M. Parr, have reached 
the retirement age established by University regulation and will retire 
at the end of the academic year. After a period of service which began 
in 1912, Professor Hopkins will give up active duty as head of the 
inorganic division. He succeeded Doctor C. W. Balke and brought to a 
culmination the work on the isolation of Element Number 61, which 
he named after the state, "Illinium." Under his direction one of the 
most active research laboratories in the country has been devoted to 
inorganic chemistry. The students trained in it have gone to many in- 
stitutions in the United States to make inorganic chemistry a live and 
vital subject. In addition to this research program and graduate course 
work, Professor Hopkins has had charge of the teaching of General In- 
organic Chemistry, which has entailed direct supervision of a large 
group of graduate assistants and their training as teachers. In a uni- 
versity of this size, that is really a colossal undertaking. The smooth 
operation of the division is due to his organization of the group, and 



44 University of Illinois 



its success is due to the constant evolution within the courses them- 
selves. Most favored have been the younger men on the senior staff 
of the division, who, through the encouragement and help of Professor 
Hopkins, have been given such a splendid opportunity to develop their 
teaching by the lecture system, to organize courses, and to start their 
independent research. Many of the men who have been here for a 
short time have left, to assume positions of marked responsibility. 
They will regret to hear that others will not have the inestimable 
privilege of starting their careers under the friendly guidance which 
Professor Hopkins has always given. He was elected to membership 
in the American Philosophical Society in 1927 and was president of the 
Illinois Academy of Science in 1933. He has taken part in the direction 
of the local section of the American Chemical Society, and the Division 
of Chemical Education, and was elected councillor-at-large for the 
national organization for 1935-1937. Fortunately, Professor Hopkins 
will remain closely associated with the department for at least another 
year in the capacity of lecturer in the physical science course to be 
given as a Sophomore subject in the General Division in the College of 
Liberal Arts and Sciences. He has been actively engaged in the organi- 
zation of this course during the past year. His Rare Earth laboratory 
will be continued and the methods of training students and student as- 
sistants will be the basis for future instruction. It is natural to find 
that Professor Hopkins extends his interest in the education of young 
people to the city of Urbana where he has served as president of the 
School Board for a number of years. He has contributed to the com- 
munity as a charter member of one of the service clubs and as an 
active member of his church organization. 

Since 1918, Doctor Rosalie M. Parr has been a member of the in- 
organic division where she has identified herself with the development 
of the courses in this field. She has pursued actively her research 
studies upon problems relating to the use of rare metals in the treat- 
ment of anemia and cancer. Serving as its treasurer, she has been 
active in the Division of Chemical Education of the American Chemi- 
cal Society, and in the Illinois Junior Academy of Science. She has 
helped direct the policies of the women's scientific organizations and 
has associated herself with a number of the other activities of the 
young women of the university. 

In concluding the account of the University of Illinois Chemistry 
Department prepared in 1927, Professor Beal wrote the following: 
"Entering now upon a new period of life with young men in charge it 
will be closely watched. There is no doubt in the minds of its friends 
as to its outcome. It should hold its place as long as the University 
exists." The activities of these fifteen years have emphatically justified 
this statement. We are now entering the fifth decade of the century 



Department of Chemistry 45 

amid world events of staggering proportions. As in 1917, there is talk 
of war and national defense. The department is cooperating in the 
solution of problems related to the present emergency. The develop- 
ment of the department during the next ten years is unpredictable if the 
impacts of social and economic history upon contemporary living shift 
established ideals. Fortunately the department has a group of younger 
men on the staff who are rapidly developing their talents. They are 
demonstrating their ability to accept responsibility and can be relied 
upon to maintain the present standards when in the future the reputa- 
tion of the department rests in their hands. 



HONORARY AND PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZATIONS 

By D. T. Englis 

THE AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY 

The University of Illinois Section of the American Chemical 
Society was organized in 1906. Although the membership is made 
up mainly of persons associated with the chemistry department or other 
laboratories at Urbana, all members living within a convenient driving 
radius are affiliated and participate as far as possible in the affairs of 
the section. Regular meetings are held each month during the school 
year, with some visiting or local chemist as speaker. Additional special 
meetings may be called to take advantage of visits of other distin- 
guished workers in the field. The section makes a consistent effort to 
interest students in the society. Of the total of two hundred and fifty 
members, approximately forty per cent are of junior grade. 

PHI LAMBDA UPSILON 

Phi Lambda Upsilon, national honorary chemical society, was 
founded in March, 1899, at the University of Illinois. The Society 
stands as a monument to the enthusiasm and zeal of H. C. Porter, 
P. F. A. Rudnick, and F. C. Koch, at that time seniors majoring in 
chemistry. The founders were assisted in their undertaking by Profes- 
sors A. W. Palmer, H. S. Grindley, and S. W. Parr, who continued for 
many years to manifest an active interest in the Society and to work for 
the maintenance of its high standards. The aims and purposes of the 
Society were from its beginning ''the promotion of high scholar- 
ship and original investigation in all branches of pure and applied 
Chemistry." 

At present there are thirty-eight chapters distributed throughout 
the country, and over ten thousand chemists have been initiated into 
the Society. Many of the chapters give scholarship awards. Alpha 
chapter annually honors the sophomore in chemistry or chemical engi- 
neering maintaining the highest scholastic average during his first three 
semesters' work in the University of Illinois. The winner's name is 
engraved on a permanent cup displayed in the Chemistry Annex, and 
he is presented with a smaller engraved cup for his permanent posses- 
sion. In addition, Alpha chapter annually brings several prominent 
chemists to the campus for public lectures. 

ALPHA CHI SIGMA 

The Zeta chapter of Alpha Chi Sigma, national fraternity, was 
established at Illinois in 1908 and has as its objective the fostering of 

46 



Department of Chemistry 47 

good fellowship among chemists, as well as the promotion of scholar- 
ship and interest in the science. Of the present ninety-five active 
members of the chapter, eighteen are undergraduate, and seventy- 
seven are graduates. Forty-three of the members live in the house, 
which is owned and operated by the group. Smokers and other social 
functions are arranged. Every effort is made to promote more intimate 
and pleasant relations between the faculty and students. The chapter 
sponsors an annual open lecture by a distinguished chemist and cooper- 
ates in the activities of the American Chemical Society. As a stimulus 
to scholarship the organization has presented a plaque, which hangs in 
the chemistry library, and each year, upon this plaque, is inscribed the 
name of the freshman who has made the most outstanding record for 
the first semester in chemistry or chemical engineering. The desire of 
the chapter members to broaden their knowledge and to learn in a 
general way of the various problems in progress in the department has 
been responsible for a series of special meetings held in the house each 
spring. At these the members who are completing their Ph.D. theses 
give brief presentations of findings of their researches. 

IOTA SIGMA PI 

In 1915 Alpha Theta Chi, an honorary chemical organization for 
graduate and undergraduate women, was formed at the University of 
Illinois. In 1918 this group united with the national fraternity Iota 
Sigma Pi as Iodine, the eighth chapter. At the weekly meetings mem- 
bers of the group speak on their researches or other subjects in which 
they are interested, and once a year Iota Sigma Pi sponsors a lecture 
by an outstanding woman chemist. Since 1927 the chapter has awarded 
an annual prize of twenty dollars to the senior, eligible to membership 
in the society, but not necessarily a member, who has the highest aver- 
age in chemistry during her attendance at the University. 

AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERS 

The student chapter of the American Institute of Chemical Engi- 
neers is a professional organization sponsored by the parent organiza- 
tion. The Illinois chapter, installed in 1927, was the eighth student 
chapter to be established. Today there are seventy-two student chap- 
ters. The local group has one hundred and twenty members. The 
activities consist of social meetings and talks given by men who are 
authorities in their fields. Their purpose is to acquaint the student 
chemical engineer with the professional activities, responsibilities, and 
duties which he will encounter after graduation, and to enable him to 
become better acquainted with his fellow students. 



48 University of Illinois 



OMEGA CHI EPSILON 

Omega Chi Epsilon had its inception at the University of Illinois in 
the spring of 1931, the idea for the organization originating with Mr. 
F. C. Howard, of the Chemical Engineering staff. Following his sug- 
gestion, several seniors, with the counsel of the staff members, drew 
up a set of by-laws, designed a key, and petitioned the Council of Ad- 
ministration for a charter. Since its founding, Omega Chi Epsilon 
has become a national organization with chapters at Iowa State College, 
the University of Minnesota, and Clarkson College of Technology. The 
organization is purely an honorary one. Its purpose is to encourage 
superior scholarship among student chemical engineers ; its require- 
ments for membership are very high. 

ASSOCIATION OF ILLINOIS CHEMISTS 

All persons who have been students, teachers, or otherwise associ- 
ated with the department of chemistry are automatically members of 
the Association of Illinois Chemists. This organization originated at a 
luncheon get-together at the St. Louis meeting of the American Chemi- 
cal Society in April, 1928. The association has been responsible for 
the gift to the department of chemistry of the bronze tablet honoring 
Miss Sparks, and for the portraits of Professors Palmer, Noyes, and 
Parr. During certain years it has operated under a regularly elected 
group of officers, but at present continues to function less formally, but 
with the same spirit, for promotion of the interests of the department. 
A group luncheon is scheduled at each national meeting of the Ameri- 
can Chemical Society. Here old friendships are renewed and new ones 
are made. As a regular feature of the luncheon, the head of the depart- 
ment presents a brief resume of the activities and progress in chemistry 
at the University. 



CHEMISTRY AND CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 
CURRICULA 

The following curricula in chemistry and chemical engineering afford 
more specialized training than is required of students who make chem- 
istry their major subject in the general curriculum of liberal arts and 
sciences. 

The minimum language requirement for graduation in these cur- 
ricula is the equivalent of two years of college work in German or 
French. When a student does not offer either German or French for 
entrance, the second year of the language required for graduation may 
be counted as an elective in either curriculum. Students entering with 
two units of credit for German or French (two units in high school 
being equivalent to one year in college) should complete this minimum 
requirement in their freshman year. Those entering with less than two 
units in German or French should complete this requirement in their 
sophomore year or as early as possible. 

At the end of each semester, when the scholastic averages of all 
students are computed, any student whose grade-point average is less 
than 3.5 in chemistry courses — or in all subjects exclusive of the re- 
quired military, physical education, and hygiene — is denied further 
registration in chemistry courses other than Chemistry 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 
7a, 8a, 8b, until such a time as the student may have improved his 
average to this minimum. Students transferring from other colleges 
or universities must have a corresponding average in order to be ad- 
mitted to these curricula and must maintain such an average in order 
to continue. 

CURRICULUM IN CHEMISTRY 

For the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Chemistry 
First Year 

FIRST SEMESTER HOURS SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Chem. 2 — Inorganic Chemistry 1 . . . 3 Chem. 6 — Inorganic Chemistry.. . 5 

Math. 2 — College Algebra 3 Math. 6a — Analytical Geometry.. 4 

Math. 4 — Plane Trigonometry 2 .. . . 2 German or French 4 

German or French 4 Rhet. 2 — Rhetoric and Compo- 

Rhet. 1 — Rhetoric and Compo- sition 3 

sition 3 Physical Education 

Hygiene 5 (or 2, for Women) 2 Military Science (for Men) 

Physical Education 

Military Science (for Men) 

Total 17 Total 16 



1 Students without entrance credit in chemistry substitute Chemistry 1 (five hours) for 
Chemistry 2 (three hours). 

2 Students with entrance credit in trigonometry are not required to take Mathematics 4. 

49 



50 



University of Illinois 



Second 

FIRST SEMESTER HOURS 

Chem. 10 — Qualitative Analysis. . . 5 

Math. 8a — Differential Calculus. . . 3 

Physics la — General Physics 4 

Physics 3a — Physics Laboratory. . . 1 

Physical Education 

Military Science (for Men) 

Electives 1 3 

Total 16 



Year 

SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Chem. 24 — Quantitative Analysis 5 

Math. 8b— Integral Calculus 3 

Physics lb — General Physics 4 

Physics 3b — Physics Laboratory. . 1 

Physical Education 

Military Science (for Men) 

Electives 1 2 

Total 15 



Third Year 



Chem. 34 — Organic Chemistry. . . 
Chem. 40 — Physical Chemistry. . 
Chem. 41 — Physical Chemistry 

Lab 

Chem. 92 — Chemical Literature. . 
Econ. 2 — Elements of Economics. 



Electives 1 4 



Chem. 36 — Organic Chemistry. . . 
Chem. 37 — Organic Chemistry 

Lab 

Chem. 42 — Physical Chemistry.. . 
Chem. 43 — Physical Chemistry 

Lab 

Chem. 93b — Chemical Literature 
Electives 1 



Total 



17 



Total. 



17 



Fourth Year 



Chem. 27 — Quantitative Analysis.. 3 
Chem. 95a — History of Chemistry 2 
Electives 1 11 



Total . 



16 



Electives 1 16 

Total 16 



CURRICULUM IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

For the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering 
First Year 



FIRST SEMESTER HOURS 

Chem. 8a — Inorganic Chemistry 

and Qualitative Analysis 5 

Math. 2— College Algebra 3 

Math. 4- — Plane Trigonometry 2 . .. . 2 

German or French 4 

Rhet. 1 — Rhetoric and Compo- 
sition 3 

Physical Education 

Military Science (for Men) 

Total 17 



SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Chem. 8b — Inorganic Chemistry 

and Qualitative Analysis 5 

Math. 6a — Analytical Geometry. . 4 

German or French 4 

Rhet. 2 — Rhetoric and Compo- 
sition 3 

Hygiene 5 2 

Physical Education 

Military Science (for Men) 

Total 18 - 



Suggested courses for electives are: Zoology 1, 2, 5, 7; Botany la, lb; English 20a, 
20b; Geology 20, 43; History 3a, 3b; Bacteriology 5a, 5b; German or French. Of the total 
electives for graduation, at least 21 hours should be from advanced courses in chemistry and 
at least 10 hours from courses offered by other departments. With the permission of the 
adviser, students may substitute courses in physics, mathematics, or other closely allied 
sciences for a portion of the 21 hours in advanced chemistry courses. 

2 Students with entrance credit in trigonometry are not required to take Mathematics 4. 



Department of Chemistry 



51 



CURRICULUM IN CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 
(Concluded) 



Second 

FIRST SEMESTER HOURS 

Chem. 24 — Quantitative Analysis. . 5 

Math. 8a — Differential Calculus. . . 3 

Physics la — General Physics 4 

Physics 3a — Physics Laboratory. . . 1 

G.E.D. 6 — Elements of Drawing. . 3 

Physical Education 

Military Science (for Men) 

Total 16 



Year 

SECOND SEMESTER HOURS 

Chem. 34 — Organic Chemistry. . . 5 

Math. 8b— Integral Calculus 3 

Physics lb — General Physics 4 

Physics 3b — Physics Laboratory. . 1 

T.A.M. 1— Analytical Mechanics 2 

Physical Education 

Military Science (for Men) 

Total 15 



Third Year 



Chem. 36 — Organic Chemistry. ... 3 

Chem. 37 — Organic Chemistry Lab. 2 

Chem. 40 — Physical Chemistry. . . 3 
Chem. 41 — Physical Chemistry 

Lab 1 

T.A.M. 3— Resistance of Materials 3 
T.A.M. 63— Resistance of Mat. 

Lab 1 

E.E. 11 — Direct Current Apparatus 3 

E.E. 61— D.C. and A.C. Lab _1_ 

Total 17 



Chem. 42 — Physical Chemistry. . . 3 
Chem. 63b — Chemical Engi- 
neering 3 

M.E. 2 — Steam Engineering 3 

E.E. 12 — Alternating Current 

Apparatus 3 

E.E. 62— D.C. and A.C. Lab 1 

Electives 5 



Total . 



Fourth Year 



Chem. 44a — Thermodynamics. ... 2 
Chem. 60a — Chemical Engineering 

Unit Processes 3 

Chem. 61a — Principles of Chemical 

Engineering 3 

Chem. 62a — Principles of Research 

and Development 2 

Chem. 66a — Inspection Trip \ 

Chem. 68a — Unit Operations Lab.. 2 
Chem. 69a — Chemical Engineering 

Projects Laboratory 2 

Electives 1 3 

Total 17 V 



Chem. 61b — Principles of Chemi- 
cal Engineering 3 

Chem. 66b — Inspection Trip ] 

Chem. 68b — Unit Operations Lab- 
oratory 2 

M.E. 61 — Mechanical Engineering 
Laboratory 

Electives 1 10 



Total . 



17V 2 



*Five hours of electives must be in courses for advanced undergraduates in chemistry or 
chemical engineering, approved by the adviser. 



COURSES OFFERED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF 
CHEMISTRY, 1940-1941 

Courses for Undergraduates 

INORGANIC CHEMISTRY AND QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS 

1. Inorganic Chemistry. — Non-metallic elements. For students who have had 

no chemistry. S, I, and II, (5). Seniors receive only three hours credit. 
Prerequisite: One unit of entrance credit in physics, or 2y£ units of 
entrance credit in mathematics, or credit in Mathematics 2 or 3. Students 
who have received entrance credit for high school chemistry are given 
only three hours credit for Chemistry 1. Professor Hopkins, Dr. Roe, Dr. 
Laitinen; (S, Associate Professor Bailar) ; and assistants. 

2. Inorganic Chemistry. — Lectures, recitations, and laboratory. For all students 

who have had one year of high school chemistry. S, I, and II, (3). Seniors 
and students who have credit in Chemistry 7a receive only two hours 
credit. Prerequisite: One unit of entrance credit in chemistry. Students 
whose preparation proves to be inadequate for continuing this course will 
be required to change their registration to Chemistry 1 or 3. Students 
who have not used their high school chemistry for entrance may receive 
five hours credit for Chemistry 2 if they complete the course with a grade 
of "C" or higher. Students who have failed in Chemistry 1 are permitted 
to register for Chemistry 2 and will receive five hours credit if their final 
grade is "C" or higher. Dr. Nicholson, Dr. Schirmer, Dr. Roe, Dr. 
Moeller; (S, Associate Professor Bailar) ; and assistants. 

3. Inorganic Chemistry. — Lectures, recitations, and laboratory. For engineering 

students who have had no chemistry. S, I, and II, (4). Seniors receive 
only three hours credit. Professor Hopkins, Dr. Roe, Dr. Laitinen; (S, 
Associate Professor Bailar) ; and assistants. 

4. Chemistry of the Metallic Elements. — Lectures, recitations, and laboratory. 

Limited to students in the engineering curricula. I and II, (4). Seniors 
receive only three hours credit. Prerequisite: Chemistry 1, 2, or 3. Dr. 
Taebel, Dr. Schirmer, and assistants. 

5. Inorganic Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis. — Lectures, recitations, and 

laboratory. For students who are not eligible for Chemistry 4 or 6. S, I, 
and II, (5). Seniors receive only three hours credit. Prerequisite: 
Chemistry 1, 2, or 3. Associate Professor Bailar, Dr. Moeller; (S, Dr. 
Taebel, Dr. Schirmer) ; and assistants. 

6. Inorganic Chemistry. — Metallic elements. For students in the curricula of 

chemistry, ceramics, and ceramic engineering, and chemistry majors who 
are not pre-medics. I and II, (5). Seniors receive only three hours 
credit. Prerequisite: Chemistry 1, 2, or 3. Professor Hopkins, Associate 
Professor Bailar, and assistants. 
7a. General Chemistry. — Non-professional chemistry. Lectures, recitations, and 
laboratory. Not open to students who have earned credit in high school 
chemistry. This course may be applied toward the science group require- 
ments. After completing this course a student is permitted to register 
in Chemistry 2, or by securing special permission he may register in Chem- 
istry 4, 5, or 6. I, (5). Seniors receive only three hours credit. Assistant 
Professor Bartow. 

52 



Department of Chemistry 53 

8a-8b. Inorganic Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis. — For students in the 
curriculum of chemical engineering. Lectures, recitations, and laboratory. 
I and II, (5). Seniors receive only three hours credit. Prerequisite: One 
unit of entrance credit in chemistry. Associate Professor Audrieth. 

ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY 

10. Qualitative Analysis. — Qualitative analysis of metals and inorganic com- 
pounds. Required of students whose major is chemistry and those reg- 
istered in the curriculum of chemistry. Lectures, recitations, and labora- 
tory. I and II, (5). Prerequisite: Chemistry 6. Associate Professor 
Reedy and assistants. 

22. Elementary Quantitative Analysis. — Gravimetric and volumetric analysis, 
stoichiometrical relations, practical applications. Lectures, recitations, and 
laboratory. S, I, and II, (5). Prerequisite: Chemistry 4 or 5. For stu- 
dents in home economics and pre-medical courses and all others who 
have not followed the sequence Chemistry 1, 2 or 3, 6 and 10. Associate 
Professor Englis ; (S, Dr. Gross); and assistants. 

23b. Quantitative Analysis. — For students in ceramics and ceramic engineer- 
ing only. Gravimetric and volumetric analysis, modern theory and prac- 
tice, practical applications, especially in the field of ceramic materials. Lec- 
tures, recitations, and laboratory. II, (4). Prerequisite: Chemistry 10. Dr. 
Gross and assistants. 

24. Quantitative Analysis. — Gravimetric and volumetric analysis, modern 
advanced theory and practice. Lectures, recitations, and laboratory. S, 
I, and II, (5). Prerequisite: Chemistry 10. Professors Clark and Smith; 
(S, Dr. Gross) ; and assistants. 

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 

32. Elementary Organic Chemistry. — Especially for students in agriculture. 

Important compounds of carbon. Lectures, recitations, and laboratory. 
I and II, (3). Prerequisite: Chemistry 5 or 10. Dr. Snyder, Dr. Emer- 
son, and assistants. 

33. Elementary Organic Chemistry. — For students in home economics and pre- 

medical courses. Lectures, recitations, and laboratory. S, I, and II, (5). 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 5 or 10. Dr. Price; (S, Dr. Wiselogle) ; and 
assistants. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates 

INORGANIC CHEMISTRY 

15b. Inorganic Chemistry. — Periodic relationship, preparation, and application 
of the common elements and compounds. Lectures and recitations. II, (3). 
Prerequisite: Junior standing; fifteen hours credit in chemistry in ad- 
dition to elementary courses. Associate Professor Audrieth. 

16b. Inorganic Chemistry. — Laboratory. Preparation of the less easily produced 
inorganic compounds. II, (2). Prerequisite: Registration or credit in 
Chemistry 15b. Associate Professor Audrieth. 

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 

34. Organic Chemistry. — For students whose major is chemistry or for those 

registered in the curriculum of chemistry or chemical engineering. Lec- 
tures, recitations, and laboratory. I and II, (5). Prerequisite: Chemistry 
6, 10, and 24. Dr. Snyder, Dr. Emerson, and assistants. 



54 University of Illinois 



PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY 

47. Elementary Physical Chemistry. — For pre-medical students only. Lectures 
and laboratory. I and II, (4). Prerequisite: Chemistry 22, 33; Physics 
7b, 8b, or equivalent; junior standing. Dr. Wall. 

48a-48b. Elementary Physical Chemistry. — For engineers. Not open to chem- 
istry majors. I and II, (3). Prerequisite: Chemistry 22; Physics la-lb 
or 7a-7b; Mathematics 7 or 8a-8b. Dr. Eddy. 

chemical engineering 

66a-66b. Inspection Trip. — Required of chemical engineers. Estimated cost $15 
to $20. I and II, O/2). Prerequisite: Senior standing in chemistry or 
chemical engineering. Professor Johnstone. 

MISCELLANEOUS 

90a-90b. Thesis. — Senior research in chemistry and chemical engineering optional 
instead of required. Each student who desires research must receive 
special permission both from the instructor under whom he is to work 
and from the head of the division in which the research is to be taken. 
Such written permission should be presented, at time of registration, to 
the adviser for the chemists or chemical engineers. Except under unusual 
circumstances, only those students registered in Chemistry 90a or 90b 
will be recommended for honors. All students taking this course must 
present a thesis to receive credit. S, I, and II, (3 to 5). Prerequisite: 
Chemistry 24, 34, 40, 41, 42, and 43, or consent of head of department. 
Chemistry 43 is not required for chemical engineers. Professor Adams 
(in charge). 

91b. Elements of Glass-Blowing. — Laboratory. Construction and repair of glass 
apparatus. II, (1). Prerequisite: Two years of work in chemistry. Mr. 
Anders. 

92. Chemical Literature and Reference Work. — Required of juniors in the 
chemistry curriculum; advised for juniors whose major is chemistry and 
for students in the curriculum of chemical engineering. I and II, (1). 
Prerequisite: Eighteen hours of chemistry; one year of French or 
German; junior standing. Assistant Professor Bartow. 

93b. Chemical Literature and Reference Work. — For those who have had one 
semester of Chemistry 92. Required of juniors in chemistry; advised for 
juniors whose major is chemistry and for students in the curriculum of 
chemical engineering. II, (1). Prerequisite: Chemistry 92. Assistant 
Professor Bartow. 

94b. Teachers' Course. — Methods of teaching elementary chemistry. Open only 
to those who expect to teach. II, (3). Prerequisite: Thirteen hours of 
chemistry; senior standing. Dr. Nicholson. 

Courses for Advanced Undergraduates and Graduates 

INORGANIC CHEMISTRY 

S17. Methods of Teaching Elementary Chemistry in the High School. — This 
course includes a study of the problems encountered in teaching chemistry. 
Round table discussions, assigned readings, and reports. S, (3). Pre- 
requisite: At least one full year's teaching in high school, or consent of 
instructor. Dr. Nicholson. 



Department of Chemistry 55 

ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY 

25b. A Survey of Analytical Chemistry. — For advanced undergraduate and 
graduate students requiring further training and review in analytical 
chemistry. Not open to students who have had Chemistry 10, 24, or S120. 
II, (3). Prerequisite: Senior standing, or consent of instructor. Asso- 
ciate Professor Reedy. 

27. Special Methods and Instruments in Quantitative Analysis. — Gas analy- 
sis ; electrometric titration, optical methods, and other advanced analyses. 
I and II, (3). Prerequisite: Chemistry 24 and 34; registration or credit 
in Chemistry 40 and 41. Professor G. F. Smith. 

29b. Food Analysis. — Quantitative organic analysis of food products ; alcohols, 
carbohydrates, fats and oils, cereals, nitrogenous bodies, preservatives, 
and colors. II, (5). Prerequisite: Chemistry 24 and 33 or 34. Associate 
Professor Englis. 

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 

36. Organic Chemistry. — Second course. Lectures and recitations. S, I, and II, 

(3). Prerequisite: Chemistry 34. Professor Marvel; (S, Dr. Emerson). 

37. Organic Chemistry. — Organic synthesis. Laboratory, to accompany Chem- 

istry 36. S, I, and II, (2). Prerequisite: Chemistry 34; registration or 
credit in Chemistry 36. Dr. Emerson and assistants. 

38. Systematic Identification of Organic Compounds. — S, I, and II, (3). 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 36 and 37. Professors Shriner and Fuson ; (S, 
Dr. Price) ; and assistants. 

PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY 

40. Elementary Physical Chemistry. — Lectures and problems. S, I, and II, (3). 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 24; Physics la-lb or 7a-7b ; Mathematics 7 or 
8a-8b. Professors Rodebush and Phipps; (S. Dr. Wall). 

41. Elementary Physical Chemistry. — Laboratory, to accompany Chemistry 

40. S, I, and II, (1). Prerequisite: Chemistry 24; Physics la-lb or 7a-7b ; 
Mathematics 7 or 8a-8b. Professor Phipps, Dr. Eddy, and assistants. 

42. Elementary Physical Chemistry.— Lecture. Continuation of Chemistry 40. 

S, I, and II, (3). Prerequisite: Chemistry 40. Professor Phipps, Dr. 
Eddy. 

43. Elementary Physical Chemistry. — Laboratory, to accompany Chemistry 

42. S and II, (1). Prerequisite: Chemistry 40 and 41; credit or registra- 
tion in Chemistry 42. Dr. Eddy; (S, Professor Phipps) ; and assistants. 

44a. Advanced Physical Chemistry. — Thermodynamics and free energy cal- 
culations. S and I, (2). Prerequisite : Chemistry 40 and 41. Professors 
Rodebush and Phipps; (S, Dr. Wall). 

46b. Advanced Physical Chemistry. — Atomic structure. II, (2). Prerequisite: 
Chemistry 40 and 41. Professor Rodebush. 

49b. Chemistry of Colloids. — II, (3). Prerequisite: Chemistry 22 and 47, or 
equivalent. Professor Buswell. 

BIOCHEMISTRY 

50. Biochemistry. — Proteins, fats, and carbohydrates ; tissues, digestion, intestinal 
putrefaction, and feces ; quantitative analysis of gastric contents, blood, 
milk, and urine. Clinical aspects for prospective students of medicine. 
Lectures, demonstrations, conferences, laboratory, and readings. S, I, 
and II, (5). Prerequisite: Chemistry 24 or 22 and 33 or 34. Professor 
Rose, Assistant Professor Carter, Dr. Vestling, and assistants. 



56 University of Illinois 



51b. Biochemistry. Problems of Metabolism. — Micro-methods of blood and 
urine analysis, with their applications to metabolism and to the diagnosis 
and treatment of disease. Lectures, conferences, and laboratory. II, (3). 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 50. Assistant Professor Carter and assistants. 

52b. Biochemistry of Vitamins and Hormones. — Lectures. II, (3). Prerequi- 
site: Chemistry 50. Assistant Professor Carter. 

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

60a. Chemical Engineering Unit Processes. — Heat and material balances and 
design problems. Lectures and recitations. I, (3). Prerequisite: Chem- 
istry 63b. Assistant Professor Deem. 

61a-61b. Principles of Chemical Engineering. — Scientific principles in unit 
operations of chemical engineering. Lectures and laboratory. I and II, 
(3). Prerequisite: Chemistry 63b. Assistant Professor Comings. 

62a. Principles of Research and Development. — I, (2). Prerequisite: Chem- 
istry 63b or 67b. Professor Keyes. 

63b. Introduction to Chemical Engineering. — Unit operations, equipment, and 
calculations. Lectures. S and II, (3). Prerequisite: Junior standing; 
Chemistry 40. Assistant Professor Deem; (S, Professor Keyes). 

64b. High Pressure Reactions. — II, (2). Prerequisite: Chemistry 34 and 44a. 
Assistant Professor Comings. 

65b. Chemical Engineering Calculations. — Applied thermodynamics. II, (3). 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 34 and 44a. Professor Johnstone. 

67b. Chemical Technology. — Modern industrial chemical processes. II, (3). 
Prerequisite: Chemistry 34 and 40. Assistant Professor Deem. 

68a-68b. Unit Operations. — Laboratory. I and II, (2). Prerequisite: Registra- 
tion or credit in Chemistry 61a. Assistant Professor Deem. 

69a-69b. Chemical Engineering Projects. — Laboratory. Development of an in- 
dividual project. I and II, (2). Prerequisite: Senior standing in chem- 
istry or chemical engineering. Professor Johnstone. 

70b. Economics of Chemical Engineering. — Lectures. II, (2). Prerequisite: 
Senior standing in chemistry or chemical engineering. Professor Keyes. 

71a. Applied Electrochemistry. — Lectures. I, (2). Prerequisite: Senior stand- 
ing in chemistry or chemical engineering. Associate Professor Swann. 

72a. Power Plant and Boiler Water Problems. — Lectures. I, (2). Prerequi- 
site: Senior standing in chemistry or chemical engineering. Associate 
Professor Straub. 

WATER CHEMISTRY 

49b. Chemistry of Colloids. — See under Physical Chemistry (above). 

86a. Chemistry of Water Treatment. — Methods for determining water quality ; 
special water requirements of industries, chemistry of water conditioning 
for municipal and industrial use; by-product recovery from industrial 
and other wastes. Lectures, demonstrations, and field trips. I, (3). Pre- 
requisite: Chemistry 24. Professor Buswell, Dr. Gore. 

miscellaneous 

95a. History of Science with Particular Reference to Chemistry. — Lectures 
and readings. I, (2). Prerequisite: Twenty hours of laboratory science; 
junior standing. Assistant Professor Bartow. 



Department of Chemistry 57 

Courses for Graduates 

Note: — Students who intend to take graduate work for an advanced degree in 
chemistry or chemical engineering should include in their undergraduate prepa- 
ration at least the equivalent of one full year of physics, one year of French, 
one year of German, and mathematics through differential and integral calculus. 
Any student without the necessary physics or mathematics may enter the Gradu- 
ate School but will be required to spend part of his time in residence to remove 
the deficiency. Without one year of college work in French or German (German 
preferred), no student will be admitted to the Graduate School as a candidate 
for an advanced degree in chemistry or chemical engineering. 

At the time of applying for admission to the Graduate School, each prospec- 
tive student should notify the Head of the Chemistry Department, stating the 
degree for which he wishes to study and the field of specialization. Neglect to 
do this may result in a delay before the student can begin his research, because 
of the limited space in the laboratories, or may make it impossible for him 
to continue his work for the Ph.D. degree. See regulations concerning research 
under Chemistry 190a-190b. 

Candidates for an advanced degree in chemistry or chemical engineering 
must have had the equivalent of 25 semester hours in chemistry, properly 
distributed. 

Candidates for the A.M. or M.S. degree with a major in chemistry or chemi- 
cal engineering must include among their courses Chemistry 40 and 41, or must 
have had the equivalent. 

Candidates for the Ph.D. degree in any branch of chemistry must include 
among their courses Chemistry 40, 41, 42, and 43, or must have had the 
equivalent. 

Candidates for the Ph.D. degree with a major in chemical engineering must 
have had undergraduate training comparable to that offered in the chemical 
engineering curriculum at the University of Illinois. They must include among 
their courses Chemistry 40, 41, 42, and 44a, or must have had the equivalent. 

Graduate students whose major subject is in some department other than 
chemistry, before taking chemistry courses for graduate credit, must have had 
the equivalent of fifteen semester hours in chemistry, and the ground covered 
should include satisfactory work in general chemistry and in qualitative and 
quantitative analysis and elementary organic chemistry. Such students are 
advised to make selections from the following courses: Chemistry 40, 41, 42, 
43, 27, 36-37, 50, 60a, 15b, 16b, and 29b. Courses of a more special nature will 
not as a rule, be accepted for graduate work unless preceded by one of the 
courses above. 

Those who intend to take a first minor in chemistry or any branch of chem- 
istry toward the Ph.D. degree must include among their courses Chemistry 40 
and 41, or must have had the equivalent. 

INORGANIC CHEMISTRY 

lOla-lOlb. Inorganic Chemistry. — The less familiar elements and their relation- 
ship in the periodic system. Lectures and recitations. S, I, and II, 
(1/2 unit). Dr. Taebel. 

102a-102b. Inorganic Chemistry. — Inorganic preparations and qualitative an- 
alysis of the less familiar elements. Laboratory, to accompany or follow 
Chemistry lOla-lOlb. S, I, and II, (\/ 4 to Y A unit). Dr. Taebel. 

105a-105b. Inorganic Chemistry. — Seminar. I and II, (14 unit). Professor 
Hopkins. 



58 University of Illinois 



106a-106b. Special Topics in Inorganic Chemistry. — Discussions and reports. 
I and II, (34 unit). Associate Professors Audrieth and Bailar, Dr. 
Nicholson. 

S107. Recent Developments in Inorganic Chemistry. — This course presents a 
study of the recent advances which have a bearing on the theoretical and 
descriptive material of general and inorganic chemistry and is designed 
particularly for the high school teacher. Lectures, discussions, reports, and 
assigned readings. S, (34 unit). Prerequisite: Graduate standing in 
chemistry, or consent of instructor. Associate Professor Bailar. 

115a. Inorganic Chemistry. — The periodic relationship of the commercially im- 
portant elements, their applications and compounds. Lectures, reports, 
and recitations. Students who have received credit in Chemistry 15a or 
15b are not allowed to take Chemistry 115a for credit. S and I, (34 unit). 
Associate Professor Bailar; (S, Dr. Nicholson). 

116a. Synthetic Inorganic Chemistry. — Laboratory. Advanced inorganic prepa- 
rations. S and I, (V4 to 34 unit). Associate Professor Audrieth; (S, Dr. 
Nicholson). 

ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY 

S120. Survey of Modern Analytical Chemistry. — Lectures and recitations. S, 
(34 unit). Associate Professor Reedy. 

121b. Qualitative Microanalysis. — Laboratory and conferences. II, (34 unit). 
Associate Professor Reedy. 

123a. Qualitative Analysis. — Advanced principles, calculations, methods, and 
applications. Required of majors and minors in analytical chemistry. Lec- 
tures. I, (1/2 unit). Associate Professor Reedy. 

124b. Quantitative Analysis. — Advanced principles, calculations, experimental 
methods, and applications. Required of majors and minors in analytical 
chemistry. Lectures. II, (1/2 unit). Professor Smith. 

124d. Quantitative Analysis. — Laboratory. Optional to accompany Chemistry 
124b. II, (I/2 unit). Professor Smith. 

125a- 125b. Analytical Chemistry. — Seminar. Special topics in analytical chem- 
istry. Required of all graduate students whose major or minor is analyti- 
cal chemistry. I and II, (14 to 1 unit). Professor Clark. 

126a. Quantitative Instrumental and Chemical Methods of Analysis in 
Chemical Research. — Spectroscopy, polarimetry, refractometry, spectro- 
photometry, colorimetry, microscopy, etc. Lectures and laboratory. S 
and I, (34 unit). Associate Professor Englis. 

127a-127b. Applied X-rays. — Lectures. S, I, and II, (1/2 unit). Professor Clark; 
(S, Dr. Gross). 

127c-127d. Applied X-rays. — Laboratory. Optional, to accompany Chemistry 
127a-127b. S, I, and II, (1/2 unit). Professor Clark, Dr. Gross. 

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 

130a. Organic Chemistry. — Survey of organic chemistry designed for first-year 

graduate students. I, (1 unit). Professor Fuson. 
S131. Recent Developments in Organic Chemistry. — Lectures, Discussions, and 

reports. S, (34 unit). Prerequisite: One year of organic chemistry 

(Chemistry 36, or equivalent). Professor Marvel. 
132b. Organic Chemistry. — Advanced survey of organic chemistry (to follow 

Chemistry 130a). Lectures. II, (1 unit). Professor Shriner. 



Department of Chemistry 59 

133a. Organic Chemistry. — Optical isomerism, cis-trans isomerism, tautomerism, 

chemistry of the carbohydrates, etc. Lectures. I, (24 unit). Professor 

Adams. 
134a- 134b. Organic Chemistry. — Advanced organic synthesis. Laboratory. S, I, 

and II, (1/4 to 1 unit). Professor Fuson ; (S, Professor Marvel, Dr. 

Snyder). 
135a-135b. Organic Chemistry. — Seminar. Current literature. I and II, (V4 

unit). Professor Adams. 
136b. Organic Chemistry. — Newer methods in organic laboratory procedure. 

Lectures and laboratory. II, (24 unit). Professor Shriner. 

PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY 

144a-144b. Physical Chemistry. — Kinetic theory, statistical mechanics, molecular 
dynamics. Lectures. I and II, (24 unit). Dr. Wall. 

145a-145b. Physical Chemistry. — Seminar. Recent developments. I and II, (24 
unit). Professor Rodebush. 

[S146. Atomic Structure. — Includes a review of recent work upon the structure 
of the nucleus, isotopes, ultimate particles and nuclear transformation, in- 
volving neutrons. Non-mathematical. This course is intended to familiarize 
teachers of chemistry with as much of the recent work in chemistry and 
chemical physics as may be understood without extensive mathematical 
preparation. S, (24 unit). Not given in 1940. Professor Rodebush.] 

biochemistry 

150b. Biochemistry. — Chemistry of intermediary metabolism. Lectures, discus- 
sions, and readings. II, (24 unit). Professor Rose. 

152a-152b. Biochemistry. — Difficult biochemical preparations; analytical methods. 
Chiefly laboratory. S, I, and II, (Vi to 1 unit). Professor Rose; (S, Dr. 
Vestling). 

155a-155b. Biochemistry. — Seminar. Current literature. Required of all gradu- 
ate students Whose major is biochemistry. I and II, (24 unit). Professor 
Rose. 

chemical engineering 

160a. Flow of Fluids. — Lectures. Especially designed for first-year graduate 
students. I, (1/2 unit). Prerequisite: Chemistry 61a. Professor Keyes. 

161a. Heat Transmission. — Lectures. Especially designed for first-year graduate 
students. I, (1/2 unit). Prerequisite: Chemistry 61a. Assistant Professor 
Comings. 

S162. Modern Industrial Chemical Processes. — Especially designed for teach- 
ers of chemistry. A non-mathematical discussion of recent industrial 
developments in organic and inorganic chemistry. S, (24 unit). Professor 
Keyes. 

[163a. Evaporation, Drying, Humidification, and Dehumidification. — Lectures. 
I, (1/4 unit). Prerequisite: Chemistry 61b. Given in alternate years; not 
given in 1940-1941. Professor Johnstone.] 

164a. Absorption and Extraction. — Lectures. I, (1/2 unit) . Prerequisite: Chem- 
istry 61b. Given in 1940-1941 and in alternate years. Professor Johnstone. 

165a-165b. Chemical Engineering. — Seminar. Required of all graduate students 
whose major is chemical engineering. I and II, (14 unit). Professor 
Keyes. 



60 University of Illinois 



166b. Filtration and Separation. — Lectures. II, (1/2 unit). Prerequisite: 
Chemistry 61b. Given in 1940-1941 and in alternate years. Professor 
Johnstone. 

[167b. Distillation. — Lectures. II, O/2 unit). Prerequisite: Chemistry 61b. 
Given in alternate years; not given in 1940-1941. Professor Keyes.] 

[168b. Economic Balance and Plant Design. — Lectures. II, (1/2 unit). Pre- 
requisite: Chemistry 61b. Given in alternate years; not given in 1940- 
1941. Professor Johnstone.] 

169b. Catalysis. — Lectures. II, (1/2 unit). Given in 1940-1941 and in alternate 
years. Professor Keyes. 

SANITARY CHEMISTRY 

185a-185b. The Chemistry of Water Treatment. — Seminar. Special problems 
and new developments in sanitary chemistry. I and II, (Vi to l^/\ units). 
Professor Buswell. 

MISCELLANEOUS 

190a-190b. Research. — Candidates for the A.M. or M.S. degree who elect re- 
search are required to present a thesis. A thesis is always required of 
students taking the Ph.D. degree. Not all candidates for thesis work 
necessarily will be accepted. Students whose major is in departments 
other than chemistry must receive permission from the Head of the 
Chemistry Department to register in this course. S, I, and II. Work may 
be taken in the following fields, subject to the approval of one of the 
qualified staff members: 
Physical and Electrochemistry. — Professors Rodebush and Phipps, Dr. 

Wall. 
Inorganic Chemistry. — Professor Hopkins, Associate Professors Reedy, 

Audrieth, and Bailar, Dr. Nicholson. 
Analytical Chemistry. — Professors Clark and Smith, Associate Pro- 
fessors Reedy and Englis. 
Food Chemistry. — Associate Professor Englis. 
Applied X-rays. — Professor Clark. 
Organic Chemistry. — Professors Adams, Marvel, Fuson, and Shriner, 

Dr. Price, Dr. Snyder, Dr. Emerson. 
Colloid Chemistry; Water Chemistry; Zymochemistry. — Professor 

Buswell. 
Phytochemistry. — Associate Professor Englis. 
Biochemistry. — Professor Rose, Assistant Professor Carter. 
Chemical Engineering. — Professors Keyes and Johnstone, Associate 

Professors Swann and Straub, Assistant Professor Comings. 
Ceramic Chemistry. — Professor Parmelee. 
192a. Chemical Literature and Reference Work. — I, (14 unit). Assistant Pro- 
fessor Bartow. 



SCIENTIFIC PUBLICATIONS 

The following is a list of publications by members of the Depart- 
ment of Chemistry from its organization to January 1, 1941. 

1870 

Stuart, A. P. S. On the Organic Matter of Soils, 111. Ind. Univ. 3rd Rept., 291. 

1872 

Stuart, A. P. S. On the Origin and the Physical and Chemical Properties of the 
Inorganic Matter of Soils, 111. Ind. Univ. 4th Rept., 180. 

1873 

Stuart, A. P. S. On the Distribution of Nitrous Acid in Plants, Trans. 111. State 
Hort. Soc. 7, 244. 

1874 

Stuart, A. P. S. On the Influence of Light in the Growth of Plants, Prairie 
Farmer. 

1878 

Scovell, M. A. Soil Analysis, 111. Ind. Univ. Rept., 177. 

1880 

Scovell, M. A. Shrinkage of Corn, 111. Ind. Univ. Rept., 109. Analyses of Soils 
from the University Farm, 111. Ind. Univ. Rept. 

Weber, H. A. Contamination of Well and Cistern Water by Organic Matter, 111. 
Ind. Univ. Rept., 103. 

Weber, H. A. Determination of Organic Matter in River Water, etc., 111. Ind. 
Univ. Rept., 104. 

Weber, H. A. Notes on Aragonite, 111. Ind. Univ. Rept., 105. 

Weber, H. A. On the "Flash Test" of Kerosene, 111. Ind. Univ. Rept., 106. 

Weber, H. A. and Scovell, M. A. Chemical Analyses of, and Practical Experi- 
ments with, Sorghum Cane, Grown on the University Farm, 111. Ind. Univ. 
Rept., 112. 

1882 

Weber, H. A. and Scovell, M. A. Report on the Manufacture of Sugar, Syrup 
and Glucose from Sorghum, 111. Ind. Univ. Rept., 71. 

1884 

McMurtrie, E. M. Chemistry of the Hog, 111. Ind. Univ. Rept., 153. Supple- 
mentary paper. Appendix. 

1886 

Parr, S. W. A Test of Certain Methods for the Estimation of the Several Al- 
buminoids in Cows' Milk, etc., Am. Chem. J. 7 , 246. 

1892 

Palmer, A. W. A Note Upon the Reduction of Symmetrical Triamido-Trinitro- 
benzene, Am. Chem. J. 14, 377. 

1893 

Palmer, A. W. and Grindley, H. S. Ueber die oxidation von pentamidobenzol, 
Ber. 26, 2304. 

1894 

Palmer, A. W. Dimethylarsin, Ber. 27, 1378. 

61 



62 University of Illinois 



1896 

Grindley, H. S. and Sam mis, J. L. Action of Mercaptids on Quinones, Am. 

Chem. J. 19, 290. 
Palmer, A. W. and Brenke, W. C. Ueber Symmetrisches Triamidotoluol, Ber. 

29, 1346. 

1897 

Palmer, A. W. Chemical Survey of the Water Supplies of Illinois, Univ. of 111. 

Water Survey, Bulletin 1, 98 pp. 
Parr, S. W. Sodium Peroxide as a Third Group Reagent, J.A.C.S. 19, 123. 

1898 

Grindley, H. S. A Study of Foods. Published by the Dept. of Chem., Univ. of 
111., Circular, 7 pp. 

1899 

Grindley, H. S. Analysis of Foods. Published by the Dept. of Chem., Univ. of 
111., Circular, 14 pp. 

1900 

Grindley, H. S. and Sammis, J. L. Nutrition Investigations, U. S. Dept. of Agr. 

Expt. Sta., Bulletin 91, 1. 
Parr, S. W. A New Coal Calorimeter, J.A.C.S. 22, 646 
Parr, S. W. A New Volumetric Method for the Estimation of Copper, J.A.C.S. 

22, 685. 

1901 
Grindley, H. S., McCormack, H., and Porter, H. S. Experiments on Losses in 

Cooking Meats, U. S. Dept. of Agr. Expt. Sta., Bulletin 102, 1. 
Palmer, A. W. and Dehn, W. M. Ueber Primare Arsine, Ber. 34, 3594. 

1902 

Palmer, A. W. Chemical Survey of the Waters of Illinois, Rept. for 1892-1902, 
Univ. of 111., Bulletin, 254 pp. 

Palmer, A. W. Report of the University of Illinois in Chicago Sanitary District 
Report of Streams Examination, Dec. 1902, pp. 43-96. 

Parr, S. W. Chemical Analysis and Heating Value of Illinois Coals, Bull, of 
Bureau of Labor Statistics, 20th Annual Coal Rept., Springfield, 111. 

Parr, S. W. A Note on the Volumetric Determination of Copper, J.A.C.S. 24, 580. 

Parr, S. W. The Peroxide Calorimeter as Applied to European Coals and Pe- 
troleum, J.A.C.S. 24, 167. 

Parr, S. W. and Koch, F. C. Chemical Composition of Illinois Coals, Bull, of 
Bureau of Labor Statistics, 20th Annual Coal Rept., Springfield, 111. 

1903 

Grindley, H. S. and Mojonnier, T. The Artificial Method for Determining the 
Ease and the Rapidity of the Digestion of Meats, The University Studies, 
Univ. of 111. 1, 185. 

1904 

Grindley, H. S. A Study of the Nitrogenous Constituents of Meats, U. S. Dept'. 

of Agr., Bur. of Chem., Bulletin 81, 110. 
Grindley, H. S. The Nitrogenous Constituents of Flesh, J.A.C.S. 26, 1086. 
Grindley, H. S. and Mojonnier, T. Experiments on Losses in Cooking Meats, 

U. S. Dept. of Agr. Expt. Sta., Bulletin 141, 1. 
Lincoln, A. T. The Ternary System: Benzene, Acetic Acid and Water, J. Phys. 

Chem. 8, 248. 
Lincoln, A. T. and Barker, P. Determination of Phosphates in Natural Waters, 

J.A.C.S. 26, 975. 



Department of Chemistry 63 

Parr, S. W. Coals of Illinois: Their Composition and Analysis, Univ. of 111, 

Studies 1, 291. 
Parr, S. W. Determination of Total Carbon in Coal and Soil, J.A.C.S. 26, 294. 
Parr, S. W. and McClure, C H. The Photometric Determination of Sulfur in 

Coal, J.A.C.S. 26, 1139. 
Walton, J. H., Jr. Die Jodionenkatalyse des Wasserstoffsuperoxyds, Z. physik. 

Chem. 27, 185. 

1905 

Curtiss, R. S. A Convenient and Practical Method for Making the Ester of Mes- 
oxalic Acid, Am. Chem. J. 33, 603. 

Dehn, W. M. Primary Arsines, Am. Chem. J. 33, 101. 

Grindley, H. S. Improved Methods for the Analysis of Animal Substances, 
J.A.C.S. 27, 658. 

Grindley, H. S. and Emmett, A. D. The Chemistry of Flesh. II. Improved 
Methods for the Analysis of Animal Substances, J.A.C.S. 27, 658. 

Grindley, H. S. and Emmett, A. D. On the Presence of Cottonseed Oil in Lards 
from Hogs Fed Upon Cottonseed Meal, J.A.C.S. 27, 263. 

Grindley, H. S. and Emmett, A. D. Studies on the Influence of Cooking Upon 
the Nutritive Value of Meats, U. S. Dept. of Agr. Expt. Sta., Bulletin 162. 

Sammis, J. L. The Action of Mercaptides on Quinones, J.A.C.S. 27, 1120. 

Smith, G. McP. On the Reciprocal Replacement of the Metals in Aqueous Solu- 
tions, J.A.C.S. 27, 540. 

1906 

Bartow, E. Chemical and Biological Survey of the Waters of Illinois, Rept. for 

year ending August 31, 1906, 111. State Water Survey, Bulletin 3. 
Bartow, E. Discussion of Water Softening, Proc. of the Am. Water Works 

Assoc. 26, 135. 
Bartow, E. The State Water Survey; What It Is and What It Is Doing, 21st 

Ann. Rept., 111. Soc. Eng. Surveyors, p. 68. 
Bryan, T. J. A Delivery Funnel for Introducing Liquids Under Increased or 

Diminished Pressure, J.A.C.S. 28, 80. 
Curtiss, R. S. Amine Derivitives of Mesoxalic Esters, Am. Chem. J. 35, 354. 
Curtiss, R. S. The Reaction of Nitrous Anhydride with Ethyl Malonate, Am. 

Chem. J. 35, 477. 
Dehn, W. M. Eine bequeme urometer-form und eine genaue Abanderung der 

Hypobromitmethode, Z. anal. Chem. 45, 604. 
Dehn, W. M. and McGrath, S. J. Arsonic and Arsinic Acids, J.A.C.S. 28, 347. 
Dehn, W. M. and Wilcox, B. B. Secondary Arsines, Am. Chem. J. 35, 1. 
Grindley, H. S. and Clark, S. C. Elementary General Chemistry. Published by 

the Dept. of Chem., Univ. of 111. 
Grindley, H. S. and Clark, S. C. Experiments in General Chemistry. Published 

by the Dept. of Chem., Univ. of 111. 
Grindley, H. S. and Trowbridge, P. F. The Chemistry of Flesh. IV. A study 

of the Proteids of Beef Flesh, J.A.C.S. 28, 469. 
Grindley, H. S., Clark, S. C, and Redenbaugh, W. A. Qualitative Chemi- 
cal Analysis. Rev. Ed. Pub. by Dept. of Chem., Univ. of 111. 
Grindley, H. S. and Emmett, A. D. A Study of the Phosphorus Contents of 

Flesh, J.A.C.S. 28, '25. 
Parr, S. W. Anthracizing Bituminous Coals, 111. State Geol. Survey, Bulletin 

4, 196. 
Parr, S. W. Chemical Analysis of Certain Coals, 111. State Geol. Survey, Bulletin 

4, 188. 
Parr, S. W., Breckenridge, L. P., and Dirks, H. B. Fuel Tests with Illinois 

Coals, Univ. of 111. Eng. Expt. Sta., Bulletin 7. 
Parr, S. W. The Classification of Coals, J.A.C.S. 28, 1425. 
Parr, S. W. The Coals of Illinois, Eng. and Min. J. 81, 86. 



64 University of Illinois 



Parr, S. W. Composition and Character of Illinois Coals, 111. State Geol. Survey, 

Bulletin 3, 27. 
Parr, S. W. Some Notes on the Service Waters of a Railway System, J.A.C.S. 

28, 640. 
Redenbaugh, W. A. Report of Committee on Chemistry Appointed at High 

School Conference, Feb. 1905, High School Manual issued by Univ. of 111. 
Smith, G. McP. On the Constitution of Amalgams (Prelim. Paper), Am. Chem. 

J. 36, 124. 
Smith, G. McP. Constitution of Amalgams, Am. Chem. J. 36, 125. 
Woods, H. S. and Koch, W. The Quantitative Estimation of the Lecithans, 

J. Biol. Chem. 1, 203. 

1907 
Balke, C. W. and Clark, S. C. Exercises in General Chemistry, Univ. of 111. 
Bartow, E. Municipal Water Supplies of Illinois, Univ. of 111. Water Survey, 

Bulletin 5. 
Bartow, E. The Use of Copper Sulphate in Water Purification, 22nd Ann. Rept. 

of 111. Soc. Eng. Surveyors. 
Bartow, E. and Lindgren, J. M. Laboratory Experiments in Water Treatment, 

Proc. Am. Water Works Assoc. 27, 506. 
Bartow, E. and Lindgren, J. M. Some Reactions During Water Treatment, 

J.A.C.S. 29, 1293. 
Dehn, W. M. Some New Forms of Apparatus, J.A.C.S. 29, 1052. 
Dehn, W. M. A Gasometric Method for the Determination of Hydrogen 

Peroxide, J.A.C.S. 29, 1315. 
Dehn, W. M. and Heuse, E. O. Decomposition of Hydrated Ammonium Salts, 

J.A.C.S. 29, 1137. 
Dehn, W. M. and Davis, G. T. An Improved Method for the Preparation of 

Allyl Chlorides, J.A.C.S. 29, 1328. 
Grindley, H. S. and Emmett, A. D. Chemistry of Flesh. VI. Further Studies 

on the Application of Folin's Creatin and Creatinin Method to Meats and 

Meat Extracts, J. Biol. Chem. 3, 491. 
Grindley, H. S., Mojonnier, T., and Porter, H. C. Studies on the Effect of 

Different Methods of Cooking Upon the Thoroughness and Ease of Diges- 
tion of Meat, U. S. Dept. Agr. Expt. Sta., Bulletin 193, 1. 
Grindley, H. S. and Woods, H. S. The Chemistry of Flesh; Methods for the 

Determination of Creatinin and Creatin in Meats and Their Products, 

J.Biol. Chem. 2, 309 ; also Chem. News 95, 145. 
Lincoln, A. T. Electrolytic Corrosion of Brasses, Trans. Am. Electrochem. Soc. 

11, 43. 
Lincoln, A. T., Klein, D., and Howe, P. E. Electrolytic Corrosion of Brasses, 

J. Phys. Chem. 11, 501. 
Lincoln, A. T. and Klein, D. The Vapor Pressure of Aqueous Nitrate Solution, 

J. Phys. Chem. 11, 318. 
Lincoln, A. T. and Walton, J. H. Elementary Exercises in Quantitative An- 
alysis Primarily for Students of Agriculture, The Macmillan Company, 

New York. 
Parr, S. W. Available Hydrogen of Coal, J.A.C.S. 29, 582 
Parr, S. W. Coalite, Eng. and Min., J. 84, 734. 
Parr, S. W. Calorimeters, Power, June, 1907, 386. 

Parr, S. W. Constants and Variables of the Parr Calorimeter, J.A.C.S. 29, 1606. 
Parr, S. W. Heat Production and Constituents of Coal, Eng. and Min. J. 83, 

1242. 
Parr, S. W. Parr's Method for the Determination of the Heat of Combustion 

of Coal, Chem. Eng. 6, 253. 
Parr, S. W. and Francis, C. K. Artificial Modification of the Composition of 

Coal, 111. State Geol. Survey, Bulletin 8, 176. 
Parr, S. W. and Hamilton, N. D. The Weathering of Coal, Univ. of 111. Eng. 

Expt. Sta. ; also 111. State Geol. Survey, Bulletin 8, 196. 
Parr, S. W. and Wheeler, W. F. Alterations of the Composition of Coal Dur- 
ing Ordinary Laboratory Storage, 111. State Geol. Survey, Bulletin 8, 167. 



Department of Chemistry 65 

Parr, S. W. and Wheeler, W. F. Deterioriation of Coal Samples, Univ. of 

111., Bulletin 17. 
Parr, S. W. and Wheeler, W. F. An Initial Coal Substance Having a Constant 

Thermal Value, 111. State Geol. Survey, Bulletin 8, 154. 
Smith, G. McP. The Constitution of Ammonium Amalgam, J.A.C.S. 29, 844. 
Smith, G. McP. On Amalgams: The Hydrargyrides of the Alkali and Alkali 

Earth Metals, Am. Chem. J. 38, 671. 
Smith, G. McP. On Reversible Metallic Displacements in Aqueous Solutions, 

Am. Chem. J. 37, 506. 
Smith, G. McP. Uber Ammonium Amalgam, Ber. 40, 2941, 4298, 4893. 
Smith, G. McP. Erwiderung an Alfred Coehn, Ber. 40, 4298. 
Smith, G. McP. Ammonium Amalgam: Reply to M. W. Travers, Ber. 40, 4893. 
Smith, G. McP. and Withrow, J. R. Electrolytic Preparations of Amalgams, 

J.A.C.S. 29, 321. 
Walton, J. H., Jr. Colorimetric Estimation of Titanium, J.A.C.S. 29, 481. 

1908 

Balke, C. W. and Smith, E. F. Observations on Columbium, J.A.C.S. 30, 1638. 

Bartow, E. Character and Composition of the Incrustation from Discharge Pipe 
at Quincy, Illinois, Proc. of the Am. Water Works Assoc. 28, 172. 

Bartow, E. The Hardness of Illinois Municipal Water Supplies, Rept. of 111. 
Soc. Eng. Surveyors, 213. 

Bartow, E. Normal Waters of Illinois, Public Health Papers and Reports of the 
Am. Pub. Health Assoc. 33, Part 11, B. 

Bartow, E. Surface Water Supplies of Illinois, 23rd Ann. Rept., 111. Soc. of 
Eng. Surveyors. 

Bartow, E., Sellards, A. W., Bain, W. G., and Lindgren, J. M. Chemical and 
Biological Survey of the Waters of Illinois, Report from Sept. 1, 1906 to 
Dec. 31, 1907, Univ. of 111. Water Survey, Bulletin 6. 

Bartow, E., Palmer, A. W., Parr, S. W., and Udden, J. A. The Mineral Con- 
tent of Illinois Waters, Univ. of 111. Water Survey, Bulletin 4 

Curtiss, R. S. and Tarnowski, P. T. Methyl Mesoxalate and Some of Its 
Reactions, J.A.C.S. 30, 1264. 

Davis, G. T. A New Instrument for Reducing Gas Volumes to Standard Condi- 
tions, J.A.C.S. 30, 971. 

Dehn, W. M. Reactions of the Arsines, Am. Chem. J. 40, 88. 

Grindley, H. S. The Chemistry of Flesh, J.A.C.S. 30, 76. 

Grindley, H. S. and Gill, F. W The Determination of Ammonia in Meat and 
Meat Products, Science 27, 497. 

Grindley, H. S. and Hawk, P. B. On the Efficiency of Thymol and Refrigera- 
tion for the Preservation of Urine, as Shown by Comparative Analyses for 
the Various Nitrogenous Constituents at the End of 24, 48, 72, and 96 Hours, 
Abstract, Proc. Am. Soc. Biol. Chem. 1, 103. 

Grindley, H. S. and Mitchell, H. H. Analyses of Meat Extracts, U. S. Dept. 
of Agr. Expt. Sta., Bulletin 116, 45, 48, 50. 

Hawk, P. B. and Grindley, H. S. On the Efficiency of Thymol and Refrigera- 
tion in the Preservation of Urine as Shown by Comparative Analyses for 
the Various Nitrogenous Constituents at the End of 24, 48, 72, and 96 Hours, 
Proc. Am. Soc. Biol. Chem.; J. Biol. Chem. 4, IX. 

Hawk, P. B. and Hanzlik, P. J. The Uric Acid Excretion of Normal Men, 
J. Biol. Chem. 5, 355. 

Holmes, W. B. and Manuel, E. V. Action of Hydrochloric Acid on Manganese 
Dioxide, J.A.C.S. 30, 1192. 

Isham, H. and Aumer, J. Direct Combustion of Steel for Carbon and Sulphur, 
J.A.C.S. 30, 1236. 

Lincoln, A. T. and Bartells, G. C, Jr. Electrolytic Corrosion of Brasses in 
Synthetic Sea Water, J. Phys. Chem. 12, 550. 

Noyes, W. A. Chemical Publications in America in Relation to Chemical In- 
dustry, Science 28, 225. 

Noyes, W. A. Openings for Chemists, Science 27, 876. 



66 University of Illinois 



Parr, S. W. Boiler Waters (The Mineral Content of Illinois Waters) Univ. of 

111. Water Survey, Bulletin 4, 56. 
Parr, S. W. The Deterioration of Coal, J.A.C.S. 30, 1027. 
Parr, S. W. Sodium Peroxide in Certain Quantitative Processes, J.A.C.S. 30, 

764. 
Parr, S. W. Ueber die Parrsche Methode zur Bestimmung der Verbrennungs- 

waerme von Steinkohlen, Z. angew. Chem. 21, 970. 
Parr, S. W. and Francis, C. K. The Modification of Illinois Coal by Low 

Temperature Distillation, Univ. of 111. Eng. Expt. Sta., Bulletin 24. 
Smith, G. McP. Bemerkungen zu der Arbeit von Max von Wogau: Die 

Diffusion von Metallen in Quecksilber, Ann. Physik (4) 25, 252. 
Smith, G. McP. Ueber die Relative Bestandigkeit bzs. die konstitution der ver- 

dunnten amalgame der alkali — bzw. erdalkali metalle, Z. anorg. Chem. 58, 381. 
Walton, J. H., Jr. and Scholz, H. A. The Decomposition of Certain Minerals 

and Industrial Products by Means of Sodium Peroxide and Metallic 

Sulphides, Am. Chem. J. 39, 771. 
Wheeler, W. F. Pure Coal as a Basis for the Comparison of Bituminous Coals, 

Proc. Am. Inst. Min. Engrs. 19, 49 (Trans. Am. Inst. Min. Engrs. 38, 621). 
Wheeler, W. F. Studies in Illinois Coals. VIII. The Weathering of Coal, 

Trans. Am. Inst. Min. Engrs. 40, 57. 

1909 

Bartow, E. The Boiler Water, Proc. Am. Water Works Assoc. 28, 495. 
Bartow, E. Chemical and Biological Survey of the Waters of Illinois, Report 

for 1908, Univ. of 111. Bull., Water Survey, Series 7. 
Bartow, E. Methods of Water Analysis, Rept. Lake Mich. Water Comm. 1, 96. 
Bartow, E. Pure Water on the Farm, Orange Judd Farmer, August 28, p. 174. 
Bartow, E. Report of Water Conditions in Illinois, Rept. Lake Mich. Water 

Comm. 1, 40. 
Bartow, E. Suggested Disposal of Drainage at Tolono, Illinois, Proc. 111. Water 

Supply Assoc. 1, 160. 
Bartow, E. Water Problems of Illinois and Neighboring States, Am. J. Pub. 

Hyg. 19, 489. 
Bartow, E. Water Problems of Mexico, Proc. Am. Water Works Assoc. 29, 711. 
Bartow, E. and Rogers, J. S. Determination of Nitrates by Reduction with 

Aluminum, Am. J. Pub. Hyg. 19, 536. 
Curtiss, R. S., Koch, A. R., and Bartells, E. J. The Action of Hydrazin on 

Ethyl Mesoxalate, J.A.C.S. 31, 416. 
Curtiss, R. S. and Spencer, F. G. The Action of Alcohols, Acids, and Amines 

on Methyl Oxomalonate, J.A.C.S. 31, 1053. 
Derick, C. G. Review of Methods of Water-proofing Concrete Structures, Eng. 

Contracting J. 32, 175. 
Grindley, H. S. and Emmett, A. D. The Chemistry of Animal Feces. I. A 

Comparison of the Analysis of Fresh and Air-Dried Feces, J.A.C.S. 31, 569. 
Grindley, H. S. and Emmett, A. D. The Influence of Cold Storage Upon Flesh, 

Proc. Am. Soc. Biol. Chemists; J. Biol. Chem. 6, IX. 
Grindley, H. S. and Gill, F. W. The Determination of Total Sulphur in Urine, 

J.A.C.S. 31, 52; J. Biol. Chem. 6, XI. 
Grindley, H. S. and Gill, F. W. The Preservation of Urine by Thymol and 

Refrigeration, J.A.C.S. 31, 695. 
Hawk, P. B. Practical Physiological Chemistry, 2nd Ed., Blakiston's Sons and 

Co., Philadelphia. 
Hawk, P. B. and Howe, P. E. Comparative Tests of Spiro's and Folin's 

Methods for the Determination of Ammonia and Urea, J. Biol. Chem. 5, All. 
Hawk, P. B. and Hanzlik, P. J. The Uric Acid Excretion of Normal Urea, 

Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. Med. 6, 16. 
Hawk, P. B., Howe, P. E., and Rutherford, T. A. On the Preservation of 

Feces, Proc. Am. Soc. Biol. Chem. ; J. Biol. Chem. 6, XLIX. 
Hawk, P. B. and Rehfuss, M. E. A study of Nylander's Reaction, Proc. Am. 

Soc. Biol. Chem. ; J. Biol. Chem. 6, XXXI. 
Mears, B. The Preparation of Gooch Crucibles for Asphalt Analysis, J. Ind. 

Eng. Chem. 1, All. 



Department of Chemistry 67 

Noyes, W. A. Molecular Rearrangements, J.A.C.S. 31, 1368. 

Noyes, W. A. The Next Step in Publication for the American Chemical Society, 

J. Ind. Eng. Chem. 1, 148. 
Noyes, W. A. The Requirements of a First Course in Chemistry, School Sci. 

and Math. 9, 748. 
Noyes, W. A. and Derick, C. G. Molecular Rearrangements in the Camphor 

Series. II. Laurolene, J.A.C.S. 31, 669. 
Noyes, W. A. and Homberger, A. W. Molecular Rearrangements in the 

Camphor Series. I. Hydroxylauronic Acid and Isocampholactone, J.A.C.S. 

31, 278. 
Parr, S. W. Chemical Data as Related to the Power Plant, Trans. Am. Water 

Works Assoc. 29, 10. 
Parr, S. W. Specifications for the Purchase of Coal, Trans. 111. Water Supply 

Assoc. 1, 36. 
Parr, S. W. Weight of Carbon Dioxide with a Table of Calculated Results, 

J.A.C.S. 31, 2. 
Parr, S. W. and Barker, P. The Occluded Gases in Coal, Univ. of 111. Eng. 

Expt. Sta., Bulletin 32. 
Parr, S. W. and Ernest, T. R. Fire Test on Sand-lime Brick, Brick 31, 1. 
Parr, S. W., Ernest, T. R., and Williams, W. S. Studies in the Uses of 

Finely-divided Silica, J. Ind. Eng. Chem. 1, 692. 
Parr, S. W., Mears, B., and Weatherhead, D. L. The Chemical Examina- 
tion of Asphaltic Material, J. Ind. Eng. Chem. 1, 751. 
Parr, S. W. and Wheeler, W. F. A Series of Parallel Determinations with the 

Mahler and Parr Calorimeters, J. Ind. Eng. Chem. 1, 636. 
Parr, S. W. and Wheeler, W. F. The Ash of Coal and Its Relation to Actual 

or Unit Coal Values, J. Ind. Eng. Chem. 1, 636. 
Parr, S. W. and Wheeler, W. F. Unit Coal and the Composition of Coal Ash, 

Univ. of 111. Eng. Expt. Sta., Bulletin 37. 
Parr, S. W., Wheeler, W. F., and Berolzheimer, R. A Comparison of Methods 

for the Determination of Sulphur in Coal, J. Ind. Eng. Chem. 1, 689. 
Smith, G. McP. On a Phenomenon Observed in the Action of Hydrochloric 

Acid on Very Dilute Alkali Amalgams, J.A.C.S. 31, 31. 
Smith, G. McP. and Bennett, H. C. The Electrolytic Preparation of the Amal- 
gams of the Alkali and Alkali-earth Metals, J.A.C.S. 31, 799. 

1910 

Balke, C. W. The Atomic Weight of Tantalum, J.A.C.S. 32, 1127. 
Bartow, E. The Relation of the Typhoid Fever Death Rate to the Water Sup- 
plies of Illinois, J. Am. Pub. Hyg., p. 43. 
Curtiss, R. S. The Cause of Color in Organic Compounds, J.A.C.S. 32, 795. 
Derick, C. G. Molecular Rearrangements of Carbon Compounds, J.A.C.S. 32, 

1333. 
Grind-ley, H. S. The Preservation of Meats by Cold Storage, 111. Med. J., 17, 

152. 
Grindley, H. S. and Ross, E. L. The Determination of Inorganic and Organic 

Phosphorus in Meats, J. Biol. Chem. 8, 483. 
Hawk, P. B. Comparative Analyses of the Urine of the Fox, Dog, and Coyote, 

J. Biol. Chem. 8, 465. 
Hawk, P. B. Practical Physiological Chemistry, 3rd Ed., xviii-440 pp., Blak- 

iston's Sons and Co., Philadelphia. 
Hawk, P. B. Some Desirable Results Following Water Drinking with Meals, 

Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. Med. 8, 36. 
Hawk, P. B. and Fowler, C. C. Studies on Water Drinking. II. The Metabolic 

Influence of Copious Water Drinking with Meals, J. Exp. Med. 12, 388. 
Hawk, P. B. and Howe, P. E. A Study in Repeated Fasting, Proc. Soc. Biol. 

Chem. ; J. Biol. Chem. 7, XLVI. 
Hawk, P. B., Howe, P. E., and Mattill, H. A. Fasting Studies on Men and 

Dogs, Proc. Soc. Biol. Chem. ; J. Biol. Chem. 7, XLVII. 
Hawk, P. B., Howe, P. E., and Rutherford, T. A. On the Preservation of 

Feces, J.A.C.S. 32, 1683. 



68 University of Illinois 



Hawk, P. B. and Rehfuss, M. E. Nylander's Reaction in the Presence of 

Mercury or Chloroform, J. Biol. Chem. 7, 267. 
Hawk, P. B. and Rehfuss, M. E. A Study of Nylander's Reaction, J. Biol. 

Chem. 7, 273. 
Hawk, P. B. and Rulon, S. A., Jr. Studies on Water Drinking. IV. The 

Excretion of Chlorides Following Copious Water Drinking Between Meals, 

J.A.C.S. 32, 1686. 
Noyes, W. A. Molecular Rearrangements in the Camphor Series. V. Mech- 
anism of the Reactions by Which Laurolene Is Formed, J.A.C.S. 32, 1068. 
Noyes, W. A. Organic Chemistry for the Laboratory, 2nd Ed., xi-291 pp., 

Chemical Publishing Co., Easton, Pa. 
Noyes, W. A. A Text Book of Organic Chemistry, 2nd Ed., xvii-537 pp., Henry 

Holt and Co., New York. 
Noyes, W. A. and Derick, C. G. Molecular Rearrangements in the Camphor 

Series. III. Oxidation Products of 1- and d- Laurolene, J.A.C.S. 32, 1061. 
Noyes, W. A. and Homberger, A. W. Molecular Rearrangements in the Cam- 
phor Series. VI. Isocampholactone, J.A.C.S. 32, 1665. 
Noyes, W. A. and Knight, L. Molecular Rearrangements in the Camphor 

Series. VII. Derivatives of Isocamphoric Acid; 1-Dihydrohydroxycampho- 

lytic-Acid, J.A.C.S. 32, 1669. 
Noyes, W. A. and Kyriakides, L. P. Molecular Rearrangements in the Camphor 

Series. IV. Synthesis of Laurolene, J.A.C.S. 32, 1064. 
Noyes, W. A. and Kyriakides, L. P. Synthesis of the Dimethyladipic Acids, 

and Separation of the Racemic Acid into Optical Isomers, J.A.C.S. 32, 1057. 
Parr, S. W. Calorimetric Processes and Apparatus, J. Gas Lighting 112, 205. 
Parr, S. W. The Accuracy of Calorimeters, Black Diamond, Nov. 5. 
Parr, S. W. The Chemical Composition of Illinois Coal, 111. State Geol. Survey, 

Year Book, 1910, Bulletin 16, 203. 
Parr, S. W. A New Gas Calorimeter, J. Ind. Eng. Chem. 2, 337. 
Parr, S. W. and Wheeler, W. F. The Weathering of Coal, Univ. of 111. Eng. 

Expt. Sta., Bulletin 38. 
Smith, G. McP. Heterogeneous Equilibria Between Aqueous and Metallic Solu- 
tions: The Interaction of Mixed Salt Solutions and Liquid Amalgams (First 

Paper). A Study of the Reaction, KHg m + Na • <=* K • + NaHg n + (m-n) 

Hg, J.A.C.S. 32, 502. 
Smith, G. McP. Ueber heterogen Gleichgewichte zwischen metallischen und 

wasserigen Losungen: Die Einwirkung von flussigen Amalgamen auf 

gemischte Salzlosungen (erste Mitteilung), Z. fur physik. Chem. 73, 424. 
Smith, G. McP. Ueber das an Quecksilber reichste Lithiumamalgam, Z. 

anorg. Chem. 74, 172. 
Washburn, E. W. Ein einfaches System der thermo-dynamischen Chemie, 

beruhend auf einer Modification der Carnotschen Methode, Z. fur physik. 

Chem. 74, 385. 
Washburn, E. W. Der Einfluss von Salzen auf das Drehungsvermogen von 

Rohrzucker, Z. Ver. deut. Zuckerind 60, 381. 
Washburn, E. W. The Fundamental Law for a General Theory of Solutions, 

J.A.C.S. 32, 653; J. chim. phys. 8, 538; Z. physik. Chem. 74, 537. 
Washburn, E. W. The Significance of the Term Alkalinity in Water Analysis 

and the Determination of Alkalinity by Means of Indicators, Proc. 111. Water 

Supply Assoc. 2, 93. 
Washburn, E. W. A Simple System of Thermodynamic Chemistry Based Upon 

a Modification of the Method of Carnot, J.A.C.S. 32, 467. 

1911 

Bartow, E. and Birdsall, L. I. Composition and Treatment of Lake Michigan 

Water, Rept. Lake Mich. Water Comm. 2, 69. 
Bartow, E. and Corson, H. P. Analysis of Chemicals for Water Treatment, 

Proc. 111. Water Supply Assoc. 114. 
Bartow, E. and Millar, C. E. Extent and Composition of the Incrustation on 

Some Filter Sands, J. Ind. Eng. Chem. 3, 94. 



Department of Chemistry 69 

Bartow, E., Tonney, F. O., and Pearse, L. Report on the Sanitary Survey of 

Lake Michigan, Rept. Lake Mich. Water Comm. 2, 37. 
Curtiss, R. S., Hill, H. S., and Lewis, R. H. Keto Ester Addition Products 

with Aryl Amines and Alcohols, J.A.C.S. 33, 400. 
Curtiss, R. S. and Kostalek, J. A. Pseudo Acid Esters in the Mesoxalic Ester 

Synthesis, J.A.C.S. 33, 962. 
Curtiss, R. S. and Spencer, F. G. C. Methyl Phenyliminomalonate and Its 

Reactions, J.A.C.S. 33, 987. 
Curtiss, R. S. and Strachan, E. K. Condensations in the Mesoxalic Ester 

Series, J.A.C.S. 33, 396. 
Derick, C. G. Applications of Polarity Measured in Terms of a Logarithmic 

Function of the Ionization Constant, J.A.C.S. 33, 1152, 1162, 1167, 1181. 
Hawk, P. B. Fasting Studies. II. On the Catalase Content of Tissues and 

Organs After Prolonged Fasting, J.A.C.S. 33, 425. 
Hawk, P. B. Fasting Studies. V. (Studies on Water Drinking. XI.) The 

Influence of an Excessive Water Ingestion Upon a Dog After a Prolonged 

Fast, J. Biol. Chem. 10, 417. 
Hawk, P. B. and Mattill, H. A. Studies on Water Drinking. X. Fecal Output 

and Its Carbohydrate Content Under the Influence of Water, J.A.C.S. 33, 

2019. 
Hawk, P. B. Studies on Water Drinking. VI. The Influence of Moderate and 

Copious Water Drinking with Meals, Upon the Activity of the Pancreatic 

Function, Arch. Intern. Med. 8, 382. 
Hawk, P. B. A Modification of Wohlgemuth's Method for the Quantitative 

Study of the Activity of the Pancreatic Function, Arch. Intern. Med. 8, 552. 
Hawk, P. B. On the Differential Leucocyte Count During Prolonged Fasting, 

Proc. Am. Soc. Biol. Chem. ; J. Biol. Chem. 9, XXI. 
Hawk, P. B. Post-anesthetic Glycosuria, Arch. Intern. Med. 8, 39. 
Hawk, P. B. Urine Formation During Ether Anesthesia, Arch. Intern. Med. 8, 

177. 
Hawk, P. B. and Hattrem, W. M. Studies on Water Drinking. V. Intestinal 

Putrefaction During Copious and Moderate Water Drinking with Meals, 

Proc. Am. Physiol. Soc, Am. J. Physiol. 28, xxv ; Arch. Intern. Med. 7, 610. 
Hawk, P. B. and Howe, P. E. Fasting Studies. I. Nitrogen Partition and 

Physiological Resistance as Influenced by Repeated Fasting, J.A.C.S. 33, 215. 
Hawk, P. B. and Howe, P. E. Nitrogen Partition of a Fasting Man Following 

the Ingestion of a High Protein Diet. Supplemented by Comparative Data 

from the Subsequent Feeding Period, Pro'c. Am. Soc. Biol. Chem. ; J. Biol. 

Chem. 11, LXV. 
Hawk, P. B., Howe, P. E., and Mattill, H. A. Fasting Studies. III. Nitro- 
gen Partition of Two Men Through Seven-day Fasts Following the Pro- 
longed Ingestion of a Low Protein Diet ; Supplemented by Comparative 

Data from the Subsequent Feeding Period, J.A.C.S. 33, 568. 
Hawk, P. B. and Mattill, H. A. A Method for the Quantitative Determination 

of Fecal Bacteria, J. Exp. Med. 14, 433. 
Hawk, P. B. and Mattill, H. A. Studies on Water Drinking. VIII, IX, X. 

Influence of Copious and Moderate Water Drinking with Meals, J.A.C.S. 

33, 1978, 1999, 2019. 
Hawk, P. B. and Rulon, S. A., Jr. Studies on Water Drinking. IV. The 

Excretion of Chlorides Following Copious Water Drinking Between Meals, 

Arch. Intern. Med. 7, 536. 
Hawk, P. B. and Wills, F. The Stimulation of the Gastric Secretion Under the 

Influence of Water Drinking with Meals, Proc. Am. Soc. Biol. Chem. ; J. 

Biol. Chem. 9, XXIX. 
Hawk, P. B. and Wreath, S. R. Fasting Studies. IV. (Studies on Water 

Drinking. VII.) On the Allantoin and Purine Excretion of Fasting Dogs, 

J.A.C.S. 33, 1601. 
Noyes, W. A. and Smith, G. McP. The Elements of Qualitative Analysis, 6th 

Ed., 131 pp., Henry Holt and Co., New York. 
Parr, S. W. The Chemical Examination of Water, Fuel, Flue Gases and 

Lubricants. Private Publication, 2nd revision, Champaign, 111. 



70 University of Illinois 



Parr, S. W. The Determination of Volatile Matter in Coal, Ind. Eng. Chem. 3, 

900. 
Parr, S. W. A New Type of Gas Calorimeter, Progressive Age 39, 1059. 
Parr, S. W. Stoppage of Steam Pipes, Proc. 111. Water Supply Assoc. 3, 61. 
Parr, S. W. Valuation of Coal for Gas Manufacturers, 111. State Geol. Survey, 

Bulletin 20, 131. 
Parr, S. W. and Kressman, F. W. The Spontaneous Combustion of Coal, Univ. 

of 111. Eng. Expt. Sta., Bulletin 46. 
Parr, S. W. and Lindgren, J. M. The Determination of Nickel in Alloys, 

Trans. Am. Brass Founders' Assoc. 5, 120. 
Smith, G. McP. Uber das an Quecksilber reichste Lithiumamalgam, Z. anorg. 

Chem. 74, 172. 
Washburn, E. W. Caesiumnitrate und das Massenwirkungsgesetz, Z. Elektro- 

chem. 17 , 13. 
Washburn, E. W. The Laws of "Concentrated" Solutions. II. The Estimation 

of the Degree of Ionization of Electrolytes in Moderately Concentrated So- 
lutions, J.A.C.S. 33, 1461. 
Washburn, E. W. and MacInnes, D. A. III. The Ionization and Hydration 

Relations of Electrolytes in Aqueous Solution at Zero Degrees. A Caesium 

Nitrate, Potassium Chloride and Lithium Chloride, J.A.C.S. 33, 1686. 

1912 

Bartow, E. New Work of the State Water Survey, Proc. 111. Water Supply 
Assoc. 4, 34. 

Bartow, E. Sanitary Survey of the Mississippi River at Moline, Proc. 111. Water 
Supply Assoc. 4, 166. 

Burgess, L. L. and Kamm, O. Cobaltinitrites and Their Application to Analytical 
Chemistry, J.A.C.S. 34, 652. 

Derick, C. G. Correlation of Ionization and Structure. II. Negatively Substi- 
tuted Benzoic Acids, J.A.C.S. 34, 74. 

Hawk, P. B. A Note on a Glycogen-free Liver, J.A.C.S. 34, 825. 

Hawk, P. B., Howe, P. E., and Mattill, H. A. Fasting Studies. VI. Dis- 
tribution of Nitrogen During a Fast of 117 Days, J. Biol. Chem. 11, 103. 

Hawk, P. B. and Howe, P. E. Fasting Studies. IX. On the Differential Leuco- 
cyte Count During Prolonged Fasting, Am. J. Physiol. 30, 174. 

Hawk, P. B. and Howe, P. E. Studies on Water Drinking. XIII. (Fasting 
Studies. VIII.) Hydrogen Ion Concentration of Feces, J. Biol. Chem. 11, 129. 

Hawk, B. B. and Fairhall, L. T. Studies on Water Drinking. XII. The Normal 
Allantoin Output of Man as Influenced by Water Ingestion, J.A.C.S. 34, 546. 

Hawk, P. B. and Sherwin, C. P. Fasting Studies. VII. The Putrefaction Pro- 
cesses in the Intestine of a Man During Fasting and During Subsequent 
Periods of Low and High Protein Ingestion, J. Biol. Chem. 11, 169. 

Howe, P. E. The General Aspect of Fasting, Biochem. Bulletin 2, 90. 

Jesse, R. H., Jr. Some Tests on a New Calorimeter Bomb, Original Communica- 
tions 8th Intern. Congr. Appl. Chem. 1, 233 ; J. Ind. Eng. Chem. 4, 748. 

Noyes, W. A. Molecular Rearrangements in the Camphor Series ; Campholytic 
Acid and Related Compounds ; Walden's Rearrangements, J.A.C.S. 34, 1067. 

Noyes, W. A. A Possible Explanation of Some Phenomena of Ionization by the 
Electron Theory, J.A.C.S. 34, 633. 

Noyes, W. A. and Burke, C. E. Molecular Rearrangements in the Camphor 
Series. IX. Lauronolic Acid and Campholactone, J.A.C.S. 34, 174. 

Noyes, W. A., Gorsline, E. E., and Potter, R. S. Molecular Rearrangements 
in the Camphor Series. VIII. Camphonolic Acid and Camphonololactone, 
J.A.C.S. 34, 62. 

McFarland, D. F. and Hadley, H. F. The Use of the Higher Phenols in 
Testing for Free Lime in Portland Cement, 8th Intern. Congr. Appl. Chem. 
5,83. 

Parr, S. W. Calcium Carbonate as a Constituent of Coal Ash, Original Com- 
munications 8th Intern. Congr. Appl. Chem. 10, 215. 

Parr, S. W. The Causes for Variations in Volatile Matter Determinations, J. 
Ind. Eng. Chem. 4, 352. 



Department of Chemistry 71 

Parr, S. W. A New Alloy with Acid Resisting Properties, Original Com- 
munications 8th Intern. Congr. Appl. Chem. 2, 289 ; J. Ind. Eng. Chem. 4, 844. 

Parr, S. W. A New Calorimeter Bomb with Special Advantages as to Material 
of Construction and Method of Operation, Original Communications 8th 
Intern. Congr. Appl. Chem. 1, 389; J. Ind. Eng. Chem. 4, 746. 

Parr, S. W. The Resinic Bodies in Bituminous Coal, Original Communications 
8th Intern. Congr. Appl. Chem. 10, 225. 

Parr, S. W. The Storage of Coal, Proc. 111. Water Supply Assoc. 4, 49. 

Parr, S. W. and Olin, H. L. The Coking of Coal at Low Temperature, with 
a Preliminary Study of the By-Products, Univ. of 111. Eng. Expt. Sta., 
Bulletin 60. 

Washburn, E. W. and Bates, S. J. The Iodine Coulometer and the Value of the 
Faraday, J.A.C.S. 34, 1341 ; Trans Am. Electrochem. Soc. 22, 397. 

Weber, H. C. P. Atomic Weight of Bromine, J.A.C.S. 34, 1294. 

Weber, H. C. P. On a Modified Form of Stability Test, Original Communica- 
tions 8th Intern. Congr. Appl. Chem. 4, 147. 

1913 

Bartow, E. Experience of the State of Illinois with the Shallow Well, Trans. 

111. State Acad. Sci. 6, 45. 
Bartow, E. Rural Water Supplies, 111. Med. J., 1913. 
Bartow, E. Water Survey Report for 1912, Univ. of 111. Bull., Water Survey, 

Series 10. 
Bartow, E. Chemical and Biological Survey of the Waters of Illinois. Univ. of 

111. Bull., Water Survey, Series 9. 
Balke, C. W. and Egan, J. E. Observations on the Rare Earths. Yttrium 

Chloride and the Atomic Weight of Yttrium, J.A.C.S. 35, 365. 
Bates, S. J. The Calculation of Equivalent Conductance at Infinite Dilution, 

J.A.C.S. 35, 519. 
Curtiss, R. S. and Nickell, L. F. Ethyl Cyanotartrate and Its Reactions with 

Amines, J.A.C.S. 35, 885. 
Derick, C. G. and Bornmann, J. H. Molecular Rearrangements of Carbon 

Compounds. II. Aromatic (N) Acylamines and the Beckmann Rearrange- 
ment, J.A.C.S. 35, 1269. 
Hecker, C. H. A Study of Some New Alkyl Hydroxylamines, Am. Chem. J. 

50, 444. 
Hawk, P. B. and Bergeim, O. Inhibition of Enzyme Action by Lime-Softened 

Waters, J.A.C.S. 35, 1049. 
Hawk, P. B. and Bergeim, O. Studies on Water Drinking. XIV. The Digestive 

Efficiency of Saliva as Increased by Dilution with Water, J.A.C.S. 35, 461. 
Hawk, P. B. and Blatherwick, N. R. Studies on Water Drinking. XV. The 

Output of Fecal Bacteria as Influenced by the Drinking of Distilled Water 

at Meal Time, Biochem. Bulletin 3, 28. 
Jesse, R. H., Jr. The Composition of Insoluble Gases Formed by the Decom- 
position of Organic Matter, 111. State Water Survey, Bulletin 9, 47. 
Jesse, R. H., Jr. The Heat of Combustion of Ethylbenzene, J.A.C.S. 34, 1337. 
Jesse, R. H., Jr. Gases Formed in Anaerobic Sewage Decomposition, J. Ind. 

Eng. Chem. 5, 636. 
Noyes, W. A. A Textbook of Chemistry. 602 pp., Henry Holt and Co., New 

York. 
Noyes, W. A. Preliminary Report for the Committee on Coal Analysis of the 

American Society for Testing Materials and the American Chemical Society, 

J. Ind. Eng. Chem. 5, 6. 
Noyes, W. A. An Attempt to Prepare Nitro-nitrogen Trichloride, an Electromer 

of Ammono-nitrogen Trichloride, J.A.C.S. 35, 6. 
Parr, S. W. The Determination of Ash, J. Ind. Eng. Chem. 5, 523. 
Parr, S. W. Volatile Matter in Coal, J. Ind. Eng. Chem. 5, 522. 
Smith, G. McP. Heterogeneous Equilibria Between Aqueous and Metallic Solu- 
tions, J.A.C.S. 35, 39. 
Smith, G. McP. Uber die Einwirkung verschiedener Metalle auf Ferricyankali- 

umlosungen, Z. anorg. Chem. 82, 63. 



72 University of Illinois 



Thorp, L. Studies in the Cyclopentadiene Series. II. 2, 3-Dibenzoyl-5-Nitro- 

cyclopentadiene, J.A.C.S. 35, 1. 
Thorp, L. Studies in the Cyclopentadiene Series. III. Certain Derivatives of 2, 

3-Dibenzoyl-5-Nitrocyclopentadiene, J.A.C.S. 35, 3. 
Washburn, E. W. The Viscosities and Conductivities of Aqueous Solutions of 

Raffinose, J.A.C.S. 35, 750. 
Washburn, E. W. and Strachan, E. K. The Laws of "Concentrated" Solutions. 

V. Part I, The Equilibrium Between Arsenious Acid and Iodine in Aqueous 

Solution ; Part II, A General Law for Chemical Equilibrium in Solutions 

Containing Ions; Part III, The Energetics of the Reaction Between 

Arsenious Acid and Iodine, J.A.C.S. 35, 681. 
Washburn, E. W. and Bell, J. E. An Improved Apparatus for Measuring the 

Conductivity of Electrolytes, J.A.C.S. 35, 177. 
Washburn, E. W. and Williams, G. Y. A Precision Viscosimeter for the 

Measurement of Relative Viscosity and the Relative Viscosities of Water at 

0°, 18°, 25°, and 50°, J.A.C.S. 35, 737. 

1914 

Bartow, E. Laboratory Control of Water Supplies, J. Am. Water Works 

Assoc. 1, 720. 
Bartow, E. Possibilities of a Municipal Laboratory, 111. State Med. J. 26, S77. 
Bartow, E. Water Survey Report for 1913, Univ. of 111. Bull., Water Survey 

Series 11. 
Bartow, E. and Gelston, W. R. Relation of Sewer Outfall to Water Works 

Intake at Quincy, Proc. 111. Water Supply Assoc. 5, 187. 
Bartow, E. and Scholl, C. Comparative Value of a Calcium Lime and a 

Magnesium Calcium Lime for Water Softening, J. Ind. Eng. Chem. 6, 189. 
Bates, S. J. The Electron Conception of Valence, J.A.C.S. 36, 789. 
Bates, S. J. and Vinal, G. W. Comparison of the Silver and Iodine Volt- 
ameters and the Determination of the Role of the Faraday, J. Wash. Acad. 

Sci. 4, 69. 
Beal, G. D. Note on the Preparation of Collodion Membranes for Dialysis, J. 

Am. Pharm. Assoc. 3, 499. 
Beal, G. D. and Zoller, H. F. The Preparation of Pure Sucrose and Dextrose 

Caramels, J. Am. Pharm. Assoc. 3, 495. 
Derick, C. G. A Sensitive Criterion of the Precision and of Constant Errors in 

the Conductance Data of Weak Electrolytes ; The Determination of the 

Molar Conductance of Organic Electrolytes at Zero Concentration and a 

Study of the Correction for the Specific Conductance of the Conductivity 

of Water, J.A.C.S. 36, 2268. 
Hawk, P. B. and Blatherwick, N. R. Studies on Water Drinking. XVI. The 

Influence of Distilled Water Drinking with Meals Upon Fat and Carbo- 
hydrate Utilization, J.A.C.S. 36, 152. 
Hawk, P. B. and Blatherwick, N. R. Fasting Studies. XIII. The Output of 

Fecal Bacteria as Influenced by Low and High Protein Intake, J.A.C.S. 36, 

147. 
Hawk, P. B. and Howe, P. E. Variations in the Hydrogen-Ion Concentration 

of the Urine of Man Accompanying Fasting and the Low and High Protein 

Regeneration Periods, Proc. Am. Soc. Biol. Chem. ; J. Biol. Chem. 17, 

XL VIII. 
Hawk, P. B. and Ross, E. L. Postanesthetic Glycosuria as Influenced by Diet, 

Body Temperature and Purity of the Ether, Arch. Intern. Med. 14, 779. 
Hawk, P. B. and Sherwin, C. P. Studies on Water Drinking. XIX. Intestinal 

Putrefaction as Influenced by the Ingestion of Softened and Distilled 

Waters, J.A.C.S. 36, 1779. 
Hawk, P. B. and Sherwin, C. P. Fasting Studies. XIV. The Elimination of 

Urinary Indican During Two Fasts of Over One Hundred Days Each, 

Biochem. Bulletin 3, 416. 
Hawk, P. B. and Wills, F. Studies on Water Drinking. XVII. The Ammonia 

Output as an Index of the Stimulation of Gastic Secretion Following Water 

Ingestion, J.A.C.S. 36, 158. 



Department of Chemistry 73 

Hawk, P. B. and Wilson, D. W. Fasting Studies. XII. The Ammonia, Phos- 
phate, Chloride and Acid Excretion of a Fasting Man, J.A.C.S. 36, 137. 

Hawk, P. B. and Wilson, D. W. Studies on Water Drinking. XVIII. On the 
Relation Between Water Ingestion and the Ammonia, Phosphate, Chloride 
and Acid Excretion, J.A.C.S. 36, 1774. 

Honovski, B. R. Some Transformations of Ricinoleic and Oleic Acids. (Second 
Paper.) Action of Monopotassium Anilide and Potassium Phenolate Upon 
Dibromohydroxystearic and Dibromostearic Acid, J.A.C.S. 36, 1028. 

MacArthur, C. G. Brain Cephalin. I. Distribution of the Nitrogenous Hy- 
drolysis Products of Cephalin, J.A.C.S. 36, 2397. 

MacInnes, D. A. The Mechanism of the Catalysis of the Decomposition of 
Hydrogen Peroxide by Colloidal Platinum, J.A.C.S. 36, 878. 

Noyes, W. A. Report of the Joint Committee of the American Chemical Society 
and of the American Society for Testing Materials on Methods of Sampling 
and Analysis of Coal, W. A. Noyes, Chairman, and others, Proc. Am. Soc. 
Testing Materials 14, I, 409. 

Noyes, W. A. and Nickell, L. F. Molecular Rearrangements in the Camphor 
Series. XII. Derivatives of Isocamphoric Acid; Decomposition Products 
of Isoaminodihydrocampholytic Acid, J.A.C.S. 36, I. 

Parr, S. W. The Development of an Acid Resisting Alloy for a Bomb 
Calorimeter, Science 63, 773. 

Parr, S. W. Honeycomb and Clinker Formation, Proc. 6th Ann. Conv. Inter. 
Ry. Fuel Assoc, May, 1914, p. 19. 

Parr, S. W. The Purchase and Sale of Illinois Coal on Specification, 111. State 
Geol. Survey, Bulletin 29, 80 pp. 

Parr, S. W. Report of Committee E-4 on Methods of Sampling and Analysis of 
Coal: Report of Sub-Committee IV on Volatile Matter, Proc. Am. Soc. 
Testing Materials 14, I, 424. 

Parr, S. W. Report of Sub-Committee V on Fixed Carbon and Ash, Proc. 
Am. Soc. Testing Materials 14, I, 426. 

Parr, S. W. and Hadley, H. F. The Analysis of Coal with Phenol as a Solvent, 
Univ. of 111. Eng. Expt. Sta., Bulletin 76. 

Scholl, C. Perchloric Method of Determining Potassium as Applied to Water 
Analysis, J.A.C.S. 36, 2085. 

Smith, G. McP. The Ideal Diffusion Coefficient and a Fundamental Law Con- 
cerning the Diffusion of Dissolved Substances in Liquids, J.A.C.S. 36, 847. 

Smith, G. McP. Uber die Konstitution Einiger in Quecksilber Aufgeloster 
Metalle, Z. anorgan. Chem. 88, 161. 

Smith, G. McP. and Ball, T. R. The Volumetric Estimation of Titanium by 
Means of Ferric Chloride, J.A.C.S. 36, 1838. 

Thorp, L. and Kamm, O. A Study of the Mechanism of the Grignard Reaction, 
J.A.C.S. 36, 1022. 

Washburn, E. W. Introduction to the Principles of Physical Chemistry, Part I, 
183 pp., McGraw-Hill Book Co., New York. 

1915 

Balke, C. W. and Sears, G. W. The Atomic Weight of Tantalum, J.A.C.S. 37, 

833. 
Bartow, E. Bureaus of Water Supplies, Am. J. Pub. Health 5, 871. 
Bartow, E. Examination of Drinking Water on Railway Trains, J. Am. Water 

Works Assoc. 2, 74. 
Bartow, E. Finds Electrolytic Lime Sewage Treatment Little Better Than Lime 

Alone, Eng. Rec. 74, 596. 
Bartow, E. Observations of Some European Water Purification and Sewage 

Disposal Plants, J. Am. Water Works Assoc. 2, 13. 
Bartow, E. Purification of Sewage by Aeration in the Presence of Activated 

Sludge, J. Ind. Eng. Chem. 7 , 318. 
Bartow, E. The Treatment of Sewage by Aeration in the Presence of Activated 

Sludge, Met. Chem. Eng. 13, 901; Trans Am. Inst. Chem. Eng. 8, 119. 



74 University of Illinois 



Bartow, E. and Alvord, J. W. Sanitary Policy for Racine, Wis., Munic. J. 37, 

740. 
Bartow, E. and Bennett, A. N. The Arsenic Content of Filter Alum, J. Am. 

Water Works Assoc. 2, 585. 
Bartow, E. and Huenink, H. L. The Effect of the Mineral Content of Water 

on Canned Foods, J. Ind. Eng. Chem. 7 , 495. 
Beal, G. D. and Beebe, C. K. The Oil of the Wild Grape Seed, Vitis Riparia, 

J. Ind. Eng. Chem. 7, 1054. 
Broderson, H. J. Anhydrous Hydrazine as a Solvent, J.A.C.S. 37, 825. 
Grindley, H. S. Improvements in the Methods of Conducting Ordinary Feeding 

Experiments, Proc. Ann. Meet. Am. Soc. Animal Production, 1915, 73. 
Grindley, H. S., Joseph, W. E., and Slater, M. E. The Quantitative Deter- 
mination of the Amino Acids of Feeding Stuffs by the Van Slyke Method 

(First Paper), J.A.C.S. 37, 1778. 
Grindley, H. S., Ross, E. L., and Keith, M. H. Phosphorus Metabolism of 

Lambs, J. Agr. Res. 4, 459. 
Grindley, H. S. and Slater, M. E. The Quantitative Determination of the 

Amino Acids of Feeding Stuffs by the Van Slyke Method, J.A.C.S. 37, 2762. 
Hawk, P. B. and Foster, L. F. Gastro-Intestinal Studies. VII. The Utilization 

of Ingested Protein as Influenced by Undermastication (bolting) and Over- 
mastication (Fletcherizing), J.A.C.S. 37, 1347. 
Hawk, P. B., Howe, P. E., and Morgulis, S. Studies on Tissues of Fasting 

Animals, Biol. Bulletin 28, 397. 
MacArthur, C. G. and Luckett, C. L. Lipins in Nutrition, J. Biol. Chem. 20, 

161. 
MacInnes, D. A. Liquid Junction Potentials, J.A.C.S. 37, 2301. 
MacInnes, D. A. An Outline of the Physical Chemistry of Colloids, Trans. 111. 

State Acad. Sci. 8, 43. 
MacInnes, D. A. The Potentials at the Junctions of Salt Solutions, Proc. Nat. 

Acad. Sci. 1, 526. 
MacInnes, D. A. and Parker, K. Potassium Chloride Concentration Cells, 

J.A.C.S. 37, 1445. 
Noyes, W. A. The Valence of Nitrogen in Ammonium Salts, J.A.C.S. 37, 4. 
Parr, S. W. The Development of an Acid Resisting Alloy, Trans. Am. Inst. 

Metals. 9, 211. 
Parr, S. W. Report of Joint Committee on Coal Analysis of the American 

Society for Testing Materials and the American Chemical Society, Yearbook, 

Am. Soc. Testing Materials, 596. 
Parr, S. W. An Acid Resisting Alloy to Replace Platinum in the Construction 

of a Bomb Calorimeter, J.A.C.S. 37, 2515. 
Parr, S. W. and McFarland, D. F. The Analysis of Complex Alloys of the 

Chromium, Copper and Nickel Type, Trans. Am. Inst. Metals 9, 218. 
Smith, G. McP. The Effect Upon Their Solution Tensions of Dissolving the 

Alkali Earth Metals in Mercury and the Constitution of Such Solutions, 

J.A.C.S. 37, 76. 
Smith, G. McP. A Method for the Calculation of the Hydration of the Ions at 

Infinite Dilution and the Ideal Diffusion Coefficient as Applied to the 

Hydrodiffusion of Electrolytes, J.A.C.S. 37,722. 
Thorp, L. and Wildman, E. A. Syntheses in the Diphenylmethane Series, 

J.A.C.S. 37, 372. 
Thorp, L. and Brunskill, E. R. o- and p-Chlorobenzoylacetate Esters and 

Some of Their Derivatives, J.A.C.S. 37, 1258. 
Washburn, E. W. Introduction to the Principles of Physical Chemistry. 445 pp., 

McGraw-Hill Book Co., New York. 
Washburn, E. W. and Heuse, E. O. The Measurement of Vapor Pressure 

Lowering by the Air Saturation Method, J.A.C.S. 37, 309. 
W t ashburn, E. W. and Millard, E. B. The Ionic Hydration and Transference 

Numbers of Caesium Chloride, J.A.C.S. 37, 694. 
Washburn, E. W. and Read, J. W. The Freezing-Point-Solubility Law for 

Ideal Solutions, Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. 1, 224. 



Department of Chemistry 75 

1916 

Adams, R. and Beebe, C. H. Action of the Grignard Reagent on CN Com- 
pounds: Synthesis of Amidines from Cyanamides, J.A.C.S. 38, 2768. 

Adams, R. and Weeks, L. F. Action of Oxalyl Chloride on Primary, Secondary, 
and Tertiary Alcohols, J.A.C.S. 38, 2514. 

Balke, C. W. and Hopkins, B S. Purification and Atomic Weight of Yttrium, 
J.A.C.S. 38, 2332. 

Bartow, E. Chemical and Biological Survey of the Waters of Illinois, Univ. of 
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Bartow, E. The Latest Method of Sewage Treatment, J. Am. Water Works 
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Bartow, E. Water Survey Report for 1914, Univ. of 111. Bull., Water Survey 
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Bartow, E. and Hatfield, W. D. Fertilizer Value of Activated Sludge, J. Ind. 
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Bartow, E., Mohlman, F. W., and Schnellbach, J. F. Activated Sluge Experi- 
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Bartow, E. and Mohlman, F. W. Purification of Sewage by Aeration in the 
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Bartow, E. and Tanner, F. W. Bacteria in Deep Wells, Univ. of 111. Bull., 
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Bartow, E. and Weiland, H. J. Hydrogen Sulfide in the Well Waters of Chi- 
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Beal, G. D. and Brady, S. E. The Hydrochloride Method for the Determina- 
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Beal, G. D. and Lewis, H. F. Studies on the Quantitative Estimation of Alka- 
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Beal, G. D. and Muncie, F. W. Effects of Large Applications of Commercial 
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Deming, H. G. A Diagram for the Calibration of Apparatus, J. Ind. Eng. Chem. 
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Deming, H. G. Nomographic Charts, Univ. of 111. Press. 

Derick, C. G. and Bissell, D. W. Trimethylene Oxide. I. Preparation and 
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Derick, C. G. and Kamm, O. The Structure of the Dihydro-/3-Naphthoic Acids, 
J.A.C.S. 38, 400. 

Grindley, H. S., Mitchell, H. H., and Shonle, H. A. The Origin of the 
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Hopkins, B S. Description of the Chemical Laboratory of the University of 
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Hopkins, B S. and Balke, C. W. Purification and Atomic Weight of Yttrium, 
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Kamm, O. and McCluggage, H. B. The Structure of the Dihydro-a-Naphthoic 
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Lewis, H. B. The Metabolism of Sulfur. I. The Relative Elimination of Sulfur 
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Lewis, H. B. and Karr, W. G. A Comparative Study of the Distribution of Urea 
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Lewis, H. B. and Karr, W. G. Studies in the Synthesis of Hippuric Acid in the 
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Lewis, H. B. and Karr, W. G. Changes in the Urea Content of Blood and 
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Lewis, H. B. and Jewell, M. E. The Occurrence of Lichenase in the Digestive 
Tract of Invertebrates, Proc Soc. Exp. Biol. Med. 14, 59. 



76 University of Illinois 



MacArthur, C. G. Solubility of Oxygen in Salt Solutions and the Hydrates of 

These Salts, J. Phys. Chem. 20, 495. 
MacArthur, C. G. Influence of Strong Salt Solutions on the Spontaneous 

Oxidation of Pyrogallic Acid, Ferrous Sulfate and Fructose, J. Phys. Chem. 

20, 545. 
MacArthur, C. G. and Burton, L. V. Brain Cephalin. II. Fatty Acids, 

J.A.C.S. 38, 1375. 
MacArthur, C. G. and Darrah, J. E. Nitrogenous Constituents of Brain 

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McFarland, D. F. and Harder, O. E. A Preliminary Study of the Alloys of 

Chromium, Copper, and Nickel, Univ. of 111. Eng. Expt. Sta., Bulletin 93. 
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Soc. 29, 315. 
Mohlman, F. W. The English Incubation Test for the Putrescibility of Sewage 

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of Group I, Anions Whose Silver Salts are Insoluble in Nitric Acid, 

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1917 
Adams, R. Organic Chemical Reagents for Scientific and Technical Laboratories, 

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Adams, R. The Present Opportunity in Chemistry, Univ. of 111., Bulletin 15, 324. 
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Hopkins, B S. The Need of Unification of High School Courses in Physics and 

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of Cystine on the Balance of Nitrogen in Dogs, Maintained on a Low 

Protein Diet, J. Biol. Chem. 31, 363. 



Department of Chemistry 77_ 

Lewis, H. B. and Jewell, M. E. The Occurrence of Lichenase in the Digestive 

Tract of Invertebrates, J. Biol. Chem. 33, 161. 
Lewis, H. B. and Karr, W. G. The Phenol Excretion of Guinea Pigs Main- 
tained on an Exclusive Oat Diet, Am. J. Physiol. 44, 586. 
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MacInnes, D. A. The Periodic System and the Structure of Atoms, School 

Sci. and Math. 17, 435. 
MacInnes, D. A. and Braham, J. M. Heats of Dilution. I. A Calorimeter for 

Measuring Heats of Dilution. II. The Heat Dilution of Three-normal 

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MacInnes, D. A. and Kreiling, R. G. Improved Victor Meyer Vapor-Density 

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McFarland, D. F. A Laboratory Efficiency Test for Advanced Students in 

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Noyes, W. A. The Relation of Chemical Laboratories to the National Welfare, 

Science 46, 1. 
Noyes, W. A. and Marvel, C. S. Cyancarboxethyl 3, 3-Dimethyl Cyclopentanone, 

J.A.C.S. 39, 1267. 
Noyes, W. A. and Hopkins, B S. Laboratory Exercises in Chemistry, vi-91 

pp., Henry Holt and Co., New York. 
Noyes, W. A. and Skinner, G. S. An Efficient Apparatus for Fractional Dis- 
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Noyes, W. A. and Skinner, G. S. XIII. Molecular Rearrangements in the 

Camphor Series, J.A.C.S. 39, 2692. 
Parr, S. W. Embrittling Action of Sodium Hydroxide on Soft Steel, Univ. of 

111. Eng. Expt. Sta., Bulletin 94. 
Parr, S. W. Effects of Storage Upon the Properties of Coal, Univ. of 111. Eng. 

Expt. Sta., Bulletin 97. 
Sears, G. W. A Study of Tantalum Chloride with Reference to Its Use in the 

Determination of the Atomic Weight of Tantalum, J.A.C.S. 39, 1282. 
Smith, G. McP. Contamination of Precipitates in Gravimetric Analysis: Solid 

Solution and Adsorption vs. Higher Order Compounds, J.A.C.S. 39, 1152. 
Smith, G. McP. and Braley, S. A. Heterogeneous Equilibria Between Aqueous 

and Metallic Solutions ; the Interaction of Mixed Salt Solutions and Liquid 

Amalgams. IV. Study of the Ionization Relation of Sodium and Strontium 

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Smith, G. McP. and Ball, T. R. Heterogeneous Equilibria Between Aqueous 

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1918 

Adams, R. Manufacture of Organic Chemicals at the University of Illinois, 

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Adams, R. Organic Chemicals Available at the University of Illinois, J.A.C.S. 

40, 869. 
Adams, R. and Kamm, O. Organic Chemical Reagents. I. Dimethylglyoxime, 

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Adams, R., Kamm, O., and Marvel, C. S. Organic Chemical Reagents. II. 

Amylene, Tertiary Amyl Alcohol, J.A.C.S. 40, 1950. 
Adams, R. and Volweiler, E. H. The Reaction Between Acid Halides and 

Aldehydes. I, J.A.C.S. 40, 1732. 



78 University of Illinois 



Adams, R., Wirth, W. V., and French, H. E. Oxalyl Choride as a Reagent 

in Organic Chemistry, J.A.C.S. 40, 424. 
Baker, G. C. Some Factors in the Purification of Sewage by the Activated 

Sludge Process, 111. State Water Survey, Bulletin 16, 182. 
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40, 598. 
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Champaign, 111. 
Derick, C. G. and Hess, R. W. The Scale of Influence of Substituents in Paraf- 

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Greenfield, R. E. A Waterworks Laboratory, 111. State Water Survey, Bulletin 

16, 249. 
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40, 1619. 
Hopkins, B S., Kremers, H. C, and Engle, E. W. Purification and Atomic 

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Erbium: Ratio Er 2 3 : 2ErCl 3 , J.A.C.S. 40, 1615. 
Hopkins, B S. and Yntema, L. F. Separation of Holmium, J.A.C.S. 40, 1163. 
Jewell, M. E. Quality of Water in the Sangamon River, 111. State Water 

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Jewell, M. E. Experiments on the Preservation of Mud Samples, 111. State 

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Lewis, H. B. Some Analyses of the Urine of Reptiles, Science 48, 376. 
Lewis, H. B. and Doisy, E. A. Studies in Uric Acid Metabolism. I. The In- 
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II. Proteins and Amino Acids as Factors in the Stimulation of Endogenous 

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McFarland, D. F. Experimental Study of Extraction of Grease from Dried 

Activated Sludge, Univ. of 111. State Water Survey, Bulletin 15, 108. 
Mitchell, H. H. and Eckstein, H. C. A Foam Inhibitor in the Van Slyke 

Amino Nitrogen Me.hod, J. Biol. Chem. 33, 373. 
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Parr, S. W. Property of Certain Waters with Reference to Their Action on 

Metals, J. Am. Water Works Assoc. 5, 451. 
Parr, S. W. Some Developments in the Chemical Industries as a Result of War 

Conditions, Science 47, 399. 
Scholl, C. Radioactivity of Illinois Waters, 111. State Water Survey, Bulletin 

14, 114. 
Smith, G. McP. and Rees, E. A. Heterogeneous Equilibria. V, J.A.C.S. 40, 1802. 
Smith, G. McP. and Rees, E. A. Heterogeneous Equilibria Between Aqueous 

and Metallic Solutions: The Interaction of Mixed Salt Solutions and Liquid 

Amalgams, J.A.C.S. 40, 1802. 
Tolman, R. C. General Theory of Energy Partition with Applications to Quan- 
tum Theory, Phys. Rev. 11, 261. 
Tolman, R. C. and Stearn, A. E. Molecular Mechanism of Colloidal Behavior. 

I. The Swelling of Fibrin in Acids, J.A.C.S. 40, 264. 
Washburn, E. W. Ceramics and the War, Met. Chem. Eng. 18, 253. 
Washburn, E. W. The Determination of the Audibility Current of a Telephone 

Receiver with the Aid of the Wheatstone Bridge, Proc. Inst. Radio Eng. 

6, 99. 
Washburn, E. W. The Equivalent Conductance of Electrolytes in Dilute Aque- 
ous Solution. I. The Water Correction, J.A.C.S. 40, 106. 



Department of Chemistry 79 

Washburn, E. W. The Equivalent Conductance of Electrolytes in Dilute Aque- 
ous Solutions. II. The Extrapolation of Conductivity Data to Zero Concen- 
tration, J.A.C.S. 40, 122. 

Washburn, E. W. The Equivalent Conductance of Electrolytes in Dilute Aque- 
ous Solutions. IV. Two Laws Governing the Ionization Equilibrium of 
Strong Electrolytes in Dilute Solutions and a New Rule by Means of which 
the Equivalent Conductance at Infinite Dilution can be Determined from a 
Single Conductance Measurement, J.A.C.S. 40, 150; Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. 
3, 569. 

Washburn, E. W. The Organization of our Ceramic Resources for National 
Service, Clay-worker 69, 542. 

Washburn, E. W, II. The Telephone Receiver as an Indicating Instrument for 
use with the Alternating Current Bridge, J.A.C.S. 40, 235. 

1919 
Adams, R. Alkali Insoluble Phenols, J.A.C.S. 41, 247. 
Adams, R., Kamm, O., and Marvel, C. S. Organic Chemical Reagents, Univ. 

of 111., Bulletin 16, 43. 
Adams, R. and Rindfusz, R. E. Cyclic Ethers from o-allyl Phenols, J.A.C.S. 41, 

648. 
Adams, R. and Voorhees, V. Organic Chemical Reagents. IV. Preparation of 

Alkyl Iodides, J.A.C.S. 41, 789. 
Beal, G. D. Chemistry's Opportunity in Pharmaceutical Research, J. Am. Pharm. 

Assoc. 8, 260. 
Beal, G. D. and Glenz, E. A. The Composition of the Fruit of the Virginia 

Creeper, Ampelopsis Quinquefolia, J. Ind. Eng. Chem. 11, 959. 
Beal, G. D. and Okey, R. A Proximate Analysis of Rumex Crispus, and a Com- 
parison of Its Hydroxy-methyl-anthraquinones with Those from Certain 

Other Drugs, J.A.C.S. 41, 693. 
Bracewell, R. S. Molecular Mechanism of Colloidal Behavior. III. The 

Chemical Nature of the Adsorption of Acids and Alkalies by the Protein 

Molecule, J.A.C.S. 41, 1511. 
Braham, J. M. Some Physical Properties of Mannitol and Its Aqueous Solu- 
tions, J.A.C.S. 41, 1707. 
Braley, S. A. Bibliography on the Use of Cupferron as a Quantitative Reagent, 

J. Ind. Eng. Chem. 11, 1144. 
Greenfield, R. E. and Mickle, F. L. A New Sampler for Collecting Dissolved 

Oxygen Samples, 111. State Water Survey, Bulletin 16, 196. 
Hopkins, B S. Teaching Chemistry in the Laboratory, School Sci. and Math. 

19, 295. 
Hopkins, B S. and Kremers, H. C. Atomic Weight of Yttrium (Third Paper), 

J.A.C.S. 41, 718. 
Jewell, M. E. Quality of Water in Illinois Streams, J. Am. Water Works Assoc. 

6, 290. 
Kamm, O. and Marvel, C. S. Preparation of /?-Phenylhydroxvlamine and Cup- 
ferron, J.A.C.S. 41, 276. 
Lewis, H. B. The Antiscorbutic Value of the Banana, J. Biol. Chem. 40, 91. 
Lewis, H. B. and Root, L. E. Amino-Acid Synthesis in the Organism of the 

White Rat, Proc. Soc. Expt. Biol. Med. 17, 99. 
Mac Arthur, C. G. and Doisy, E. A. Quantitative Chemical Changes in the 

Human Brain During Growth, J. Comparative Neurology 30, 445. 
MacInnes, D. and Adler, L. Hydrogen Overvoltage, J.A.C.S. 41, 194. 
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51, 366; J. Am. Water Works Assoc. 6, 196. 
Noyes, W. A. College Textbook of Chemistry. 370 pp., Henry Holt and Co., 

New York. 
Noyes, W. A. Valence, Science 49, 175 
Noyes, W. A. and Hopkins, B S. Exercises in Chemistry, 2nd Ed., 131 pp., 

Henry Holt and Co., New York. 



80 University of Illinois 



Okey, R. E. Studies on the Behavior of Inulin in the Animal Body. I. Applica- 
tion of the Benedict Method to the Estimation of Levulose and Inulin, J. 
Biol. Chem. 38, 33. 

Okey, R. E. Studies on the Behavior of Inulin in the Animal Body. II. Inulin 
in the Alimentary Canal, J. Biol. Chem. 39, 149. 

Parr, S. W. A Fusion Bomb for Sulfur Determination in Coal, J. Ind. Eng. 
Chem. 11, 230. 

Parr, S. W. Low Temperature Distillation of Illinois Coals, Am. Inst. Min. Eng. 
143, 1695. 

Parr, S. W. A Needle Valve with Delicate Adjustment for High Pressure Gases, 
J. Ind. Eng. Chem. 11, 768. 

Parr, S. W. Preparing Coal Samples for Analysis, Power, 49, 928. 

Parr, S. W. Present and Prospective Status of the Gas Industry, Am. Gas Eng. 
J. 110, 66. 

Parr, S. W. and Powell, A. R. A Study of the Forms in Which Sulfur Occurs 
in Coal, Univ. of 111. Expt. Sta., Bulletin 111. 

Reedy, J. H. The Electrolytic Determination of the Halogens: An Indirect 
Method, J.A.C.S. 41, 1898. 

Rideal, E. K. Reactivity and Adsorption in Heterogeneous Catalysts, J. Am. 
Electrochem. Soc. 36, 195. 

Rindfusz, R. E. Syntheses of Chromanes and Coumaranes, J.A.C.S. 41, 665. 

Tolman, R. C. and Bracewell, R. S. Molecular Mechanism of Colloidal Be- 
havior. II. The Swelling of Fibrin in Alkalies, J.A.C.S. 41, 1503. 

1920 

Adams, R., Bramlet, H. B., and Tendrick, F. H. Reactions of the Grignard 
Reagent on Thiocyanates, J.A.C.S. 42, 2369. 

Adams, R., Kamm, O., and Marvel, C. S. Organic Chemical Reagents. II, 
57 pp., Univ. of 111. Press. 

Adams, R. and Marvel, C. S. Organic ChemicalReagents. VI. Reagents from 
n-butyl Alcohol, J.A.C.S. 42, 310. 

Adams, R. and Palmer, C. S. The Reactions of the Arsines; Condensation of 
Primary Arsines with Aldehydes, J.A.C.S. 42, 2375. 

Adams, R. and Powell, S. G. A Comparison of the Activity of Certain Un- 
saturated Groups with the Activity of the Allyl Groups in Certain Ethers, 
J.A.C.S. 42, 646. 

Adams, R. and Ulich, L. H. The Use of Oxalyl Chloride and Bromide for 
Producing Acid Chlorides, Acid Bromides or Acid Anhydrides. Ill, J.A.C.S. 
42, 599. 

Baker, G. C. Preparation of Ammonia-free Water, J. Ind. Eng. Chem. 12, 798. 

Bartow, E. and Habermeyer, G. C. Sanitary Districts in Illinois, Trans. 111. 
Sta. Acad. Sci. 13, 96. 

Bartow, E. and Greenfield, R. E., and Ely, H. M. Tastes and Odors in the 
Danville City Water During the Summer of 1919, Proc. of the 13th Ann. 
Conf. of the Indiana Sanit. and Water Supply Assoc. 115. 

Bartow, E. and Greenfield, R. E. Note of a New Indicator in Water Analysis, 
Trans. 111. Sta. Acad. Sci. 13, 326. 

Beal, G. D. and Hamilton, T. S. The "Shaking-out" Method for the Quantita- 
tive Estimation of Alkaloids. II. The Effect of Clarification and Salting 
Out, J. Am. Pharm. Assoc. 9, 9. 

Beal, G. D. and Perry, M. C. The Quantities of Preservatives Necessary to In- 
hibit and Prevent Alcoholic Fermentation and the Growth of Molds, J. Ind. 
Eng. Chem. 12, 253. 

Braley, S. A. and Hall, J. L. Transference Numbers in Mixed Salt Solution, 
J.A.C.S. 42, 1770. 

Feuer, B. Tests for Relative Corrosion, Chem. Met. Eng. 22, 1197. 

Greenfield, R. E. and Baker, G. C. Relationship of the Hydrogen Ion Concen- 
tration of Natural Waters to Carbondioxide Content, J. Ind. Eng. Chem. 
12, 989. 

Habermeyer, G. C. and Brensky, A. A. Public Water Supplies in Illinois, 
J. Am. Water Works Assoc. 7, 542. 



Department of Chemistry 81 

Hopkins, B S. How Our Teaching Should be Modified to Agree with Recent 

Developments in Chemistry, Proc. H. S. Conf., Univ. of 111., Bulletin 18, 272. 
Howell, L. B. Positive Halogen in Organic Compounds. Iodine in Diiodoacety- 

lene and Chloroiodoethylene, J.A.C.S. 42, 991. 
Kamm, O. Relationship Between Chemical Constitution and Physiological Action 

in Local Anesthetics. I. Homologs of Procaine, J.A.C.S. 42, 1030. 
Kamm, O. and Marvel, C. S. The Preparation of Alkyl and Alkylene Bromides, 

J.A.C.S. 42, 299. 
Kremers, H. C. The Spectroscope in the Elementary Chemical Laboratory, 

School Sci. and Math. 22, 40. 
Lewis, H. B. The Metabolism of Sulfur. III. The Relation Between the Cystine 

Content of Proteins and their Efficiency in the Maintenance of Nitrogenous 

Equilibrium in Dogs, J. Biol. Chem. 42, 289. 
Lewis, H. B. and Root, L. E. Amino-Acid Synthesis in the Animal Organism. 

Can Nor-leucine Replace Lysine for the Nutritive Requirements of the 

White Rat-? J. Biol. Chem. 43, 79. 
Lewis, H. B. and Stearns, G. Diet and Sex as Factors in Creatinuria in Man, 

Science 52, 565. 
Noyes, W. A. Chemical Publications, J.A.C.S. 42, 2099. 
Noyes, W. A. Organic Chemistry for the Laboratory, 4th Ed. rev., 293 pp., 

Chemical Publishing Co., Easton, Pa. 
Noyes, W. A. The Reaction Between Chlorine and Ammonia. Ill, J.A.C.S. 42, 

2173. 
Noyes, W. A. and Coss, J. A. The Decomposition of Nitroso Compounds. II, 

J.A.C.S. 42, 1280. 
Noyes, W. A. and Haw, A. B. The Reaction Between Chlorine and Ammonia. 

II, J.A.C.S. 42, 2167. 
Noyes, W. A. and Marvel, C. S. A Study of the Possible Asymmetry of the 

Aliphatic Diazo Compounds, J.A.C.S. 42, 2259. 
Parr, S. W. Sulfur in the Coking Process, Am. Inst. Min. and Met. Eng. 63, 630. 
Parr, S. W. and Layng, T. E. Low Temperature Carbonization of Coal, Min. 

and Met. 158, Sec. 4. 
Parr, S. W. and Powell, A. R. Forms in which Sulfur Occurs in Coal, Trans. 

Am. Inst. Min. and Met. Eng. 63, 674. 
Reedy, J. H. Passive State: A Review of the Theories, School Sci. and Math. 

20, 673. 
Reedy, J. H. and Feuer, B. Corrosion of Brass in Dilute Electrolytes, J. Ind. 

Eng. Chem. 12, 541. 
Rideal, E. K. Catalytic Hydrogenation with Protected Hydrosols, J.A.C.S. 42, 

749. 
Rideal, E. K. Overpotential and Catalytic Activity, J.A.C.S. 42, 94. 
Rideal, E. K. On the Absorption of Oxides of Nitrogen by Nitric Acid, J. Ind. 

Eng. Chem. 12, 531. 
Rideal, E. K. and Hawkins, J. A. Catalysis in Hydrolysis of Esters by Infra- 
red Radiation, J. Chem. Soc. 117, 1288. 
Rideal, E. K. and Kunz, J. On the Distribution of Ozone in the Direct Current 

Corona, J. Phys. Chem. 24, 378. 
Rindfusz, R. E. and Harnack, V. L. Heterocyclic Compounds of N-Arylamino 

Alcohols, J.A.C.S. 42, 1720. 
Smith, G. McP., Schneider, F. R., and Stearn, A. E. A Study of the Heats 

of Dilution of Barium Chloride and Barium-Sodium Chloride Mixture, 

J.A.C.S. 42, 32. 
Smith, G. McP. and Van Winkle, W. A. A Simple Rapid Method for the De- 
termination of Halogen in Organic Substances, J.A.C.S. 42, 333. 
Smith, G. McP. and Stearn, A. E. A Study of the Heats of Dilution of Certain 

Aqueous Salt Solutions, J.A.C.S. 42, 18. 
Smith, G. McP. and Wells, L. S. Heterogeneous Equilibria Between Aqueous 

and Metallic Solutions: The Interaction of Mixed Salt Solutions and Liquid 

Amalgams. VI, J.A.C.S. 42, 185. 



82 University of Illinois 



1921 

Adams, R. Invaluable Synthetic Drugs Discovered by U. S. Chemists, N. Y. 

Commercial, Sept. 12, 1921. 
Adams, R. The Physician and American Chemistry, Am. J. Clin. Med. 29, 85. 
Adams, R., Conant, J. B., Kamm, O., and Clarke, H. T. Organic Syntheses. 

I, 84 pp., John Wiley and Sons, New York. 

Adams, R. and Johnson, J. R. 2, Phenyl-Quinoline-4, Carboxylic Acid-6, 

Arsonic Acid, J.A.C.S. 43, 255. 
Adams, R. and Marvel, C. S. Organic Chemical Reagents. Ill, Univ. of 111., 

Bulletin 19, 6. 
Adams, R. and Quick, A. J. The Reaction Between Acid Halides and Aldehydes. 

II, J.A.C.S. 43, 651. 

Adams, R. and Ulich, L. H. The Reaction Between Acid Halides and Alde- 
hydes. Ill, J.A.C.S. 43, 660. 

Bartow, E. and Greenfield, R. E. Bacteriological Methods of Water Analysis 
Used in the American Expeditionary Forces, Am. J. Pub. Health 11, 65. 

Braley, S. A. and Hobart, F. B. A New Method for the Detection and Estima- 
tion of Cobalt, J.A.C.S. 43, 482. 

Braley, S. A. and Schneider, R. F. The Structure of Gold Amalgams as Deter- 
mined by Metallographic Methods, J.A.C.S. 43, 740. 

Greenfield, R. E. Effect of Hydrogen-ion Concentration in Water, Can. Eng. 
40, 335 ; J. Am. Water Works Assoc. 8, 397. 

Hopkins, B S. and Kremers, H. C. The Preparation of the Pure Rare Earth 
Elements, Part II of Scientific Papers of the Bureau of Standards 421, 337. 

Hopkins, B S. and Yntema, L. F. The Arc Spectrum of Yttrium, J. Optical 
Soc. Am. 6, 121. 

Kremers, H. C. Electric MufHe Furnaces for Laboratory Use, J. Ind. Eng. Chem. 
13, 6. 

Lewis, H. B. Studies on the Synthesis of Hippuric Acid in the Animal Organ- 
ism. IV. A Note on the Synthesis of Hippuric Acid in the Rabbit After 
Exclusion of Bile from the Intestine, J. Biol. Chem. 46, 73. 

Lewis, H. B. and Christman, A. A. Lipase Studies. I. The Hydrolysis of the 
Esters of Some Dicarboxylic Acids by the Lipase of the Liver, J. Biol. Chem. 
47, 495. 

Lewis, H. B. and Dunn, M. S. A Comparative Study of the Hydrolysis of 
Casein and Deaminized Casein by Proteolytic Enzymes, J. Biol. Chem. 
49, 343. 

Lewis, H. B. and Root, L. E. The Oxidation of Cystine in the Animal Organism, 
Proc. Am. Soc. Biol. Chem., J. Biol. Chem. 46, XXV. 

Lewis, H. B. and Dunn, M. S. The Action of Nitrous Acid on Casein, J. Biol. 
Chem. 49, 327. 

Lewis, H. B. and Hill, R. M. The Hydrolysis of Sucrose in the Stomach of 
Man, Proc. Am. Soc. Biol. Chem, J. Biol. Chem. 46, XXX. 

Lewis, H. B. and Stearns, G. Diet and Sex as Factors in the Creatinuria of 
Man, Am. J. Physiol., 56, 60. 

Noyes, W. A. An Attempt to Prepare Nitro-nitrogen Trichloride. II, J.A.C.S. 
43, 1774. 

Noyes, W. A. and Coleman, G. H. Chlorination and the Formation of Chlora- 
mines by Means of Nitrogen Trichloride, J.A.C.S. 43, 2211. 

Noyes, W. A. and Colver, C. W. Synthesis of . Anthracene from Naphthalene', 
J.A.C.S. 43, 898. 

Noyes, W. A., Lochte, H. L, and Bailey, J. R. Symmetrical Diiso-propyl- 
hydrazine and Its Derivatives, J.A.C.S. 43, 2598. 

Noyes, W. A. and Hufferd, R. W. The Application of Victor Meyer's Esterifi- 
cation Law to 2, 6-Xylic Acid and Its Reduced Derivatives, J.A.C.S. 43, 925. 

Parr, S. W. Low Temperature Carbonization and Its Application to High Oxy- 
gen Coals, J. Ind. Eng. Chem. 13, 1. 

Parr, S. W. and Austin, M. M. Potash Shales of Illinois, Univ. of 111. Agr. 
Expt. Sta, Bulletin 232, 229. 



Department of Chemistry 83 

Reedy, J. H. The Facts About Calcium Arsenate, Trans. 111. Hort. Soc. 55, 101. 

Reedy, J. H. Notes on Silver Bromate, J.A.C.S. 43, 1440. 

Reedy, J. H. Precipitation of Arsenic Sulfide from Arsenates, J.A.C.S. 43, 2419. 

Reedy, J. H. and Haag, I. L. Preparation and Instability of Calcium Arsenate, 
J. Ind. Eng. Chem. 13, 1038. 

1922 

Adams, R. Aliphatic Arsonic and Arsinic Acids and Aliphatic Aromatic Arsinic 
Acids, J.A.C.S. 44, 805. 

Adams, R., Conant, J. B. (Editor), Clarke, H. T., and Kamm, O. Organic 
Syntheses. II, 7 + 100 pp., John Wiley and Sons, New York. 

Adams, R., Fogler, M. F., and Kreger, C. W. The Structure of Disalicyl 
Aldehyde, J.A.C.S. 44, 1126. 

Adams, R. and Langley, W. D. Condensation of Certain Nitriles and Various 
Polyhydroxyphenols to Form Phenolic Acids, J.A.C.S. 44, 2320. 

Adams, R. and Marvel, C. S. Organic Chemical Reagents. IV. Univ. of 111., 
Bulletin 20, 8. 

Adams, R. and Palmer, C. S. The Reactions of the Arsines. II, J.A.C.S. 44, 
1356. 

Adams, R., Roman, F. L., and Sperry, W. N. The Structure of the Com- 
pounds Produced from Olefins and Mercury Salts: Mercurated Dihydro- 
benzofurans, J.A.C.S. 44, 1781. 

Adams, R. and Voorhees, V. The Use of the Oxides of Platinum for the 
Catalytic Reduction of Organic Compounds. I, J.A.C.S. 44, 1397. 

Beal, G. D. and Gunton, J. A. A Reinvestigation of the Proximate Composi- 
tion of Rhamnus Frangula, J. Am. Pharm. Assoc. 11, 669. 

Buswell, A. M. Boutron Boudet Soap Solution, J. Am. Water Works Assoc. 
9, 892. 

Buswell, A. M. Chemistry of Sanitation, J. Ind. Eng. Chem. 14, 6. 

Buswell, A. M., Brensky, A. A., and Neave, S. L. Chemical and Biological 
Reactions in the Dorr-Peck Tank, Am. J. Pub. Health, 12, 299. 

Buswell, A. M. and Greenfield, R. E. Investigation by Means of the Hydrogen 
Electrode of the Chemical Reactions Involved in Water Purification, J.A.C.S. 
44, 1435. 

Englis, D. T. and Tsang, C. Y. The Clarification of Solutions Containing Re- 
ducing Sugars by Basic Lead Acetate. The Effect of Different Deleading 
Agents, J.A.C.S. 44, 865. 

Hopkins, B S. and Driggs, F. H. Atomic Weight of Lanthanum, J.A.C.S. 44, 
1927; Chem. News 125, 211. 

Hopkins, B S. and Ruhle, G. C. Concentration of Radium from Carnotite Ores, 
Trans, 111. Sta. Acad. Sci. 15, 227. 

Kremers, H. C. Preparation of the Metals of the Rare Earth Group, Trans. 111. 
Sta. Acad. Sci. 15, 223. 

Lewis, H. B. Some Recent Advances in the Chemistry of Nutrition, Univ. of 111., 
H. S. Conf. Proc. 1922, 355. 

Lewis, H. B. and Hill, R. M. The Hydrolysis of Sucrose in the Human 
Stomach, Am. J. Physiol. 59, 413. 

Lewis, H. B. and Root, L. E. The Metabolism of Sulfur. IV. The Oxidation 
of Cystine in the .Animal Organism, J. Biol. Chem. 50, 303. 

Lewis, H. B., McGinty, D. A., and Root, L. E. The Metabolism of Sulfur. V. 
Cystine as an Intermediary Product in the Metabolism of Cystine, J. Biol. 
Chem. 53, 349. 

Marvel, C. S. and Gould, V. L. The Preparation of Dialkyl Mercury Com- 
pounds from the Grignard Reagent, J.A.C.S. 44, 153. 

Marvel, C. S. and Tanenbaum, A. L. The Preparation of 1, 4-Dihalogen De- 
rivatives of Butane, J.A.C.S. 44, 2645. 

Noyes, W. A. and Chiles, H. M. Optically Active Diazo Compounds. II, 
J.A.C.S. 44, 1798. 

Noyes, W. A. and Ginnings, P. M. Investigation of Bromonitrocamphane, 
J.A.C.S. 44, 2567. 



84 University of Illinois 



Noyes, W. A. and Goebel, W. F. Catalysis of the Formation and Hydrolysis of 

Acetamide by Acetic Acid, J.A.C.S. 44, 2286. 
Noyes, W. A., Lochte, H. L., and Bailey, J. R. Symmetrical Diiso-propyl- 

Hydrazine and Its Derivatives. II, J.A.C.S. 44, 2556. 
Noyes, W. A. and Wilson, T. A. The Ionization Constant of Hypochlorous 

Acid. Evidence for Amphoteric Ionization, J.A.C.S. 44, 1630. 
Parr, S. W. Calorific Value of American Woods, J. Ind. Eng. Chem. 14, 435. 
Parr, S. W. Classification of Coal, J. Ind. Eng. Chem. 14, 919. 
Parr, S. W. Illinois Coal as a Source of Smokeless Fuel, Power Plant Eng. 26, 

600; Gas Age Rec. 50, 531; Trans. 111. Sta. Acad. Sci. 15, 342. 
Parr, S. W. Short Method for the Ultimate Analysis of Coal, J. Ind. Eng. Chem. 

14, 681. 
Parr, S. W. Standardization of Laboratory Gas Cocks, J. Ind. Eng. Chem. 14, 

1105. 
Parr, S. W. and Bradley, M. J. A Study of Decomposition Processes Applicable 

to Certain Products of Coal Carbonization, Chem. Met. Eng. 27, 737. 
Reedy, J. H. Contamination by Aluminium in Analytical Work, J. Ind. Eng. 

Chem. 14, 243. 
Rodebush, W. H. The Atom of the Chemist, School Sci. and Math. 22, 737. 
Rodebush, W. H. The General Law for the Distribution of Energy in a System 

of Particles, Phys. Rev. 21, 198. 
Rodebush, W. H. A Simple Graphical Method of Calculating the Number of 

Plates Required for a Distilling Column, J. Ind. Eng. Chem. 14, 1036. 
Smith, G. F. and Willard, H. H. The Separation and Determination of Sodium 

and Lithium by Precipitation from Alcoholic Perchlorate Solution, J.A.C.S. 

44, 2816. 

1923 

Adams, R., Bullock, J. E., and Wilson, W. C. Contribution to the Structure 
of Benzidine, J.A.C.S. 45, 522. 

Adams, R. and Carothers, W. H. Platinum Oxide as a Catalyst in the Reduction 
of Organic Compounds. II. Reduction of Aldehydes. Activation of the 
Catalyst by the Salts of Certain Metals, J.A.C.S. 45, 1071. 

Adams, R. and Gardner, J. H. Trihydroxy-methyl-anthraquinones. II, J.A.C.S. 

45, 2455. 

Adams, R. and Graves, G. D. Trihydroxy-methyl-anthraquinones. I, J.A.C.S. 
45, 2439. 

Adams, R. and Johnson, J. R. Arsenated Derivatives of Phenyldiketopyrroli- 
dine, J.A.C.S. 45, 1307. 

Adams, R. and Kaufmann, R. J. Production of Imido Thiol Esters by the Con- 
densation of Thiocvanates with Resorcinol or Phloroglucinol, J.A.C.S. 45, 
1744. 

Adams, R. and Kaufmann, W. E. The Use of Platinum Oxide as a Catalyst in 
the Reduction of Organic Compounds. IV. Reduction of Furfural and Its 
Derivatives, J.A.C.S. 45, 3029. 

Adams, R. and Levine, I. Simplification of the Gattermann Synthesis of Hy- 
droxyaldehydes, J.A.C.S. 45, 2373. 

Adams, R. and McElvain, S. M. Synthesis of a New Bicyclic Nitrogen Ring. 
Isogranatanine Derivatives. Preparation of an Isomer of Homo-cocaine, 
J.A.C.S. 45, 2738. 

Adams, R. and Mills, L. E. Mercurated l-methyl-l,2-dihydro-benzo-furans, 
J.A.C.S. 45, 1842. 

Adams, R. and Pierce, J. S. Tetrahydro-1, 3, 2-oxazones and Substituted Gamma- 
amino Propanols, J.A.C.S. 45, 790. 

Adams, R. and Rodewald, C. W. Arsono-arylamino-alcohols, J.A.C.S. 45, 3102. 

Adams, R. and Segur, J. B. Beta-arylamino Ethanols, JA.C.S. 45, 785. 

Adams, R. and Shriner, R. L. Platinum Oxide as a Catalyst in the Reduction of 
Organic Compounds. III. Preparation and Properties of the Oxide of Plati- 
num Obtained by the Fusion of the Chloroplatinic Acid with Sodium Nitrate, 
J.A.C.S. 45, 2171. 



Department of Chemistry 85 

Adams, R., Sloan, A. W., and Taylor, B. S. Aryl 1,3-benzo-dioxanes (Aryl 

Methylene-saligenins), J.A.C.S. 45, 2417. 
Adams, R. and Tomecko, C. G. The Allyl Ethers of Various Carbohydrates, 

J.A.C.S. 45, 2698. 
Adams, R. and Wilson, W. C. Rings Through the Meta and Para Positions of 

Benzene. A Study of Certain Ethers of Resorcinol and Meta-amino-phenol, 

J.A.C.S. 45, 528. 
Beal, G. D. and Applegate, G. Preparation of Acid-fast Caramels. II. The 

Preparation of Sucrose Caramel, J. Am. Pharm. Assoc. 12, 850. 
Beal, G. D. and Bowey, D. F. Preparation of Acid-fast Caramels, J. Am. 

Pharm. Assoc. 12, 405. 
Beal, G. D. and Brown, J. B. The Highly Unsaturated Fatty Acids of Fish Oils, 

J.A.C.S. 45, 1289. 
Braley, S. A. and Schneider, R. F. Transference Numbers of Sodium and Po- 
tassium in Mixed Chloride Solution, J.A.C.S. 45, 1121. 
Buswell, A. M. Activated Sludge Studies 1920-1922, 111. State Water Survey, 

Bulletin 18, 150 pp. 
Buswell, A. M. Importance of Oxygen and Stirring for Activated Sludge 

Growth, Eng. News Record 90, 8, 119. 
Buswell, A. M. (Chairman of A.C.S. cooperating committee for revision of) 

"Standard Methods for the Examination of Water and Sewage," Am. Pub. 

Health Assoc, New York, 115 pp. 
Buswell, A. M. and Gallaher, W. U. Determination of Dissolved Oxygen in 

the Presence of Iron Salts, Ind. Eng. Chem. 15, 1187. 
Buswell, A. M. and Long, H. L. Microbiology and Theory of Activated Sludge, 

J. Am. Water Works Assoc. 10, 309. 
Carver, E. K. The Adsorption of Toluene Vapor on Plane Glass Surface, 

J.A.C.S. 45, 63. 
Carver, E. K. An Improved Optical Lever Manometer, J.A.C.S. 45, 59. 
Hurd, C. D. The Ketenic Decomposition of Ketones, Ketene and Methyl Ketene, 

J.A.C.S. 45, 3095. 
Hurd, C. D. Reactions of Alpha-phenyl-beta-hydroxyurea, and of Alpha-alpha- 

diphenyl-beta-hydroxyurea Interpreted from the Standpoint of their Hy- 

droxamic Acid Structures, J.A.C.S. 45, 1472. 
Hurd, C. D. A Simple Demonstration of the Effect of Temperature Upon a Gas, 

Ind. Eng. Chem. 15, 370. 
Hurd, C. D. A Supplement to Text Books in General Chemistry, 2 + 49 pp., 

Univ. of 111., Urbana, 111, 1923. 
Hurd, C. D. and Cochran, P. B. A Study of the Formation of Hydroxamic 

Acids from Ketene, J.A.C.S. 45, 515. 
Hurd, C. D. and Kocour, C. The Ketenic Decomposition of Methyl-ethyl 

Ketone, J.A.C.S. 45, 2168. 
Kremers, H. C. and Stevens, R. G. Rare Earths. XIV. Preparation and Proper- 
ties of Metallic Lanthanum, J.A.C.S. 45, 614. 
Marvel, C. S. and Calvery, H. 6. The Preparation of Dialkyl Mercury Com- 
pounds from the Grignard Reagent. II, J.A.C.S. 45, 820. 
Marvel, C. S, Clarke, H. T., Adams, R., Kamm, O, and Conant, J. B. Organic 

Syntheses. Ill, 104 pp., John Wiley and Sons, New York. 
Marvel, C. S. and Smith, F. E. Identification of Amines, J.A.C.S. 45, 2596. 
Nason, E. H. Fractional Distillation Apparatus, Ind. Eng. Chem. 15, 1188. 
Noyes, W. A. The Electronic Theory of Valency, Trans. Faraday Soc. 19, 476. 
Noyes, W. A. The Foundations for Chemical Development, J. Ind. Eng. Chem. 

14, 1. 
Noyes, W. A. Positive and Negative Valence, Bull. Soc. Chim. 9-10, 557. 
Noyes, W. A. A Possible Reconciliation of the Octet and Positive-negative 

Theories of Chemical Combination, J.A.C.S. 45, 2959. 
Noyes, W. A. Preparation of Absolute Alcohol with Calcium Chloride and Lime, 

J.A.C.S. 45, 857. 
Noyes, W. A. Transference Experiments with Electromeric Derivatives of Hy- 

droxylamine, J.A.C.S. 45, 355. 



University of Illinois 



Noyes, W. A. and Goebel, W. F. Camphoronic Acid, J.A.C.S. 45, 3064. 
Noyes, W. A. and Porter, P. K. Molecular Rearrangements in the Camphor 

Series. XIV. Structure of Isocampholactone, J.A.C.S. 45, 2366. 
Parr, S. W. and Bosman, V. A Study of South African Coals, S. African J. 

Ind. 6, 215. 
Porter, P. K. Action of the Grignard Reagent on Keto Acids, J.A.C.S. 45, 1086. 
Reedy, J. H. Editor of Noyes' Qualitative Analysis, 2+128 pp., Rev. ed., Henry 

Holt and Co., New York. 
Reedy, J. H. How to Get a Closer Relation Between the Chemistry of High 

School and the College, School Sci. and Math. 23, 246. 
Rodebush, W. H. The Atomic Heats of Cadmium and Tin at Low Temperature, 

J.A.C.S. 45, 1413. 
Rodebush, W. H. The Problem of Gas Degeneration, Phys. Rev. 23, 115. 
Rodebush, W. H. The Rate of Evaporation of Electrons from Hot Filaments, 

J.A.C.S. 45, 997. 
Rodebush, W. H. The Relation Between Thermoelectric Force and the Rate of 

Evaporation of Electrons from Hot Filaments, Science 47, 534. 
Rodebush, W. H. A Statistical Theory of Monomolecular Reactions, J.A.C.S. 

45, 606. 
Rodebush, W. H. and Fogler, M. F. The Heats of Vaporization of Mercury and 

Cadmium, J.A.C.S. 45, 2080. 
Rodebush, W. H. and Yntema, T. O. A Low Temperature Electrolyte, J.A.C.S. 

45, 332. 
Rose, W. C. Purine Metabolism, Physiol. Rev. 3, 544. 
Rose, W. C. and Dim mitt, P. S. The Nephropathic Action of Mucic Acid, Proc. 

Am. Soc. Biol. Chem., J. Biol. Chem. 55, XXVII. 
Smith, G. F. The Separation and Determination of Potassium and Sodium. A 

Perchlorate Precipitation Process Using Normal Butyl Alcohol, J.A.C.S. 

45, 2072. 
Smith, G. F. The Use of Bromate in Volumetric Analysis. I. The Stability of 

Bromic Acid in Boiling Solutions, J.A.C.S. 45, 1115. 
Smith, G. F. The Use of Bromate in Volumetric Analysis. II. The Influence of 

Mercuric Mercury Upon Bromic Acid Reactions, J.A.C.S. 45, 1417. 
Smith, G. F. The Use of Bromate in Volumetric Analysis. III. The Determina- 
tion of Bromate in the Presence of Ferric Iron, J.A.C.S. 45, 1666. 

1924 

Adams, R. and Brode, W. R. Optically Active Dyes. II. Adsorption, Absorption 
Spectra, and Rotation, J.A.C.S. 46, 2032. 

Adams, R. and Bauer, W. W. Diarsono-diphenyl and Derivatives, J.A.C.S. 46, 
1925. 

Adams, R. and Carothers, W. H. Platinum Oxide as a Catalyst in the Reduc- 
tion of Organic Compounds. V. The Preparation of Primary Alcohols by 
the Catalytic Hydrogenation of Aldehydes, J.A.C.S. 46, 1675. 

Adams, R. and Jacobson, R. A. Polyhydroxy-methylanthraquinones. IV. Con- 
densation of Opianic Acid with Substituted Phenols. Orientation in the 
Preparation of Anthraquinones, J.A.C.S. 46, 2788. 

Adams, R. and Jacobson, R. A. Trihydroxy-methylanthraquinones. III. Syn- 
thesis of Emodin, J.A.C.S. 46, 1312. 

Adams, R. and Koten, I. A. Certain Reactions of the Alkyl and Aryl Mercuric 
Hydroxides, J.A.C.S. 46, 2764. 

Adams, R. and Montgomery, E. Simplification of the Gattermann Synthesis of 
Aromatic Aldehydes. II. J.A.C.S. 46, 1518. 

Adams, R. and Noller, C. R. The Use of Aliphatic Acid Anhydrides in the 
Preparation of Ketones by the Friedel and Crafts Reaction, J.A.C.S. 46, 1889. 

Adams, R. and Rassweiler, C. F. The Structure of Dehydro-acetic Acid, 
J.A.C.S. 46, 2758. 

Adams, R. and Shriner, R. L. The Preparation of Palladous Oxide and Its Use 
as a Catalyst in the Reduction of Organic Compounds. VI, J.A.C.S. 46, 
1683. 



Department of Chemistry 87 

Austin, M. M. Granular Carbon Resistor Furnaces, Ind. Eng. Chem. 16, 156. 

Austin, M. M. A Mechanical Model for Metals, Chem. Bulletin 11, 12. 

Beal, G. D. Can the Anthraquinone Drugs Be Scientifically Valued? J. Am. 

Pharm. Assoc. 13, 215. 
Beal, G. D. and North, E. O. The Preparation, Properties, and Uses of Sili- 

coduodecitungstic Acid. I. The Preparation of the Acid and Its Salts, J. 

Am. Pharm. Assoc. 13, 889. 
Beal, G. D. and North, E. O. The Preparation, Properties, and Uses of Silico- 

duodecitungstic Acid. II. The Use of the Acid as a Volumetric Reagent for 

Alkaloids, J. Am. Pharm. Assoc. 13, 1001. 
Beal, G. D. and Sparks, K. E. Preparation of Arsenic-free Reagents, Ind. Eng. 

Chem. 16, 369. 
Brode, W. R. The Determination of Hydrogen-ion Concentration by a Spectro- 
photometry Method and the Absorption Spectra of Certain Indicators, 

J.A.C.S. 46, 581. 
Buswell, A. M. Importance of Oxygen and Stirring for Activated Sludge 

Growth, Eng. News-Record 90, 835. 
Buswell, A. M. and Gallaher, W. U. Determination of Dissolved Oxygen in 

the Presence of Iron Salts, Ind. Eng. Chem. 15, 1186. 
Buswell, A. M., Greenfield, R. E., and Weinhold, G. A. A Preliminary 

Notice of a Survey of the Sources of Pollution of the Streams of Illinois, 

Univ. of 111. State Water Survey, Bulletin 20, 34. 
Carothers, W. H. The Double Bond, J.A.C.S. 46, 1675. 

Derick, C. G. and Howard, J. W. The Mechanism of the Hoffmann Rearrange- 
ment of Methyl Aniline Hydrochloride, J.A.C.S. 46, 166. 
Greenfield, R. E. Comparison of Chemical and Bacteriological Examinations 

Made on the Illinois River During a Season of Low and a Season of High 

Water, 1923-24, Univ. of 111. State Water Survey, Bulletin 20, 9. 
Greenfield, R. E. Co-operative Work of the State Water Survey and the State 

Natural History Survey of the Illinois River, Chem. Bulletin 11, 3. 
Greenfield, R. E. A Note on the Transition Temperature of Aragonite and 

Calcite, Trans. 111. Sta. Acad. Sci. 17, 125. 
Hopkins, B S. Further Developments in the Standardization of the Chemical 

Curriculum, Proc. H. S. Conf., Univ. of 111. Bulletin 22, 245. 
Hopkins, B S. A National Standard Minimum Course in Chemistry, Proc. H. S. 

Conf., Univ. of 111. Bulletin 21, 25. 
Hopkins, B S. Need of Trained Teachers in Chemistry, J. Chem. Educ. 1, 35. 
Hopkins, B S. A New Covering for Laboratory Table Tops, J. Chem. Educ. 

1, 209. 
Hopkins, B S. Training of the High-school Chemistry Teacher — Prospective 

and in Service, School Sci. and Math. 25, 233. 
Hopkins, B S. and Engle, E. A. Extraction of Beryllium from Beryl. Eng. Min. 

J. Press 118, 49. 
Hopkins, B S. and Engle, E. A. Metallurgy and Alloys of Beryllium, Trans. 

Am. Electrochem. Soc. 45, 483. 
Hopkins, B S. and Meyer, A. W. Electrolytic Production of Beryllium, Trans. 

Am. Electrochem. Soc. 45, 475. 
Marvel, C. S. and Hager, F. D. Bauer Oil, the High Boiling Residue from 

Molasses Fusel Oil. A Source of Capric Acid, J.A.C.S. 46, 726. 
Marvel, C. S., Kendall, F. E., Lazier, W. A., and MacCorquodale, D. W. 

The Synthesis of Some Possible Precursors of Lysine, J.A.C.S. 46, 2838. 
Marvel, C. S., Lewis, H. B., and McGinty, D. A. The Availability of Some 

Caproic Acid Derivatives for the Synthesis of Lysine, J. Biol. Chem. 62, 75. 
Marvel, C. S. and DuVigneaud, V. A New Organic Reagent for the Detection 

of Nitrates and Perchlorates, J.A.C.S. 46, 2661. 
Marvel, C. S. and DuVigneaud, V. Pressor Anesthetics, J.A.C.S. 46, 2093. 
Neville, H. A. Chemical Quackery, Proc. H. S. Conf., Univ. of 111., Bulletin 

22, 248. 



88 University of Illinois 



Noyes, W. A. Ueber die Polaritat der Valenzen, Ber. 57, 1133. 

Noyes, W. A. Valences Positives et Negatives, Bull. Soc. Chim. (4), 35, 425. 

Parr, S. W. Fuel Losses Sustained from Boiler Scale, Honeycombing of Flues 
and Sheets and from Excessive Clinkering of Grates, 2nd pub. Internat. 
Rwy. Fuel Assoc. 6, 13. 

Parr, S. W. Industrial Coal: Purchase, Delivery, and Storage, 11 pp., Chap. Ill, 
Part II, A Report of Am. Eng. Council, Ronald Press, New York. 

Parr, S. W. Introduction to Monograph on Coal Carbonization by Horace C. 
Porter, A.C.S. Monograph, p. 13. 

Parr, S. W. and Moose, J. E. A Redetermination of the Heats of Oxidation of 
Certain Metals, J.A.C.S. 46, 2656. 

Parr, S. W. and Vandaveer, F. E. Analysis of Fuel Gas, Univ. of 111., Bulletin 
22, 8. 

Parr, S. W. and Yancey, H. F. Sulfur Forms in Coal, Ind. Eng. Chem. 16, 601. 

Reedy, J. H. Elementary Qualitative Analysis, 2+134 pp., McGraw-Hill Book 
Co., New York. 

Rodebush, W. H. Chapter, the Third Law of Thermodynamics and the Calcula- 
tion of Chemical Constants, in Treatise on Physical Chemistry, 72 pp., D. 
Van Nostrand Co., New York. 

Rodebush, W. H. The Ionization of Strong Electrolytes, J. Phys. Chem. 28, 1113. 

Rodebush, W. H. The Subject Matter of a Course in Physical Chemistry, Sci- 
ence 59, 430. 

Rose, W. C. The Nephropathic Action of the Dicarboxylic Acids and Their 
Derivatives. I. Tartaric, Malic, and Succinic Acids, J. Pharmacol. 24, 123. 

Rose, W. C. The Nephropathic Action of the Dicarboxylic Acids and Their 
Derivatives. II. Glutaric and Malonic Acids, J. Pharmacol. 24, 147. 

Rose, W. C. and Cox, G. J. The Relation of Arginine and Histidine to Growth, 
J. Biol. Chem. 61, 747. 

Smith, G. F., Brown, M., and Ross, J. F. Magnesium Perchlorate Trihydrate. 
Its Use as Drying Agent for Steel and Organic Combustion Analysis, Ind. 
Eng. Chem. 16, 20. 

Smith, G. F. and Hollister, C. E. A New Design Circuit Breaker for Labora- 
tory Thermostats, Ind. Eng. Chem. 16, 2. 

Taylor, J. B. A New Stability Test for Nitrocellulose, Ind. Eng. Chem. 16, 1185. 

1925 

Adams, R. and Butler, C. L., Jr. Search in the Diphenylmethane Series for the 
Isomerism Characteristic of Certain Diphenyl Derivatives, J.A.C.S. 47, 2610. 

Adams, R., Calvery, H. O., and Noller, C. R. Arsonophenyl-cinchoninic Acid 
(Arsonocinchophen) and Derivatives. II, J.A.C.S. 47, 3058. 

Adams, R. and Carothers, W. H. Platinum Oxide as a Catalyst in the Reduc- 
tion of Organic Compounds. VII. A study of the Effects of Numerous 
Substances on the Platinum Catalysis of the Reduction of Benzaldehyde, 
J.A.C.S. 47, 1047. 

Adams, R. and Heckel, H. Platinum Oxide as a Catalyst in the Reduction of 
Organic Compounds. X. Reduction of Amino-phenols to Cyclic Amino- 
alcohols, J.A.C.S. 47, 1712. 

Adams, R. and Jacobson, R. A. Polyhydroxy and Polyhydroxymethylanthra- 
quinones. VI. Syntheses from Opianic Acid and Phenols or Cresols, 
J.A.C.S. 47, 2011. 

Adams, R. and Jacobson, R. A. Trihydroxy-methylanthraquinones. V. Syn- 
thesis of Morindone, J.A.C.S. 47, 283. 

Adams, R., Kamm, O. (Editor-in-Chief), Clarke, H. T., Conant, J. B., Marvel, 
C. S., and Whitmore, F. C. Organic Syntheses. IV, 5+89 pp., John Wiley 
and Sons, New York. 

Adams, R., Kern, J. W., and Shriner, R. L. Platinum and Palladium Oxides 
as Catalysts in the Reduction of Organic Compounds. IX. The Reduction 
of Olefines, J.A.C.S. 47, 1147. 



Department of Chemistry 89 

Adams, R. and Ogden, K. Arsonophenyl-cinchoninic Acid and Derivatives, 

J.A.C.S. 47, 826. 
Adams, R. and Pierce, J. S. Platinum Oxide as a Catalyst in the Reduction of 

Organic Compounds. VIII. The Reduction of Alkyl Furyl Carbinols, 

J.A.C.S. 47, 1098. 
Adams, R. and Shriner, R. L. Structure of Chaulmoogric and Hydnocarpic 

Acids. I, J.A.C.S. 47, 2727. 
Adams, R. and Tuley, W. F. Reduction of Cinnamic Aldehyde to Cinnamyl 

Alcohol in the Presence of Platinum Oxide Platinum Black, and Promoters. 

XI, J.A.C.S. 47, 3061. 
Beal, G. D. and Katti, M. C. T. The Oil of Pongamia Glabra, J. Am. Pharm. 

Assoc. 14, 1086. 
Beal, G. D. and Katti, M. C. T. Some Observations on the Quantitative De- 
termination of the Anthraquinone Derivatives in Cathartic Drugs, J. Am. 

Pharm. Assoc. 14, 865. 
Bradley, M. J. Chemical Engineering Equipment for University Laboratories, 

Ind. Eng. Chem. 17, 496. 
Bradley, M. J. The Composition and Function of Slag. Fuels and Furnaces, 

32, 721. 
Buswell, A. M., Weinhold, G. A., and Greenfield, R. E. Chemistry of Sewage 

Treatment, Trans. 111. Sta. Acad. Sci. 17, 47. 
Buswell, A. M., Weinhold, G. A., and Greenfield, R. E. Municipal Water 

Softening in Illinois, 111. Municipal Rev. 3, 156. 
Buswell, A. M., Weinhold, G. A., and Greenfield, R. E. A Preliminary Notice 

of a Survey of the Sources of Pollution of the Streams of Illinois, 111. 

State Water Survey, Bulletin 20, 34. 
Carothers, W. H. and Jones, G. A. The Preparation of Some Primary Amines 

by the Catalytic Reduction of Nitriles, J.A.C.S. 47, 3051. 
Englis, D. T., Decker, R. T., and Adams, A. B. The Preparation of Raffinose 

from Cottonseed Meal, J.A.C.S. 47, 2724. 
Englis, D. T. and Hale, C. The Occurrence of Free Pentose in Plants. The 

Effect of the Extraction of the Sugars with Ammoniacal Alcohol, J.A.C.S. 

47, 446. 
Englis, D. T. and Lunt, H. A. Effect of Potassium Upon the Diastatic Activity 

of Plants, Soil Science 20, 459. 
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Media Upon the Carbohydrate Metabolism of Plants — the Diastatic Activity 

of the Nasturtium, Soil Science 20, 459. 
Greenfield, R. E. A Demonstration on the Pollution of the Illinois River, Trans. 

111. Sta. Acad. Sci. 18, 451. 
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18, 253. 
Hopkins, B S., Crew, M. A., and Steinert, H. E. The Solubility of Yttrium 

Salts, J. Phys. Chem. 29, 34. 
Hopkins, B S. and Driggs, F. H. Purification and Atomic Weight of Holmium, 

J.A.C.S. 47, 363. 
Hopkins, B S. and Engle, D. Studies in Luminescence, J. Optical Soc. Am. 

2, 599. 
Hopkins, B S., Lapp, C. J., and Rogers, R. A. A Search for Element No. 61, 

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Hopkins, B S. and Lougee, F. M. Selenium Compounds as Spray Materials, 

Ind. Eng. Chem. 17, 456. 
Hopkins, B S. and Munn, L. E. The Value of Some Tellurium Compounds as 

Disinfectants, J. Bact. 10, 79. 
Kremers, H. C. Chlorine for Colds, School Sci. and Math. 25, 287. 
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Kremers, H. C. A Laboratory Circulating Pump for Corrosive Vapors, Ind. 

Eng. Chem. 17, 298. 
Kremers, H. C. Metallic Neodymium, Trans. Am. Electrochem. Soc. 47, 365. 



90 University of Illinois 



Kremers, H. C. Preparation and Some Properties of Metallic Neodymium, J. 
Am. Electrochem. Soc. 47, 365. 

Kremers, H. C. and Beuker, H. Preparation and Properties of Metallic Cerium, 
J. Am. Electrochem. Soc. 47, 353. 

Kremers, H. C. and Thompson, A. P. Cerium Free Misch Metal, Trans. Am. 
Electrochem. Soc. 47, 345. 

Kremers, H. C. and Wierda, J. Metallic Praseodymium, (Preprint 7), Trans. 
Am. Electrochem. Soc. 48, 65. 

Marvel, C. S., Adams, R., Clark, H. T., Conant, J. B., Gilman, H., Kamm, 
O., and Whitmore, F. C. Organic Syntheses. V, 1 + 110 pp., John Wiley 
and Sons, New York. 

Marvel, C. S. and Broderick, A. E. The Composition of Yellow Oil Obtained 
in the Manufacture of n-Butyl Alcohol by Fermentation, J.A.C.S. 47, 3045. 

Marvel, C. S. and Gray, A. E. The Stability of Hexa-substituted Ethanes, 
J.A.C.S. 47, 2796. 

Marvel, C. S., Gauerke, C. G., and Hill, E. L. The Identification of Pri- 
mary Alkyl Bromides and Iodides, J.A.C.S. 47, 3009. 

Marvel, C. S., Kingsbury, F. L., and Smith, F. E. Identification of Amines. 
II. Meta-nitrobenzene-sulphonamides, J.A.C.S. 47, 166. 

Neville, H. A. The Metric System for General Use, Trans. 111. Sta. Acad. Sci. 
18, 245. 

Noyes, W. A. An Attempt to Prepare Nitro-nitrogen Trichloride. III. Failure 
to Obtain a Compound Containing Only Nitrogen and Chlorine from Oxides 
of Nitrogen, J.A.C.S. 47, 2159. 

Noyes, W. A. Ionization of Trimethylethoxyammonium Hydroxide, Trimethyl- 
amine Oxide and Their Derivatives, J.A.C.S. 47, 3025. 

Noyes, W. A. Preparation of Nitric Oxide from Sodium Nitrite, J.A.C.S. 47, 
2170. 

Noyes, W. A. A Simple Differential Air Thermometer for Use at Low Temper- 
atures, J.A.C.S. 47, 1942. 

Noyes, W. A. and Tuley, W. F. Heat of Formation of Nitrogen Trichloride, 
J.A.C.S. 47, 1336. 

Parr, S. W. Conditions Governing the Efficiency of Gas Burners, Ind. Eng. 
Chem. 17, 1215. 

Parr, S. W. Deterioration and Spontaneous Combustion of Coal in Storage, Ind. 
Eng. Chem. 17, 120. 

Parr, S. W. Fuel Losses Resulting from Boiler Scale, Combustion 12, 57. 

Parr, S. W. and Coons, C. C. Carbon Dioxide as an Index of the Critical Oxi- 
dation Temperature for Coal in Storage, Ind. Eng. Chem. 17, 118. 

Parr, S. W. and Hilgard, E. R., Oxidation of Sulfur as a Factor in Coal 
Storage, Ind. Eng. Chem. 17, 117. 

Parr, S. W. and Hobart, F. B. Coal and Oxygen, Min. and Met. 6, 36. 

Parr, S. W. and Milner, R. T. The Oxidation of Coal at Storage Temperature, 
Ind. Eng. Chem. 17, 115. 

Parr, S. W. and Vandaveer, F. E. The Use of Oxygen in the Manufacture of 
Water Gas, Ind. Eng. Chem. 17, 1123. 

Rodebush, W. H. A Compact Arrangement of the Periodic Table, J. Chem. 
Educ. 2, 381. 

Rodebush, W. H., Andrews, J. W., and Taylor, J. B. The Temperature- 
entropy Diagrams for Oxygen and Nitrogen, J.A.C.S. 47, 313. 

Rodebush, W. H., Andrews, J. W., and Taylor, J. B. The Temperature- 
entropy Diagrams for Nitrogen and Oxygen, J.A.C.S. 47, 315. 

Rodebush, W. H. and Dixon, A. L. The Entropies of the Vapors of Zinc and 
Lead, J.A.C.S. 47, 1036. 

Rodebush, W. H. and Dixon, A. L. The Vapor Pressures of Metals; a New 
Experimental Method, Phys. Rev. 26, 851. 

Rodebush, W. H. and De Vries, T. The Vapor Pressure of Sodium, J.A.C.S. 
47, 2488. 



Department of Chemistry 91 

Rodebush, W. H. and Fiock, E. F. The Measurement of the Absolute Charge 
on the Earth's Surface, Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. 11, 402. 

Rodebush, W. H. and Hovorka, F. The Freezing Points of Very Dilute Solu- 
tions of Electrolytes, J.A.C.S. 47, 1614. 

Rodebush, W. H. and Michalek, J. C. The Atomic Heat Capacities of Iron 
and Nickel at Low Temperatures, J.A.C.S. 47, 2\\7. 

Rose, W. C. and Cook, K. G. The Relation of Histidine and Arginine to Crea- 
tine and Purine Metabolism, J. Biol. Chem. 64, 325. 

Rose, W. C. and Cox, G. J. Can Other Imidazoles Replace Histidine in the Diet 
for Purposes of Growth? Proc. Amer. Soc. Biol. Chem., J. Biol. Chem. 67, iii. 

Rose, W. C. and Dim mitt, P. S. The Nephropathic Action of the Dicarboxylic 
Acids and Their Derivatives. IV. Mucic Acid, J. Pharmacol. 25, 65. 

Rose, W. C, Weber, C. J., Corley, R. C, and Jackson, R. W. The Nephro- 
pathic Action of the Dicarboxylic Acids and Their Derivatives. III. Acids of 
Six to Nine Carbons, J. Pharmacol. 25, 59. 

Smith, G. F. The Separation and Determination of the Alkali Metals. I. The 
Solubilities of the Perchlorates of the Alkali Metals in Mixed Organic Sol- 
vents, J.A.C.S. 47, 8 ; 111. State Acad. Sci. 18, 268. 

Smith, G. F. and Ross, J. F. The Separation and Determination of the Alkali 
Metals. II. The Precise Estimation of the Insoluble Alkali Metal Perchlor- 
ates, J.A.C.S. 47, 8; 111. State Acad. Sci. 18, 277. 

Smith, G. F. and Ross, J. F. The Separation and Determination of the Alkali 
Metals. III. Normal Butyl Alcohol and Ethyl Acetate as Mixed Solvents 
in the Separation and Determination of Potassium, Sodium and Lithium, 
J.A.C.S. 47, 7; 111. State Acad. Sci. 18, 286. 

1926 

Adams, R. Synthetic Versus Natural Products, Ind. Eng. Chem. 18, 1182. 
Adams, R. and Brode, W. R. Optically Active Dyes. III. Physical Properties, 

Dyeing Reactions and Mechanism of Dyeing, J.A.C.S. 48, 2193. 
Adams, R. and Brode, W. R. Optically Active Dyes. IV. Asymmetric Dyes 

from Meta-amino Mandelic Acid, J.A.C.S. 48, 2202. 
Adams, R. and Garvey, B.S. Selective Reduction of Citral bv Means of Platinum 

Oxide, Platinum Black, and a Promoter. XII, J.A.C.S. 48, 477. 
Adams, R. and Hiers, G. S. Omega-cyclohexyl Derivatives of Various Normal 

Aliphatic Acids. IV, J.A.C.S. 48, 2385. 
Adams, R. and Hiers, G. S. Synthesis of Homologs of Dihydrochaulmoogric 

and Dihydrohydnocarpic Acids Containing a Cyclohexyl Group in Place of a 

Cyclopentyl Group. Ill, J.A.C.S. 48, 1089. 
Adams, R. and Hiers, G. S. Uber die Reduktion der o-Phenylen-essig-propion- 

saure und Verschiedener Aromatischer Amine mit Wasserstoff unter Ver- 

wendung von Platinoxyd-platinschwarz als Katalysator, Ber. 59, 162. 
Adams, R. and Noller, C. R. The Preparation and Use of Aldehyde Esters 

Formed by Ozonation of the Methyl Esters of Various Unsaturated Acids, 

J.A.C.S. 48, 1074. 
Adams, R. and Noller, C. R. Synthesis of Dihydrochaulmoogric and Dihydro- 
hydnocarpic Acids. II, J.A.C.S. 48, 1080. 
Adams, R. and Noller, C. R. Synthesis of a Homolog of Chaulmoogric Acid. 

A 2 - C yclopentenylacetic Acid. VII, J.A.C.S. 48, 2444. 
Adams, R., Rideal, E. K., Burnett, W. B., Jenkins, R. L., and Dreger, E. E. 

Chemical Constitution, Physiological Action and Physical Properties in a 

Series of Alkyl p-aminobenzoates, J.A.C.S. 48, 1758. 
Adams, R. and Sacks, J. The Synthesis of Homochaulmoogric Acid, Homohyd- 

nocarpic Acid and Chaulmoogrylamine. VI, J.A.C.S. 48, 2395. 
Adams, R. and Supniewski, J. V. Organic Bismuth Compounds. I. Preparation 

of Tricarboxy Triphenyl Bismuth Dichlorides and Certain Nitrotriaryl Bis- 
muth Compounds, J.A.C.S. 48, 507. 
Adams, R. and Van Dyke, R. H. Synthesis of Chaulmoogrylacetic Acid, 

J.A.C.S. 48, 2393. 



92 University of Illinois 



Adams, R. and Vliet, E. B. Relationship Between Hydrogen-ion Concentration 

and Chemical Constitution in Certain Local Anesthetics, J.A.C.S. 48, 2158. 
Bradley, M. J., Corbin, R. M., and Floyd, T. W. The Oxygen Bomb Method 

for Sulfur Determination, Ind. Eng. Chem. 18, 583. 
Bradley, M. J., Rosecrans, C. Z., and Corbin, R. M. Theoretical and Re- 
corded Pressures in Oxygen Bomb Determinations, Ind. Eng. Chem. 18, 307. 
Buswell, A. M. Chicago and the Mississippi Waterway Problem. The American 

Review of Reviews 74, 610. 
Buswell, A. M. and Boruff, C. S. The Sensitivity of the Ortho-toluidine and 

Starch-iodide Tests for Free Chlorine, J. Am. Water Works Assoc. 14, 384. 
Buswell, A. M. and Edwards, G. P. Investigations of Chemical Reactions 

Involved in Water Purification. Part II, State Water Survey, Bulletin 22. 
Buswell, A. M. and Gallaher, W. U. Investigations of Chemical Reactions 

Involved in Water Purification. Part III, State Water Survey, Bulletin 22. 
Buswell, A. M. and Greenfield, R. E. Investigations of Chemical Reactions 

Involved in Water Purification. Part I, State Water Survey, Bulletin 22. 
Buswell, A. M., Greenfield, R. E., and Shive, R. A. Chemical Characteristics 

of Some Trade Wastes, Ind. Eng. Chem. 18, 1082. 
Buswell, A. M. and McRoberts, L. H. Investigations of Chemical Reactions 

Involved in Water Purification. Part IV, State Water Survey, Bulletin 22. 
Buswell, A. M. and Neave, S. L. Note on the Occurrence of Bacteria in Oil- 
well Brine Samples, J. Bact. 12, 133. 
Buswell, A. M. and Strickhouser, S. I. Some Observations on Sewage Tank 

Gases, Ind. Eng. Chem. 18, 407. 
Carothers, W. H. The Reactivities of Some Tertiary Bromides, J.A.C.S. 48, 

3192. 
Greenfield, R. E. and Elder, A. L. Effect of Temperature on Rate of Deoxy- 

genation of Diluted Sewage, Ind. Eng. Chem. 18, 291. 
Greenfield, R. E. and Elder, A. L. A Simple Apparatus for Demonstration of 

Cataphoresis, J. Chem. Educ. 3, 443. 
Hopkins, B S. and Harris, J. A. Element No. 61. Part I. Concentration and 

Isolation in Impure State, J.A.C.S. 48, 1585. 
Hopkins, B S., Yntema, L. F., and Harris, J. A. Element No. 61. Part II. 

X-ray Analysis, J.A.C.S. 48, 1594. 
Hopkins, B S., Yntema, L. F., and Harris, J. A. The Element of Atomic 

Number 61, Illinium, Nature 117, 792. 
Hopkins, B S., Yntema, L. F., and Harris, J. A. Illinium, Science 63, 575 ; 

Sciences et Voyages 7 , 15. 
Johnson, J. R. and McEwen, W. L. The Identification of Monosubstituted 

Acetylenes, Derivatives of Diethinyl Mercury, J.A.C.S. 48, 469. 
Johnson, J. R. Catalysis and Auto-oxygenic and Pro-oxygenic Activity, by 

Moureu and Dufraisse (Translation), Chem. Reviews 3, 113. 
Karns, G. M. A Modified Type of Gas Volumeter for the Determination of 

the Densities of Solids, J.A.C.S. 48, 1176. 
Karns, G. M. A Test for Cadmium in the Presence of Copper, J.A.C.S. 48, 

2626. 
Krase, N. W. Separating Nitrogen Oxides from Ammonia Oxidation Gas, 

Chem. Met. Eng. 33, 674. 
Kremers, H. C, Thompson, A. P., and Holton, W. B. Metallic Yttrium, 

(Reprint 14) Trans. Am. Electrochem. Soc. 49, 161. 
Marvel, C. S. and Gillespie, H. B. Identification of Amines. III. Benzylsul- 

fonamides, J.A.C.S. 48, 2943. 
Marvel, C. S. and Hager, F. D. The Value of Nitrogen in Quaternary Am- 
monium Compounds, J.A.C.S. 48, 2689. 
Marvel, C. S. and Sandborn, L. T. The Structure of the Compounds Produced 

by the Addition of Mercuric Salts to Olefines, J.A.C.S. 48, 1909. 
Neville, H. A. Adsorption and Reaction. I. The Setting of Plaster of Paris, 

J. Phys. Chem. 30, 1037. 
Neville, H. A. Adsorption and Reaction. II. The Setting of Litharge-Glycerine 

Cement, J. Phys. Chem. 30, 1181. 



Department of Chemistry 93 

Noyes, W. A. Organic Chemistry, xix + 677 pp., Henry Holt and Co., New York. 

Noyes, W. A. Organic Chemistry for the Laboratory, 5th Ed. Rev., xiii + 329 
pp., The Chemical Publishing Company, Easton, Pa. 

Noyes, W. A. Relation Between the Cost of Research and the Cost of Publi- 
cation, Ind. Eng. Chem. 18, 985. 

Noyes, W. A. and Kendall, F. E. Optically Active Diazo Compounds. III. 
A Crystalline, Alicyclic Diazo Ester, J.A.C.S. 48, 2404. 

Parr, S. W. The Constitution of Coal, Ind. Eng. Chem. 18, 640. 

Parr, S. W. Future Trends in Low-Temperature Carbonization, Ind. Eng. Chem. 
18, 1194. 

Parr, S. W. A Pioneer Investigator, Ind. Eng. Chem. 18, 94. 

Parr, S. W. Recording Gas Calorimeter of the Flow Type, Ind. Eng. Chem. 18, 
1194. 

Parr, S. W. Relation of Origin and State of Carbonization of Coal to Problems 
of Low-Temperature Carbonization, Trans. Am. Inst, of Mining and Met. 
Eng. 7, 73. 

Parr, S. W. and King, W. R., Jr. The Density of Carbon Dioxide with a Table 
of Recalculated Values, Univ. of 111. Eng. Expt. Sta., Circular 23, 49. 

Parr, S. W. and Li, S. H. The Oxidation of Pyrites as a Factor in the Spon- 
taneous Combusion of Coal, Ind. Eng. Chem. 18, 1299. 

Parr, S. W. and Straub, F. G. The Cause and Prevention of Embrittlement of 
Boiler Plate, Univ. of 111. Eng. Expt. Sta., Bulletin 155. 

Phipps, T. E. and Brode, W. R. A Comparative Study of Two Kinds of Colored 
Rock Salt, J. Phys. Chem. 30, 507. 

Phipps, T. E. and Gibson, G. E. The Conductance of Solutions of Alkali Metals 
in Liquid Ammonia and in Methylamine, J.A.C.S. 48, 312. 

Phipps, T. E., Lansing, W. D., and Cooke, T. G. Temperature-conductance 
Curves of Solid Salts. I. The Halides of Sodium, J.A.C.S. 48, 112. 

Phipps, T. E. and Taylor, J. B. The Magnetic Moment of Atomic Hydrogen, 
Science 44, 480. 

Reedy, J. H. The Present Status of the Corrosion Problem, School Sci. and 
Math. 26, 412. 

Rodebush, W. H. The Activity of Several Types of Electrolytes Calculated 
from Freezing Point Data, J.A.C.S. 48, 709. 

Rodebush, W. H. and Fiock, E. F. The Vapor Pressures and Thermal Prop- 
erties of Potassium and Some Alkali Halides, J.A.C.S. 48, 2522. 

Rodebush, W. H., Kunz, J., and Taylor, J. B. Magnetic Properties of Atoms, 
Science 63, 550. 

Rose, W. C. and Cox, G. J. The Availability of Synthetic Imidazoles in Supple- 
menting Diets Deficient in Histidine, J. Biol. Chem. 68, 781. 

Rose, W. C. and Cox, G. J. Can Other Imidazoles Replace Histidine in the Diet 
for Purposes of Growth? J. Biol. Chem. 67, 3. 

Rose, W. C. and Cox, G. J. Can Purines, Creatinine or Creatine Replace Histi- 
dine in the Diet for Purposes of Growth? J. Biol. Chem. 68, 769. 

Rose, W. C. and Cox, G. J. Further Experiments on the Alleged Interchange- 
ability of Arginine and Histidine in Metabolism, J. Biol. Chem. 68, 217 '. 

Rose, W. C. and Corley, R. C. The Nephropathic Action of the Dicarboxylic 
Acids and Their . Derivatives. V. Alkyl-Hydroxy-, and Keto-substituted 
Acids, J. Pharmacol. 27, 165. 

Rose, W. C. and Huddlestun, B. T. The Availability of Taurine as a Supple- 
menting Agent in Diets Deficient in Cystine, J. Biol. Chem. 69, 599. 

Rose, W. C. and Jackson, R. W. The Effect of Orally Administered Mucic 
Acid Upon Renal Function, J. Lab. and Clin. Med. 11, 824. 

Smith, G. F. The Use of Bromate in Volumetric Analysis. IV. The Preparation 
and Properties of Normal and Basic Mercuric Bromate, J.A.C.S. 48, 7. 

Taylor, J. B. Magnetic Moments of the Alkali Metal Atoms, Phys. Rev. 28, 576. 

Yntema, L. F. The New Elements, School Sci. and Math. 26, 707. 

Yntema, L. F. Observations on the Rare Earths. XXIV. A Theory of Color, 
J.A.C.S. 48, 1598. 



94 University of Illinois 



1927 

Adams, Roger. Annual Survey of American Chemistry. II. Chap. 23, Carbo- 

cyclic Series, Chemical Catalog Co., New York. 
Adams, Roger and Arvin, James A. Certain omega-Cyclopentenyl Alkyl Acetic 

Acids and Their Action Toward B. Leprae. IX, J.A.C.S. 49, 2940. 
Adams, Roger and Barnes, O. A. Piperidyl and Substituted Piperidyl Alkyl 

para-Aminobenzoates. Ill, J.A.C.S. 49, 1307. 
Adams, Roger and Bray, R. H. Selective Reduction of Furfuracrolein by Means 

of Platinum Oxide-Platinum Black and Hydrogen. XVI, J.A.C.S. 49, 2101. 
Adams, Roger and Brubaker, M. M. The Structure of the Condensation 

Products of ortho-Phthalaldehydic Acids with Phenol and Phenol Esters. 

VIII, J.A.C.S. 49, 2279. 

Adams, Roger, Cohen, F. L., and Rees, O. W. The Reduction of Aromatic 

Nitro Compounds to Amines with Hydrogen and Platinum Oxide-Platinum 

Black as a Catalyst. XIV, J.A.C.S. 49, 1093. 
Adams, Roger and Heckel, Hermann. Cyclic Alkamine Esters of para-Amino- 

benzoic Acid. II, J.A.C.S. 49, 1303. 
Adams, Roger and Hiers, G. S. The Catalytic Reduction of Di- and Tri- 

phenylamines with Hydrogen and Platinum Oxide-Platinum Black. XV, 

J.A.C.S. 49, 1099. 
Adams, Roger, Marvel, C. S., and others. Organic Synthesis. VII, John Wiley 

and Sons, New York. 
Adams, Roger and Puntambeker, S. V. Polyhydroxy-anthraquinones. VII. 

Structure and Synthesis of Hydroxy-anthrarufin and of Rufiopin, J.A.C.S. 

49, 486. 
Adams, Roger, Stanley, W. M., Ford, S. G., and Peterson, W. R. Various 

omega-Cyclohexylalkyl Alkyl Acetic Acids and Their Action Toward B. 

Leprae. VIII, J.A.C.S. 49, 2934. 
Adams, Roger and Stouder, Florence G. Polyhydroxy-methylanthraquinones. 

IX. Contribution to the Structure of Rubiadin, J.A.C.S. 49, 2043. 

Adams, Roger and Talbot, Ralph H. Alicyclic Derivatives of Resorcinol, 

J.A.C.S. 49, 2040. 
Adams, Roger and Tomecko, C. G. Synthesis of 9-, 10-, 11-, 12-, and 13-Hy- 

droxystearic Acids, J.A.C.S. 49, 520. 
Buswell, A. M. Pollution of Streams in Illinois, 111. State Water Survey, 

Bulletin 24. 
Buswell, A. M. Chemistry of Water and Sewage Treatment, American 

Chemical Society Monograph, Chemical Catalog Co., New York. 
Buswell, A. M. and Neave, S. L. Some Chemical Characteristics of Sewage 

Sludge, Ind. Eng. Chem. 19, 233. 
Buswell, A. M. and Neave, S. L. Fate of Grease in Sludge Digestion, Ind. Eng. 

Chem. 19, 1012. 
Buswell, A. M. and Neave, S. L. The Significance of Nitrogen Determinations 

in Sanitary Analysis, J. Am. Water Works Assoc. 17 , 388. 
Buswell, A. M. and Neave, S. L. A Resume of the Problem of Nitrogen 

Losses Through Denitrification, Soil Science 24, 285. 
Carothers, Wallace H., Bickford, C. F., and Hurwitz, G. J. The Preparation 

and Base Strengths of Some Amines, J.A.C.S. 49, 2908. 
Chanutin, Alfred. A Study of the Effect of Creatin on Growth and Its Disr 

tribution in the Tissues of Normal Rats, J. Biol. Chem. 75, 549. 
Clark, George L. Annual Survey of American Chemistry. II, Chap. 9, Chemical 

Catalog Co., New York. 
Clark, George L. X-Ray Examination of Materials, Chemical Catalog Co., 

New York. 
Hopkins, B S. Progress in the Concentration of Illinium (Abstract), Science 

66, 461. 
Hopkins, B S. Recently Discovered Elements, Proc. 7th Annual Session Ohio 

State Ed. Conference, 395. 
Hopkins, B S. Illinium-The New Rare Earth, J. Franklin Inst. 204, 1. 
Hopkins, B S., Rogers, R. A., and Lapp, C. J. New X-Ray Lines in Certain 

Rare Earth Samples, Phys. Review 25, 882. 



Department of Chemistry 95 

Hopkins, B S. and Stover, Norman M. Fungicidal and Bactericidal Action of 

Selenium and Tellurium Compounds, Ind. Eng. Chem. 19, 510. 
Keyes, D. B. Lacquer Solvents from Petroleum, Chem. Markets 20, 70S. 
Keyes, D. B. Review of Research Work on the Manufacture of Magnesium, 

Trans. Am. Electrochem. Soc. 51, 197. 
Keyes, D. B. Antifreeze Compounds, Ind. Eng. Chem. 19, 1119. 
Keyes, D. B. Improving Fractionating in Petroleum Refining, Chem. Met. Eng. 

34, 164. 
Keyes, D. B. and Shen, H. Y. Effect of Lacquer Plasticizer in Varnish, Paint, 

Oil, and Chem. Review, Nov. 10, p. 13. 
Layng, T. E. and Coffman, A. W. Effect of Weathering on the Softening and 

Solidification Points of Coal, Ind. Eng. Chem. 19, 924. 
Lindgren, J. M. Analysis of Burnt Refractories. Standard Samples Nos. 76, 77, 

and 78, Bureau of Standards Bulletin, March. 
Marvel, C. S., Adams, Roger, and others. Organic Synthesis. VII, John Wiley 

and Sons, New York. 
Marvel, C. S., Bailey, C. F., and Sparberg, M. S. A Synthesis of Taurine, 

J.A.C.S. 49, 1833. 
Marvel, C. S. and Bateman, Dorothy E. The Structure of the Hydrocarbon 

CitHis Obtained by the Dehydration of Tertiary - Butyldiphenylcarbinol, 

J.A.C.S. 49, 2914. 
Marvel, C. S., Hager, F. D., and Coffman, D. D. The Mechanism of the Re- 
action Between Lithium n-Butyl and Various Organic Halogen Compounds, 

J.A.C.S. 49, 2323. 
Marvel, C. S., MacIntire, H. J., and Ford, Stanley G. Certain Physical and 

Chemical Properties of Methyl Chloride, Refrig. Eng. 14, 115. 
Marvel, C. S., Merchant, R., and Wickert, J. N. Some Bromine Derivatives 

of Pentanoic and Hexanoic Acids, J.A.C.S. 49, 1828. 
Marvel, C. S., Zartman, W. H., and Bluthardt, O. D. Halogenated Tertiary 

Amines, J.A.C.S. 49, 2299. 
Noyes, W. A. Element No. 61, Science 65, 615. 
Noyes, W. A. Illinium, Zeit. anorg. allgem. Chem. 168, 264. 
Noyes, W. A. The Contribution of Science to the Welfare of the Nation — 

America's Opportunity in Chemistry, Sci. Monthly 24, 205. 
Noyes, W. A. Magnetic Hydrogen Atoms and Non-Magnetic Molecules, Proc. 

Nat. Acad. Sci. 13, 377. 
Noyes, W. A. The Relation of the Octet of Electrons to Ionization, Proc. Nat. 

Acad. Sci. 13, 379. 
Noyes, W. A. The Relation Between Shared Electrons and Valence; Principal 

and Contra Valences, Zeit. Physikal. Chem. 130, 323. 
Parr, S. W. A Brief Resume of the Fuel Field with Some Observations Relat- 
ing to the Fuels of the Future, Ind. Eng. Chem. 19, 7. 
Parr, S. W. Solid Fuels, Internat. Critical Tables 2, 130. 
Parr, S. W. and Coffman, A. W. Surface Tension of Metals with Reference to 

Soldering Conditions, Ind. Eng. Chem. 19, 1308. 
Parr, S. W. and Staley, W. D. The Reactivity of Coke, Ind. Eng. Chem. 19, 

820. 
Parr, S. W. and Straub, F. G. Embrittlement of Boiler Plate, Ind. Eng. Chem. 

19, 620. 
Phipps, T. E. and Taylor, J. B. The Magnetic Moment of the Hydrogen Atom, 

Phys. Reviews 29, 309. 
Reedy, J. H. and Fleming, C. S. Waste Sulfite Liquor as an Agricultural Spray, 

Chem. Met. Eng. 34, 159. 
Rodebush, W. H. The Deflection of a Beam of Atoms in an Inhomogeneous 

Magnetic Field, Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. 13, 50. 
Rodebush, W. H. Chemical Constants and Absolute Entropy, Proc. Nat. Acad. 

Sci. 13, 185. 
Rodebush, W. H. Thermal Equilibrium of Electrons in Metals: Contact Po- 
tentials and Thermoelectric Force, Chem. Reviews 4, 255. 
Rodebush, W. H. and Coons, C. C. A New Absolute Manometer for Low Pres- 
sures, J.A.C.S. 49, 1953. 



96 University of Illinois 



Rodebush, W. H. and De Vries, Thomas. The Thermal Dissociation of Iodine 

and Bromine, J.A.C.S. 49, 656. 
Rodebush, W. H. and Dixon, Alfred L. The Heat Capacities of Liquid Metals, 

J.A.C.S. 49, 1162. 
Rose, William C. and Bunney, W. E. Are Arginine, Glutamic Acid and 

Aspartic Acid Necessary Components of the Diet During Growth? Science 

66, 433. 
Rose, William C, Helmer, Oscar M., and Chanutin, Alfred. A Modified 

Method for the Estimation of Total Creatinine in Small Amounts of 

Tissues, J. Biol. Chem. 75, 543. 
Rose, William C. and Westerman, Beulah D. The Availability of Disulfide 

Acids as Supplementary Agents in Diets Deficient in Cystine, J. Biol. Chem. 

75, 533. 
Straub, Frederick G. Embrittlement of Boiler Plate, Blast Furnace and Steel 

Plant 15, 94. 
Straub, Frederick G. Embrittlement of Boiler Plate, Forging, Stamping and 

Heat Treating 13, 89. 
Straub, Frederick G. Embrittlement of Boiler Plate, Am. Society for Testing 

Metals 27, 52. 
Thompson, A. P., Kremers, H. C, and Holton, W. B. The Preparation and 

Some Properties of Metallic Yttrium, Trans. Am. Electrochem. Soc. 49, 277. 

1928 

Adams, Roger. Chaulmoogra Oil and Synthetics in Leprosy, Clin. Med. and 

Surgery 35, 747. 
Adams, Roger and Arvin, J. A. A 2 -Cyclopentenylethyl Alkyl Acetic Acids and 

Their Bactericidal Action Toward B. Leprae. XII, J.A.C.S. 50, 1790. 
Adams, Roger and Arvin, J. A. Cyclopropylmethyl Alkyl Acetic Acids and Their 

Bactericidal Action Toward B. Leprae. XIII, J.A.C.S. 50, 1983. 
Adams, Roger and Davies, Letha A. The Structures of Convolvulonic and 

Jalapinolic Acids. Synthesis of 11-Hydroxypentadecanoic and 11-Hydroxy- 

hexadecanoic Acids, J.A.C.S. 50, 1749. 
Adams, Roger and Davies, Letha A. Di-(Cyclohexylalkyl) Acetic Acids. XIV, 

J.A.C.S. 50, 2297. 
Adams, Roger and Hamilton, T. S. Reduction of Pyridine Hydrochloride and 

Pyridonium Salts by Means of Hydrogen and Platinum Oxide-Platinum 

Black. XVIII, J.A.C.S. 50, 2260. 
Adams, Roger and Hyde, J. F. Study of the Possible Isomerism of Certain 

Analogs of Resolvable Diphenyl Compounds, J.A.C.S. 50, 2499. 
Adams, Roger, Hyde, J. F., and Browning, E. Synthetic Homologs of d-, 

1-Ephedrine, J.A.C.S. 50, 2287. 
Adams, Roger and Marshall, J. R. The Use of Platinum Oxide-Platinum 

Black in the Catalytic Reduction of Aromatic Hydrocarbons. XVII, 

J.A.C.S. 50, 1970. 
Adams, Roger, Stanley, W. M., and Stearns, H. A. Cyclohexyl and Cyclo- 

hexylmethyl Alkyl Acetic Acids and Their Action Toward B. Leprae. X, 

J.A.C.S. 50, 1475. 
Adams, Roger and Yohe, G. R. Cyclopentyl Alkyl Acetic Acids and omega- 

Cyclopentylethyl Alkyl Acetic Acids and Their Bactericidal Action Toward 

B. Leprae. XI, J.A.C.S. 50, 1503. 
Bennett, Chester Wallace. The Ketazines of Levulinic Acid and of Levulinic 

Hydrazide, J.A.C.S. 50, 1747. 
Buswell, A. M. Das Essener Heft, Eng. News Record 100, 980. 
Buswell, A. M. Submerged Contact Aerators for Sewage Treatment, by Imhoff, 

Dr. Karl, Eng. News Record 101, 580. (Translation) 
Buswell, A. M., Lehmann, E. W., and Kelleher, R. C. A Study of Factors 

Affecting the Efficiency and Design of Farm Septic Tanks, 111. State Water 

Survey, Bulletin 27 . 
Buswell, A. M. and Neave, S. L. Treatment and Disposal of Distillery Slop by 

Anerobic Digestion Methods, Ind. Eng. Chem. 20, 837. 



Department of Chemistry 97 

Buswell, A. M. and Neave, S. L. Alkaline Digestion of Sewage Grease, Ind. 

Eng. Chem. 20, 1368. 
Buswell, A. M., Shive, R. A., and Neave, S. L. Bioprecipitation Studies, 111. 

State Water Survey, Bulletin 25. 
Buswell, A. M., Shive, R. A., and Neave, S. L. Removal of Colloids from 

Sewage, 111. State Water Survey, Circular 3. 
Buswell, A. M., Strickhouser, S. I., and others. The Depth of Sewage Filters 

and the Degree of Purification, 111. State Water Survey, Bulletin 26. 
Clark, George L. The X-Ray Diagnosis of Chemical and Industrial Materials, 

and a New Type of Biological and Medical Diagnosis, Radiology 10, 185. 
Clark, George L. Recommended Equipment of a Modern X-Ray Laboratory for 

the Study of Structures of Materials, Ind. Eng. Chem. 20, 1386. 
Clark, George L. A Symposium on Atomic Structure and Valence. Introduc- 
tion, Chem. Reviews 5, 361. 
Clark, George L. The X-Ray Examination of Metallurgical Materials, Heat 

Treating and Forging 14, 138, 256. 
Clark, George L. Spectroscopic Study of Fuels and Analysis of Detonation 

Theories, J. Soc. Automotive Eng. 23, 167. 
Clark, George L. X-Rays and the Heat Treatment of Metals, Heat Treating and 

Forging 14, 1150. 
Clark, George L. The X-Ray Identification and Specification of Asbestos, 

Asbestos 10, 2; Cement-Mill and Quarry 33, 24. 
Clark, George L., King, A. J., and Hyde, J. F. The Crystal Structures of the 

Alkaline Earth Metals, Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. 14, 617. 
Cox, Gerald J. The Preparation of d-Arginine Monohydrochloride, J. Biol. 

Chem. 78, 475. 
Cox, Gerald J., Briggs, Frances, and Hudson, Leona. The Determination of 

Ammonia by Aeration, J. Lab. and Clin. Med. 14, 159. 
Cox, Gerald J. and Eagles, Blythe Alfred. The Availability of Ergothioneine 

in Supplementing Rations Deficient in Histidine, J. Biol. Chem. 80, 249. 
Elder, A. L. and Rees, O. W. Effect of Certain Illinois Waters on Lead, J. Am. 

Water Works Assoc. 19, 714. 
Elder, L. W., Jr. and Wright, W. H. pH Measurement with the Glass Electrode 

and Vacuum Tube Potentiometer, Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. 14, 936. 
Fuson, R. C. The Cleavage of Diethyl alpha, alpha'-Dibromoadipate by Diethyl- 
amine, J.A.C.S. 50, 1444. 
Hopkins, B S. and Boss, Arthur Evan. Observations on the Rare Earths. 

XXVI. The Purification and Atomic Weight of Erbium, J.A.C.S. 50, 298. 
Hopkins, B S. and Holton, Wm. B. Observations on the Rare Earths. XXV. 

Examination of Certain Rare Earth Materials for Element No. 72, J.A.C.S. 

50, 255. 
Hopkins, B S., Quill, L. L., and Selwood, Pierce W. Observations on the Rare 

Earths. XXX. Studies in the Absorption Spectra, J.A.C.S. 50, 2929. 
Howard, F. C. Carbon Deposition Near Furnace Top, The Iron Age 122, 271. 
Howard, F. C. The Future Outlook for Artificial Fertilizers, Chem. Markets 23, 

379. 
Howard, F. C. and Moore, H. F. A Metallographic Study of the Path of Fatigue 

Failure in Copper, .Univ. of 111., Bulletin 176. 
Howard, F. C. and Moore, H. F. A Metallographic Study of the Path of Fatigue 

Failure in Copper, The Metal Industry (London) 32, 589. 
Keyes, D. B. A Method of Fractionating Natural Gasoline, Chem. Met. Eng. 35, 

92. 
Keyes, D. B. Future Solvent Developments, Chem. Markets 22, 521. 
Keyes, D. B., Soukup, Roy, and Nichols, W. A., Jr. Design of Fractionating 

Columns, Ind. Eng. Chem. 20, 464. 
Keyes, D. B., Swann, Sherlock, Jr., and Hoerr, H. W. Conductivity of Organic 

Solvents, J. Am. Electrochem. Soc. 54, 127. 
Keyes, D. B., Swann, Sherlock, Jr., Klabunde, W., and Schicktanz, S. T. 

Electrodeposition of Aluminum, Ind. Eng. Chem. 20, 1068. 
Keyes, D. B., Taylor, R. K., and Mason, D. B. Variation of Boiling Point with 



98 University of Illinois 



Composition for Liquid Mixtures of Volatile Constituents, Internat. Critical 

Tables 3, 308. 
Krase, Norman W. Electric Welding Joins the Field in High Pressure Equip- 
ment, Chem. Met. Eng. 35, 611. 
Krase, Norman W. High Pressure Gas Research at Univ. of 111., Chem. Met. 

Eng. 35, 463. 
Krase, Norman W. Nitrogen-Oxygen-Nitrogen Oxide Equilibria, J. Phys. Chem. 

32, 463. 
Krase, Norman W. and Mackey, Bill. New High Temperature Fixation Re- 
actions of Nitrogen, J. Phys. Chem. 32, 1488. 
Kremers, H. A. and Klelnheksel, J. H. Observations on the Rare Earths. 

XXIX. The Preparation and Properties of Some Anhydrous Rare Earth 

Chlorides, J.A.C.S. 50, 959. 
Kremers, H. A. and Neckers, J. W. Observations on the Rare Earths. XXVII. 

(I.) Fractional Precipitation of the Cerium Group Earths by Electrolysis. 

(II.) Solubility of Rare Earth Oxalates in Nitric Acid, J.A.C.S. 50, 950. 
Kremers, H. A. and Neckers, J. W. Observations on the Rare Earths. XXVIII. 

The Separation of Cerium, J.A.C.S. 50, 955. 
Kremers, H. A. and Thomas, D. C. The Use of Misch Metal as an Electrolytic 

Rectifier, Trans. Am. Electrochem. Soc. 44, 237. 
Kremers, H. A. and Yntema, L. F. Carbon Resister Furnaces for Laboratory 

Use, Ind. Eng. Chem. 20, 770. 
Layng, T. E. Action of Accelerators and Inhibitors Upon the Oxidation of 

Liquid Hydrocarbons, Ind. Eng. Chem. 20, 1048. 
Layng, T. E. and Coffman, A. W. A Differential Index of the Coking Power 

of Coal, Ind. Eng. Chem. 20, 165. 
Layng, T. E. and Soukup, Roy. Partial Oxidation of Methane and Ethane in 

the Presence of Catalysts, Ind. Eng. Chem. 20, 1052. 
Layng, T. E. and Youker, M. A. Action of Accelerators and Inhibitors Upon 

the Oxidation of Liquid Hydrocarbons, Ind. Eng. Chem. 20, 1048. 
Marvel, C. S., Blomquist, A. T., and Vaughn, L. E. Di-Normal-Butyl Ether 

as a Solvent for the Grignard Reagent, J.A.C.S. 50, 2810. 
Marvel, C. S. and Gauerke, Chester G. The Action of Cyclohexylmagnesium 

Bromide on Derivatives of Oxalic Acid, J.A.C.S. 50, 1178. 
Marvel, C. S. and Hsueh, Chi-Ming. Optically Active Hypnotics, J.A.C.S. 50, 

855. 
Marvel, C. S. and Merchant, R. beta- Vinyl Piperidine, J.A.C.S. 50, 1197. 
Marvel, C. S. and Rossander, S. S. The Reaction of the Grignard Reagent with 

gamma-Chloropropyl para-Toluenesulfonate. A Method of Lengthening 

Carbon Chains by Three Carbon Atoms, J.A.C.S. 50, 1491. 
Marvel, C. S. and Salzberg, Paul L. Hexa - Tertiary - Butylethynylethane, 

J.A.C.S. 50, 1737. 
Marvel, C. S. and Salzberg, Paul L. The Action of Silver on Diphenyl- 

Tertiary-Butylethynylbromomethane, J.A.C.S. 50, 2840. 
Marvel, C. S. and Sandborn, L. T. Local Anesthetics Derived from beta- 

Piperidyl Carbinol, J.A.C.S. 50, 563. 
Noyes, W. A. The Interaction Between Nitrogen Trichloride and Nitric Oxide. 

Reactions of Compounds with Odd Electrons, J.A.C.S. 50, 2902. 
Noyes, W. A. Dufton Distilling Column for Preparation of Absolute Alcohol, 

Ind. Eng. Chem. 20, 1190. 
Noyes, W. A. The Relation of Shared Electrons to Potential and Absolute 

Polar Valences, Chem. Reviews, 5, 549. 
Parr, S. W. The Classification of Coal, Univ. of 111., Bulletin 180. 
Parr, S. W. Some Combustion Problems in Their Relation to Public Health, 

Ind. Eng. Chem. 20, 454. 
Parr, S. W. and Straub, Frederick G. Embrittlement of Boiler Plate, Univ. of 

III, Bulletin 177. 
Parr, S. W. and Straub, Frederick G. Embrittlement of Boiler Plate, Ind. Eng. 

Chem. 19, 620. 
Phipps, T. E. and Leslie, R. T. Transference Numbers of Ions in Solid Sodium 

Chloride at High Temperatures, J.A.C.S. 50, 2412. 



Department of Chemistry 99 

Reedy, J. H. Objectives and Content of the Elementary College Course in 

Qualitative Analysis, J. Chem. Ed. 5, 937. 
Rodebush, W. H. The Electron Theory of Valence, Chem. Reviews 5, 509. 
Rodebush, W. H. Valence and the Rule of Eight, Nature 122, 56. 
Rodebush, W. H. and Michalek, J. C. The Effect of Intensive Drying on the 

Vapor Pressure and Vapor Density of Ammonium Chloride, Proc. Nat. 

Acad. Sci. 14, 131. 
Rodebush, W. H. and Peterson, J. Merriam. A Cryoscopic Study of Benzene 

Solutions, J. Phys. Chem. 32, 709. 
Rose, Wm. C. Does the Amount of Food Consumed Influence the Growth of an 

Animal? Science 67, 488. 
Rose, Wm. C. and Bunney, W. Edward. Growth Upon Diets Practically Devoid 

of Arginine, with Some Observations Upon the Relation of Glutamic and 

Aspartic Acids to Nutrition, J. Biol. Chem. 76, 521. 
Rose, Wm. C, Ellis, Ruth H., and Helming, Oscar C. The Transformation 

of Creatine into Creatinine by the Male and Female Human Organism, 

J. Biol. Chem. 77, 171. 
Rose, Wm. C, Jackson, Richard W., and Sommer, Beatrice E. Experiments 

on the Nutritive Properties of Gelatin, J. Biol. Chem. 80, 167. 
Rose, Wm. C. and Westerman, Beulah D. The Oxidation of Disulfide Acids in 

the Animal Organism, J. Biol. Chem. 79, 423. 
Rose, Wm. C. and Westerman, Beulah D. The Availability of Disulfide Acids 

as Supplementing Agents in Diets Deficient in Cystine. II. alpha-Dihydroxy- 

beta-Dithiodipropionic Acid, J. Biol. Chem. 79, 413. 
Shriner, R. L. and Anderson, R. J. A Contribution to the Chemistry of Grape 

Pigments. V. The Anthocyans in Ives Grapes, J. Biol. Chem. 80, 743. 
Shriner, R. L. and Ko, Luther. Some Derivatives of Cholesterol, J. Biol. 

Chem. 80, 1. 
Villars, Donald Statler. The Degree of Association of Sodium Vapor, Proc. 

Nat. Acad. Sci. 14, 508. 
Villars, Donald Statler. Bandenspektren und Electronentarme der Molekiile 

Na 2 , NaK, und K 2 , Naturwissecschaften 16, 219. 

1929 

Adams, Roger and Lycan, W. H. omega-Hydroxy Aliphatic Acids. Synthesis 
of Sabinic Acid, J.A.C.S. 51, 625. 

Adams, Roger and Lycan, W. H. omega-Hydroxy Aliphatic Acids. II. Con- 
version of omega-Hydroxydecanoic Acid to Chain Poly-Intermolecular 
Esters and to a Dimeric Cyclic Ester, J.A.C.S. 51, 3450. 

Adams, Roger and Moyer, W. W. Stereoisomerism of Diphenyl Compounds. 
Resolution of 3, 3'-Diamino Dimesityl. II, J.A.C.S. 51, 630. 

Adams, Roger and Stanley, W. M. Stereochemistry of Diphenyl Compounds. 
The Resolution of 2, 2'-Diphydroxy-3, 3'-Dicarboxy-l, l'-Dinaphthyl. Ill, 
Recueil Des Travaux Chimiques Des Pays-Bas 48, 1035. 

Adams, Roger and Stanley, W. M. The Synthesis of Chaulmoogric Acid from 
Hydnocarpic Acid, J.A.C.S. 51, 1515. 

Adams, Roger, Stanley, W. M., and Jay, Marian S. The Preparation of Cer- 
tain Octadecanoic Acids and Their Bactericidal Action Toward B. Leprae. 
XV, J.A.C.S. 51, 1261. 

Buswell, A. M. Control of Scum in Sewage Tanks, Ind. Eng. Chem. 21, 322. 

Buswell, A. M. The Improvement of the Taste of Chlorinated Drinking Water 
by the Use of Activated Charcoal Filters, by Imhoff, Dr. Karl, and Sierp, 
F., Public Works 60, 308. (Translation) 

Buswell, A. M. and Boruff, C. S. Fermentation Products of Cellulose, Ind. 
Eng. Chem. 21, 1181. 

Buswell, A. M. and Elder, A. L. Changes of Sulfur Compounds During 
Sewage Treatment, Ind. Eng. Chem. 21, 560. 

Buswell, A. M. and Pearson, E. L. The Nidus (Nest) Rack, A Modern De- 
velopment of the Travis Colloider, Sewage Works J. 1, 187. 

Buswell, A. M. and Symons, G. E. Biochemical Oxygen Demand of Certain 
Substances, Ind. Eng. Chem., Anal. Ed. 1, 161. 



100 University of Illinois 



Buswell, A. M. and Symons, G. E. Comparison of Dilution and Absorption 

Methods for the Determination of Biochemical Oxygen Demand, Ind. Eng. 

Chem., Anal. Ed. 1, 214. 
Clark, George L. Rubber As It Is Revealed by X-Rays, India Rubber World, 

79, 55. 
Clark, George L. X-Ray Applications in Everyday Life, The Sci. Monthly 28, 

172. 
Clark, George L. X-Ray Contributions to the Problem of Polymerization, Ind. 

Eng. Chem. 21, 128. 
Clark, George L. X-Ray Investigations of Optically Active Compounds. I. A 

Proof of Molecular Asymmetry in Optically Active Phenylaminoacetic Acid, 

J.A.C.S. 51, 2796. 
Clark, George L. X-Ray Metallography in 1929, Metals and Alloys, 1, 14, 57, 

98, 153, 206. 
Clark, George L. X-Ray Applications in Every-Day Engineering Problems, 

Trans. Am. Soc. of Mech. Eng., Fuels and Steam Power, 51, 27. 
Clark, George L. and Anderson, H. V. X-Ray Study of the Zonal Structure 

of Silica Brick from the Roof of a Basic Open-Hearth Furnace, Ind. Eng. 

Chem. 21, 781. 
Clark, George L. and Anderson, H. V. Application of X-Rays in the Classifica- 
tion of Fibrous Silicate Minerals Commonly Termed Asbestos, Ind. Eng. 

Chem. 21, 924. 
Clark, George L. and Boruff, C. S. The Effect of X-Rays on Bacteria, Science 

70, 74. 
Clark, George L. and King, A. J. The Crystal Structure of Barium, J.A.C.S. 

51, 1709. 
Clark, George L. and Scraggie, Arthur G. The Crystal Structure of Anhydrous 

Silicotungstic Acid and Related Compounds, and Their Probable Molecular 

Formulas, Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. 15, 12. 
Clark, George L. and Smith, H. A. Ultra-Violet Spectroscopy of the Flames of 

Motor Fuels. IV. The Practical Utilization of a Small Quartz-Prism 

Spectograph for the Quantitative Determination of Lead Tetraethyl in 

Gasoline, J. Phys. Chem. 33, 659. 
Clark, George L. and Tschentke, H. L. Physico-Chemical Studies on the 

Mechanism of the Drying of Linseed Oil. I. Changes in Density of Films, 

Ind. Eng. Chem. 21, 621. 
Clark, George L. and Van Orden, S. L. Eine Rontgenographische Studie 

einiger Asbestosorten aus Verschiedenen Minen, Kautschuk 5, 28. 
Cox, Gerald J. and King, Harriette. Note on the Preparation of the Mono- 
ammo Acids from Their Picrates, J. Biol. Chem. 84, 533. 
Cox, Gerald J., King, Harriette, and Berg, C. P. The Preparation of Lysine, 

Histidine and Arginine from Hydrolyzed Blood Corpuscle Paste by Elec- 
trical Transport, J. Biol. Chem. 81, 755. 
Cox, Gerald J., Smythe, C. V., and Fishback, C. F. The Nephropathogenic 

Action of Cystine, J. Biol. Chem. 82, 95. 
Elder, L. W., Jr. pH Measurement with the Glass Electrode and Vacuum Tube 

Potentiometer, J.A.C.S. 51, 3266. 
Englis, D. T. and Day, W. N. The Composition of Peculiar Clinkers Found in 

Snags after Forest Fires, Science 69, 605. 
Englis, D. T. and Gerber, Louis. A Study of Diastase Activity in Plants: The 

Effect of Phosphates in the Soil Media, Soil Sci. 28, 221. 
Englis, D. T. and Mills, V. C. The Determination of the Saponification Num- 
ber — a More Stable Alcoholic Potash Reagent, J. Assoc, of Official Agr. 

Chemists 12, 248. 
Fuson, R. C. and Bradley, R. L. The Cleavage of Diethyl Alpha, Alpha'-Di- 

bromoadipate by Secondary Amines, J.A.C.S. 51, 599. 
Fuson, R. C. and Kao, Tsi Yu. The Mechanism of the Cleavage of Diethyl 

Alpha, Alpha'-Dibromoadipate by Secondary Amines. A New Synthesis of 

Cyclobutane Derivatives, J.A.C.S. 51, 1536. 



Department of Chemistry 101 

Hopkins, B S. and Selwood, Pierce W. Ionic Migration and Magnetism in the 

Separation of the Rare Earths. Observations on the Rare Earths. XXXI, 

Trans. Am. Electrochem. Soc. 55, 59. 
Howard, F. C. and Dunn, E. T. Crystalline Changes in Copper Due to Anneal- 
ing, Ind. Eng. Chem. 21, 550. 
Johnstone, H. F. and Taylor, Edmund. Determination of the Sulfur Content of 

Gases from Boiler Furnaces, Ind. Eng. Chem., Anal. Ed. 1, 197. 
Keyes, D. B. In Quest of the Original Reflux, The Sci. Monthly 28, 274. 
Keyes, D. B. Improving Fractionation for Cracking Processes, Chem. Met. Eng. 

36, 78. 
Keyes, D. B. Distillation and Fractionating Processes Used in the Alcohol 

Industry, Trans. 111. State Acad. Sci., 236. 
Keyes, D. B. The Manufacture of Anhydrous Ethyl Alcohol, Ind. Eng. Chem. 

21, 998. 
Keyes, D. B. Equipment for Gas-Liquid Reactions, Univ. of 111., Bulletin 27, 1. 
Keyes, D. B., Swann, Sherlock, Jr., and King, E. P. Studies in Liquid Partial 

Oxidation. (I), Ind. Eng. Chem. 21, 1227. 
King, A. J. The Crystal Structure of Strontium, Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. 15, 337. 
Krase, Norman W. How Does Carbon Dioxide Behave Under Pressure? Chem. 

Met. Eng. 36, 162. 
Krase, Norman W. Wood Distillation Still Prospers in Southern States, Chem. 

Met. Eng. 36, 397. 
Krase, Norman W. Solvent Extraction Obviates Waste in Acetic Acid Pro- 
duction, Chem. Met. Eng. 36, 657. 
Kremers, H. C. and Quill, L. L. Fractional Hydrolysis of Rare Earths by 

Electrolysis. Observations on Rare Earths. XXXII, Trans. Am. Electro- 
chem. Soc. 55, 199. 
Marvel, C. S. and Birkhimer, E. R. The Preparation of the Sodium Salts of 

omega-Hydroxybutyric, -Valeric and -Caproic Acids, J.A.C.S. 51, 260. 
Marvel, C. S. and Coffman, D. D. The Reaction Between Alkali Metal Alkyls 

and Quaternary Phosphonium Halides, J.A.C.S. 51, 3496. 
Marvel, C. S. and Corley, R. C. Amino Acid Catabolism. III. The Fate of 

the omega-Hydroxy Derivatives of Propionic, Butyric, Valeric, and Caproic 

Acids in the Phlorhizinized Dog, J. Biol. Chem. 82, 77. 
Marvel, C. S., Helfrick, M. D., and Belsley, J. P. Identification of Amines. 

IV. Methanesulfonamides, J.A.C.S. 51, 1272. 
Marvel, C. S. and Howk, B. W. Fatty Acids of Filter-Press Cake from Spent 

Soap Lye, Ind. Eng. Chem. 21, 1137. 
Marvel, C. S. and Rossander, S. S. Symmetrical Diphenyl-Tetra-Tertiary- 

Butylethynylethane, J.A.C.S. 51, 932. 
Marvel, C. S., Scott, E. W., and Amstutz, K. L. Identification of Amines. V. 

Derivatives of Tertiary Amines, J.A.C.S. 51, 3638. 
Marvel, C. S. and Shelton, R. S. Local Anesthetics Derived from 2- (Beta- 

Hydroxyethyl)— Piperidine, J.A.C.S. 51, 915. 
Neave, S. L. Innovations in the Treatment of Leipzig Sewage, Sewage Works J. 

1, 651. 
Noyes, W. A. The Electronic Interpretation of Oxidation and Reduction, 

J.A.C.S. 51, 2391. 
Noyes, W. A. and Bennett, C. A. Optically Active Diazo Compounds. IV. A 

Stable Alicyclic Diazo Amine, Recueil Des Travaux Chimiques Des Pays- 

Bas 48, 896. 
Parr, Rosalie M. Therapeutic Values in Some Rare Element Compounds. 

Preliminary Report, Trans. 111. State Acad. Sci. 21, 194. 
Phipps, T. E. and Kurt, O. E. Magnetic Moment of the Oxygen Atom, Phys. 

Review 34, 1357. 
Phipps, T. E. and Partridge, E. G. Temperature-Conductance Curves of Solid 

Salts. II. Halides of Potassium and Thallium, J.A.C.S. 51, 1331. 
Quill, L. L. and Hopkins, B S. Recent Progress in Illinium, Trans. 111. State 

Acad. Sci. 21, 198. 



102 University of Illinois 



Quill, L. L. and Selwood, Pierce W. Electrode Holder for Arc Spectrum 
Analysis, Ind. Eng. Chem., Anal. Ed. 1, 180. 

Rees, O. W. Occurrence of Silicates in Natural Waters, Ind. Eng. Chem., Anal. 
Ed. 1, 200. 

Rodebush, W. H. The Entropy of Hydrogen, Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. 15, 678. 

Rodebush, W. H. and Michalek, J. C. The Vapor Pressure and Vapor Density 
of Intensively Dried Ammonium Chloride, J.A.C.S. 51, 748. 

Rodebush, W. H. and Peterson, J. M. The Electrolysis of Metallo-Organic 
Compounds, J.A.C.S. 51, 638. 

Rose, Wm. C, Berg, C. P., and Marvel, C. S. The Biological Substitution of 
Synthetic Compounds in Place of Tryptophane for Purposes of Growth, 
Proc. of the 13th Internat. Physiological Congress, Boston. 

Rose, Wm. C, Berg, C. P., and Marvel, C. S. Tryptophane and Growth. I. 
Growth Upon a Tryptophane-Deficient Basal Diet Supplemented at Vary- 
ing Intervals by the Separate Feeding of Tryptophane, J. Biol. Chem. 82, 
479. 

Rose, Wm. C, Berg, C. P., and Marvel, C. S. Tryptophane and Growth. II. 
Growth Upon a Tryptophane-deficient Basal Diet Supplemented with 
Tryptophane Derivatives, J. Biol. Chem. 85, 207. 

Rose, Wm. C, Berg, C. P., and Marvel, C. S. Tryptophane and Growth. III. 
3-Indolepropionic Acid and 3-Indolepyruvic Acid as Supplementing Agents 
in Diets Deficient in Tryptophane, J. Biol. Chem. 85, 219. 

Rose, Wm. C. and Catherwood, Florence L. Do Baking Powder Residues 
Exert Injurious Effect Upon Growth and Nutrition? J. Nutrition 2, 155. 

Rose, Wm. C. and Hyde, Elizabeth C. Arginine Feeding and Creatine-Creati- 
nine Excretion in Man, J. Biol. Chem. 84, 535. 

Shriner, R. L. and Kleiderer, E. C. Synthesis of Some Chalkones, J.A.C.S. 51, 
1267. 

Shriner, R. L. and McCutchan, P. Preparation of Some Methylated Gallic 
Acids, J.A.C.S. 51, 2193. 

Shriner, R. L. and Schmidt, A. G. Preparation of Benzoylacetic Ester, T.A.C.S. 
51, 3636. 

Smith, G. Frederick. Rapid Dehydration of Alcohol Using Barium Oxide and 
Metallic Calcium, Ind. Eng. Chem., Anal. Ed. 1, 72. 

Smith, G. Frederick. Desicchlora (Anhydrous Barium Perchlorate). II. Ex- 
periments in Its Use as an Economical Drying Agent and Ammonia Absorb- 
ent, Chemist-Analyst 18, 18. 

Smith, G. Frederick. Anhydrone (Anhydrous Magnesium Perchlorate). A 
Perfect Substitute for P 2 5 to be Used as a Drying Agent, Chemist- 
Analyst 18, 6. 

Smith, G. Frederick, Hardy, V. R., and Gard, E. L. The Segregation of 
Analyzed Samples, Ind. Eng. Chem., Anal. Ed. 1, 228. 

Swann, Sherlock, Jr. The Electrolysis of Isomeric Caproic Acids, Trans. Am. 
Electrochem. Society 56, 457. 

Villars, D. C. What Happens During an Electron Jump? Nature 123, 240. 

Yntema, L. F. The Separation of Columbium and Tantalum by Electrolytic 
Hydrolysis, Trans. Am. Electrochem. Soc. 55, 209. 

Yntema, L. F. and Winters, R. W. The Preparation of Beryllium Chloride 
from Beryl, Trans. Am. Electrochem. Soc. 55, 205. 

1930 

Adams, Roger and Armendt, B. F. Certain Dialkyl Acetic Acids Containing 12, 

13, and 14 Carbon Atoms and Their Bactericidal Action Toward B. Leprae. 

XVIII, J.A.C.S. 52, 1289. 
Adams, Roger, Bock, L. H., and Moyer, W. W. Stereochemistry of Diphenyl 

Compounds. V. Preparation and Resolution of 2, 4, 6, 2', 4', 6'-Hexanitro-3, 

3'-Dicarboxydiphenyl, J.A.C.S. 52, 2054. 
Adams, Roger and Bousquet, E. W. Substituted Phenylethylbarbituric Acids, 

J.A.C.S. 52, 224. 



Department of Chemistry 103 

Adams, Roger and Browning, E. Stereochemistry of Diphenylbenzenes. Prepa- 
ration of Stereoisomeric 3, 6-Di-(2, 4-Dimethylphenyl)-2, 5-Dibromohydro- 
quinones and Their Derivatives. IX, J.A.C.S. 52, 4098. 

Adams, Roger, Browning, E., and Woodrow, H. W. Preparation and Bacterio- 
logical Action Toward B. Leprae of Certain O'lefinic Acids. XVII, J.A.C.S. 
52, 1281. 

Adams, Roger and Ford, S. G. Cyclobutylalkyl Alkyl Acetic Acids and Their 
Bactericidial Action Toward B. Leprae. XVI, J.A.C.S. 52, 1259. 

Adams, Roger and Greer, C. M. Preparation and Bactericidal Properties of 
Certain Pentadecanoic, Heptadecanoic and Nonadecanoic Acids. XIX, 
J.A.C.S. 52, 2540. 

Adams, Roger, Hale, J. B., and Lycan, W. H. Synthesis of Nervonic Acid, 
J.A.C.S. 52, 4536. 

Adams, Roger and Maxwell, R. W. Study of the Possible Isomerism of Certain 
Analogs of Resolvable Diphenyl Compounds. VII, J.A.C.S. 52, 2959. 

Adams, Roger and Stanley, W. M. The Stereochemical Study of Diphenyl 2, 
2'-Disulfonic Acid. VIII, J.A.C.S. 52, 4471. 

Adams, Roger and Stanley, W. M. The Stereoisomerism of Diphenyl Com- 
pounds. IV, J.A.C.S. 52, 1200. 

Adams, Roger and Stearns, H. A. Stereochemistry of Diphenyl Compounds. 
VI. Preparation and Resolution of 2, 4, 6, 2', 4'-Pentanitro-3-Carboxy- 
diphenyl, J.A.C.S. 52, 2070. 

Adams, Roger and Steele, Catherine Cassels. Stereochemistry of Phenyl- 
pyridine Compounds: The Preparation and Investigation of 2-(2-Carboxy- 
6-Chlorophenyl)-Pyridine-3-Carboxylic Acid and 3-(2-Carboxyphenyl)-6- 
Phenylpyridine-2, 4-Dicarboxylic Acid. X, J.A.C.S. 52, 4528. 

Adams, Roger and Stoughton, R. W. Stereochemistry of Diphenyl Compounds. 
The Preparation and Resolution of 2-Methyl-6-Nitro-2'-Carboxydiphenyl. 
XI, J.A.C.S. 52, 5263. 

Audrieth, L. F. The Preparation of Semicarbazide, J.A.C.S. 52, 1250. 

Audrieth, L. F. Parallelism in the Decomposition of Ammonium, Hydrazine, 
and Hydroxylammonium Nitrites. Hyponitrous Acid as a Hydroxylamino- 
Nitrous Acid, J. Phys. Chem. 34, 538. 

Audrieth, L. F. A Classification of Compounds of Hydrogen and Nitrogen, J. 
Chem. Ed. 7, 2055. 

Audrieth, L. F. Hydroxylamine as the Parent Substance of a System of Acids, 
Bases, and Salts, Trans. 111. State Acad. Sci. 22, 385. 

Bailar, John C, Jr. The Effect of Substituents Upon the Rearrangement of 
Benzopinacol, J.A.C.S. 52, 3596. 

Boruff, C. S. Illinois River Studies, 1929-30, Ind. Eng. Chem. 22, 1252. 

Burks, Dana, Jr. Treatment of Water for Ice Manufacture, Univ. of 111. Eng. 
Expt. Sta., Bulletin 219. 

Buswell, A. M. Production of Fuel Gas by Anaerobic Fermentations, Ind. Eng. 
Chem. 22, 1168. 

Buswell, A. M. Studies on Two-Stage Sludge Digestion, 111. State Water 
Survey, Bulletin 29. 

Buswell, A. M. and Boruff, C. S. Fermentation Products from Cornstalks, 
Ind. Eng. Chem. 22, 931. 

Buswell, A. M. and Neave, S. L. The Anaerobic Oxidation of Fatty Acids, 
J.A.C.S. 52, 3308. 

Buswell, A. M. and Neave, S. L. Laboratory Studies of Sludge Digestion, 111. 
State Water Survey, Bulletin 30. 

Buswell, A. M., Symons, G. E., and Pearson, E. L. Observations on Two-Stage 
Sludge Digestion, 1928-1929, Sewage Works J. 2, 214. 

Clark, George L. Cellulose as It is Completely Revealed by X-Rays, Ind. Eng. 
Chem. 22, 474. 

Clark, George L. X-Rays Show the Way to Better Products, Chem. Markets 
26, 585. 

Clark, George L. The Present Status and Future Possibilities of X-Ray 
Research on Textiles, Am. Dyestuff Reporter 19, 60. 



104 University of Illinois 



Clark, George L. and Corrigan, Kenneth E. The Long Spacings of Rubber and 

Cellulose, Radiology 15, 117. 
Clark, George L., Hardy, V. R., and Willman, H. B. Ultra-Violet Spectroscopy 

of the Flames of Motor Fuels, J. Phys. Chem. 34, 1924. 
Clark, George L. and Pickett, Lucy W. Some New Experiments on the 

Chemical Effects of X-Rays and the Energy Relations Involved, J.A.C.S. 

52, 465. 
Clark, George L., Pickett, Lucy W., and Farr, Wanda K. Some Practical 

Results of an X-Ray Analysis of Cotton Fibers, Sci. 71, 293. 
Clark, George L., Pickett, Lucy W., and Johnson, Eva D. New Studies on the 

Chemical Effects of X-Rays, Radiology 15, 245. 
Clark, George L. and Stillwell, Chas. W. X-Ray Diffraction in Liquids, 

Radiology 15, 66. 
Clark, George L. and Stillwell, Chas. W. X-Ray Examination of Commercial 

Galvanized Iron by a Modified Reflection Method, Ind. Eng. Chem., Anal. 

Ed. 2, 266. 
Du Vigneaud, Vincent, Audrieth, L. F., and Loring, H. S. The Reduction of 

Cystine in Liquid Ammonia by Metallic Sodium, J.A.C.S. 52, 4500. 
Du Vigneaud, Vincent and Hollander, Lenore. The Resolution of Inactive 

Cystine, Proc. of Soc. for Experimental Biol, and Med. 28, 46. 
Englis, D. T. and Byer, W. J. Determination of Dextrose in the Presence of 

Levulose, Ind. Eng. Chem., Anal. Ed. 2, 121. 
Englis, D. T. and Zannis, C. D. The Effect of Ethylene Upon the Activity of 

Diastase and Invertase, J.A.C.S. 52, 797. 
Fuson, R. C. Some Recent Advances in Theoretical Organic Chemistry, Chem. 

Reviews 7 , 347. 
Fuson, R. C. and Connor, Ralph A. The Formation of Pyrrolidine Derivatives 

from Diethyl, Alpha, Alpha'-Dibromo-Adipate and Certain Secondary 

Amines, J.A.C.S. 52, 2985. 
Fuson, R. C, Fisher, C. Harold, and Oakwood, Thos. S. The Replacement of 

Halogen by Hydrogen in Alpha Halo-Ketones Under the Influence of the 

Grignard Reagent, J.A.C.S. 52, 5036. 
Fuson, R. C, Kreimeier, Oscar R., and Nimmo, Gilbert L. Ring Closures in 

the Cyclobutane Series. II. Cyclization of Alpha, Alpha'-Dibromo-Adipic 

Esters, J.A.C.S. 52, 4074. 
Fuson, R. C. and Walker, Joseph T. The Cleavage of Carbonyl Compounds by 

Alkalies. I. Trihalomethyl Ketones of the Mesitylene Series, J.A.C.S. 52, 

3269. 
Heubaum, Ulrich. The Use of Aryl Esters for the Preparation of Amides and 

Derivatives of Urea, J.A.C.S. 52, 2149. 
Hopkins, B S. and Selwood, Pierce W. Studies in Comparative Efficiencies of 

Rare Earth Separations, Trans. 111. State Acad. Sci. 22, 349. 
Keyes, D. B. and Swann, Sherlock, Jr. Studies in the Electrodeposition of 

Metals, Univ. of 111. Eng. Expt. Sta., Bulletin 206. 
Keyes, D. B., Swann, Sherlock, Jr., and Snow, R. D. Catalytic Hydration of 

Olefins, Ind. Eng. Chem. 22, 1048. 
Krase, Norman W. New Vapor-Phase Cracking Process for High Compression 

Fuel, Chem. Met. Eng. 37, 624. 
Krase, Norman W. Correlating Theory and Practice in Pressure Vessel Design, 

Chem. Met. Eng. 37, 540. 
Krase, Norman W. High Pressure-High Temperature Technology, Chem. Met. 

Eng. 37, 530. 
Krase, Norman W. and Goodman, J. B. Vapor Pressure of Toluene up to the 

Critical Temperature, Ind. Eng. Chem. 22, 13. 
Krase, Norman W. and Mackey, B. H. The Specific Heats of Gases at High 

Pressures. I. Method and Apparatus at Room Temperature, J.A.C.S. 52, 108. 
Krase, Norman W. and Mackey, B. H. The Specific Heats of Gases at High 

Pressures. II. Method and Apparatus at High Temperatures, J.A.C.S. 52, 

5111. 



Department of Chemistry 105 

Krase, Norman W. and Mackey, B. H. Specific Heats of Gases at High Pres- 
sures. III. Results for Nitrogen to 150° C. and 700 Atmospheres, Ind. Eng. 

Chem. 22, 1060. 
Kremers, H. C. and Quill, L. L. Fractionation of the Rare Earths by Elec- 
trolysis of Aqueous Solutions, Trans. 111. State Acad. Sci. 22, 357. 
Marvel, C. S. and Friedrich, M. E. P. The Reaction Between Alkali Metal 

Alkyls and Quaternary Arsonium Compounds, J.A.C.S. 52, 376. 
Marvel, C. S. and Gillespie, H. B. Symmetrical Dialkyl-Tetra-Tertiary-Butyl- 

ethinylethanes, J.A.C.S. 52, 3368. 
Marvel, C. S., Hussey, S. C, and Hager, F. D. A New Cyclic Azoxy Compound, 

J.A.C.S. 52, 1122. 
Marvel, C. S. and Littmann, E. R. Cyclic Quaternary Ammonium Salts from 

Halogenated Aliphatic Tertiary Amines, J.A.C.S. 52, 287. 
Marvel, C. S. and McMahon, Edward. Mercurated Azo Dyes Derived from 

Benzidine and Ortho-Tolidine, J.A.C.S. 52, 2528. 
Marvel, C. S. and Ozanne, I. L. Hexa-omega-Tertiary-Butylpropinylethane and 

Some New Acetylenic Carbinols, J.A.C.S. 52, 5267. 
Marvel, C. S., Rossander, S. S., and Bock, L. H. Tetracyclohexyldiphenyl- 

ethane, J.A.C.S. 52, 2976. 
Marvel, C. S. and Windus, Wallace. The Reduction of Nicotine and Some 

Derivatives of Hexa- and Octahydronicotines, J.A.C.S. 52, 2543. 
Marvel, C. S. and Windus, Wallace. A Synthesis of Methionine, J.A.C.S. 52, 

2575. 
Neave, S. L. Determination of Chlorides in Salt Brines, Ind. Eng. Chem., Anal. 

Ed. 2, 28. 
Noyes, W. A. The Interaction Between Nitrogen Trichloride and Nitric Oxide 

at —150°. II. Further Evidence for the Formation of Nitrogen Dichloride 

and of Mono-Oxygen-Dinitrogen-Dichloride, J.A.C.S. 52, 4298. 
Noyes, W. A. and Bennett, Chester Wallace. Attempts to Resolve Derivatives 

of Fluorene. Para-Aminobenzophenone Hydrazone, J.A.C.S. 52, 3437. 
Noyes, W. A. and Heubaum, Ulrich. Optically Active Diazo Compounds. 

Diazocamphane, J.A.C.S. 52, 5070. 
Phipps, T. E. and Ginnings, D. C. Temperature-Conductance Curves of Solid 

Salt. III. Halides of Lithium, J.A.C.S. 52, 1340. 
Reedy, J. H. A Reductor Apparatus for Detecting Tin, Ind. Eng. Chem., Anal. 

Ed. 2, 117. 
Reedy, J. H. and Brown, M. H. Determination of Lithium, Ind. Eng. Chem., 

Anal. Ed. 2, 304. 
Reedy, J. H. and Raynolds, J. A. Calcium Perchromate — A New Type of Red 

Perchromate, J.A.C.S. 52, 1851. 
Rodebush, W. H. Third Law of Thermodynamics, Phys. Review 35, 210. 
Rodebush, W. H. and Henry, Wm. F. The Vapor Pressure of Sodium. Low 

Pressure Measurements with the Absolute Manometer, J.A.C.S. 52, 3159. 
Rodebush, W. H. and Nichols, W. A., Jr. Molecular Ray Experiments. The 

Chemical Activity of Molecular and Atomic Oxygen, J.A.C.S. 52, 3864. 
Rodebush, W. H. and Nichols, W. A., Jr. Atomic Oxygen as a Reducing Agent, 

Phys. Review 35, 649. 
Rodebush, W. H. and Nichols, W. A., Jr. An Attempt to Determine Nuclear 

Moments, J.A.C.S. 52, 3024. 
Rodebush, W. H., Shaw, E. J., and Phipps, T. E. Magnetic Moment of Sulfur 

Molecule, Phys. Review 35, 1126. 
Rodebush, W. H. and Troxel, S. M. Heat of Formation of Molecular Oxygen, 

J.A.C.S. 52, 3467. 
Rodebush, W. H. and Walters, Ernest G. The Vapor Pressure and Vapor 

Density of Sodium, J.A.C.S. 52, 2654. 
Rose, Wm. C. and Scull, C. Wesler. Arginine Metabolism. I. The Relation of 

the Arginine Content of the Diet to the Increments in Tissue Arginine Dur- 
ing Growth, J. Biol. Chem. 89, 109. 
Selwood, Pierce W. Deformation of Electric Shells. I. Absorption Spectrum, 

Molecular Volume and Refraction of Neodymium Perchlorate, J.A.C.S. 52, 

3112. 



106 University of Illinois 



Selwood, Pierce W. Deformation of Electron Shells. II. Absorption Spectrum, 
Molecular Volume, and Refraction of Certain Rare Earth Salts, J.A.C.S. 
52, 4308. 

Selwood, Pierce W. Observations on the Rare Earths. XXXIV. Spectro- 
graphic Estimation of Impurities in the Rare Earths, Ind. Eng. Chem., 
Anal. Ed. 2, 93. 

Selwood, Pierce W. A New Line in the Absorption Spectrum of Samarium, 
J.A.C.S. 52, 1937. 

Shriner, R. L. Qualitative Organic Analysis in the Training of the Organic 
Chemist, J. Chem. Ed. 7, 1593. 

Shriner, R. L. and Kurosawa, T. Chalcones. II. Decomposition by Alkali, 
J.A.C.S. 52, 2538. 

Shriner, R. L., Struck, H. C, and Jorison, W. J. The Preparation and Prop- 
erties of Certain Sulfoxides and Sulfones, J.A.C.S. 52, 2060. 

Shriner, R. L. and Turner, T. A. Identification of Nitriles. Preparation of 
Alkyl Phenyl Ketones, J.A.C.S. 52, 1267. 

Shriner, R. L. and Young, J. H. Optically Active Salts of 2-Nitro-Octane, 
J.A.C.S. 52, 3332. 

Smith, G. Frederick. Electrically Heated Sand-Bath Hot Plates for Analytical 
Laboratories, J. Chem. Ed. 7, 1915. 

Smith, G. Frederick and Rich, Joseph. The Use of a Zinc Wire Spiral as a 
Jones Reductor, J. Chem. Ed. 7, 2948. 

Straub, Frederick G. Embrittlement in Boilers, Univ. of 111. Eng. Expt. Sta., 
Bulletin 216. 

Straub, Frederick G. Recent Developments in Embrittlement Research, Power 
Plant Engineering 34, 686. 

Straub, Frederick G. Recent Instances of Embrittlement in Steam Boilers, 
Trans. Am. Soc. Mech. Eng. 52, 339. 

Swann, Sherlock, Jr. The Hydroxylation of Double Bonds, Univ. of 111. Eng. 
Expt. Sta, Bulletin 204. 

Swann, Sherlock, Jr. and Edelmann, E. O. Hydrogen Overvoltages in Glacial 
Acetic Acid, Trans. Am. Electrochem. Soc. 58, 179. 

Villars, Donald Statler. The Photochemical Dissociation of Triatomic Mole- 
cules. Hydrogen Cyanide, J.A.C.S. 52, 61. 

Villars, Donald Statler. The Nature of Activation Heats. A Calculation of 
the Heat of Activation from Band Spectra Data, J.A.C.S. 52, 1733. 

Yntema, L. F. The Separation of Europium by Electrolytic Reduction. Ob- 
servations on the Rare Earths. XXXV, J.A.C.S. 52, 2782. 

Yntema, L. F. and Audrieth, L. F. Acetamide and Formamide as Solvents for 
the Electrodeposition of Metals, J.A.C.S. 52, 2782. 

Yntema, L. F. and Audrieth, L. F. Preliminary Study of the Electrodepo- 
sition of Metals from Liquid Ammonia Solutions of Their Salts, J. Phys. 
Chem. 34, 1903. 

Yntema, L. F. and Ball, Robert W. The Separation of Ytterbium by Electro- 
lytic Reduction. Observations on the Rare Earths. XXXVI, J.A.C.S. 52, 
4264. 

Yntema, L. F. and Peirce, D. D. Electrometric Studies of the Precipitation of 
Columbium and Tantalum and of Molybdenum and Tungsten, J. Phys. 
Chem. 34, 1822. 

1931 

Adams, Roger and Bock, L. H. The Stereochemistry of N-Phenylpyrroles. 
The Preparation and Resolution of N-2-carboxyl-Phenyl-2, 5-Dimethyl-3- 
Carboxypyrrole. XIII, J.A.C.S. 53, 374. 

Adams, Roger and Bock, L. H. Stereochemistry of Phenyl Pyrroles. XIX, 
J.A.C.S. 53, 3519. 

Adams, Roger and Chang, Chin. Stereochemistry of n, n'-Dipyrryls. Resolu- 
tion of N, N\ 2, 5, 2', 5'-Tetramethyl-3, 3'-Dicarboxy-Dipyrryl. XVI, 
J.A.C.S. 53, 2353. 

Adams, Roger and Hill, D. W. Stereochemistry of Phenylquinones. The 
Preparation and Resolution of 2-(3-Bromo-2, 4, 6-Trimethylphenyl)-5- 
Methylbenzo-Quinone-3, 6-Di-( Acetic Acid). XVIII, J.A.C.S. 53, 3453. 



Department of Chemistry 107 

Adams, Roger and Kleiderer, E. C. Stereochemistry of Diphenyl Compounds. 

The Preparation and Resolution of 3, 5, 3', 5'-Tetramethyl-2, 2'-Difluoro-6, 

6'-Diaminodiphenyl. XIV, J.A.C.S. 53, 1575. 
Adams, Roger and Roll, L. J. The Structure of Enol-Acetates and the Cor- 
responding Vinylamines, J.A.C.S. 53, 3469. 
Adams, Roger and Schildneck, P. R. The Synthesis of Polyporic Acid and 

Atromentin Dimethyl Ether, J.A.C.S. 53, 2373. 
Adams, Roger and Schildneck, P. R. Stereochemistry of Diphenylbenzenes. 

Meso and Racemic 2, 5-Di-(3-Bromo-2, 4, 6-Trimethylphenyl)-3, 6-Dibromo- 

hydroquinones and the Corresponding Quinones. XII, J.A.C.S. 53, 343. 
Adams, Roger and Schildneck, P. R. Stereochemistry of Diphenylbenzenes. 

The Cis and Trans Forms of 2, 5-Di-(3-Bromo-2, 4, 6-Trimethyl-Phenyl)-l, 

3, 4, 6-Tetrahydroxybenzenes and the Corresponding Acylates. XV, J.A.C.S. 

53, 2203. 
Adams, Roger and Stanley, W. M. Stereochemistry of Diphenyls. Preparation 

and Properties of 4, 4'-Dicarboxy-l, l'-Dianthraquinoyl. XVII, J.A.C.S. 53, 

2364. 
Audrieth, L. F. A Classification of Compounds of Hydrogen and Nitrogen, 

Trans. 111. State Acad. Sci. 23, 294. 
Audrieth, L. F. and Nelson, H. W. Electrodeposition of Metals from Non- 
Aqueous Solvents, Chem. Reviews 8, 335. 
Audrieth, L. F., Yntema, L. F., and Nelson, H. W. The Electrodeposition of 

Metals from Solutions of Their Salts in Non-Aqueous Solvents, Trans. 111. 

State Acad. Sci. 23, 302. 
Austin, Paul R. Studies of Organic Lead Compounds. I. Action of Acids on 

Lead Aryls, J.A.C.S. 53, 1548. 
Austin, Paul R. Studies of Organic Lead Compounds. II. Oxidation Re- 
actions, J.A.C.S. 53, 3514. 
Bailar, John C, Jr. The Study of Isomerism in Courses in General Chemistry, 

J. Chem. Ed. 8, 310. 
Bailar, John C, Jr. Some Studies in the Pinacol Series, Trans. 111. State Acad. 

Sci. 23, 310. 
Bailar, John C, Jr. Comparison of Solubilities of Calcium and Strontium 

p-Bromobenzoates in Acetone-Water Mixtures, Ind. Eng. Chem., Anal. Ed. 

3, 362. 
Buswell, A. M. The Biology of Activated Sludge — An Historical Review, 

Sewage Works J. 3, 362. 
Buswell, A. M. and Pearson, E. L. Further Observations on Rapid Stage 

Sludge Digestion, Sewage Works J. 3, 210. 
Buswell, A. M. and Pearson, E. L. Acid Sludge Digestion, Ind. Eng. Chem. 

23, 1144. 
Buswell, A. M. and Pearson, E. L. Sludge Ripeness Studies, Ind. Eng. Chem., 

Anal. Ed. 3, 359. 
Buswell, A. M. and Pearson, E. L. Sludge-Digestion Capacity, Ind. Eng. Chem. 

23, 1154. 
Clark, George L. The Contributions of a Quarter Century of Electron Physics 

to Roentgen-Ray Science, Am. J. Roentgenol, and Radium Therapy, 26, 528. 
Clark, George L. X-Rays in the Service of Chemistry and Industry in 1931, 

J. Chem. Ed. 8, 625. 
Clark, George L. The Space Groups and Molecular Symmetry of Optically 

Active Compounds: A Reply, J.A.C.S. 53, 3826. 
Clark, George L. Some Practical Results of X-Ray Researches on Colloids. 

A chapter in "Colloid Chemistry," Vol. Ill, Chemical Catalog Co., New 

York. 
Clark, George L., Andrews, A. I., and Alexander, H. W. Progress Report on 

Determination of Crystalline Compounds Causing Opacity in Enamels by 

X-Ray Methods, J. Am. Ceramic Soc. 14, 634. 
Clark, George L., Bucher, C. S., and Lorenz, Otto. An Extension of X-Ray 

Researches on the Fine Structures of Colloids to Normal and Pathological 

Human Tissues, Radiology 17, 482. 



108 University of Illinois 



Clark, George L. and Corrigan, Kenneth E. Industrial and Chemical Research 

with X-Rays of High Intensity and with Soft X-Rays, Ind. Eng. Chem. 23, 

815. 
Clark, George L. and Fitch, K. R. Chemical Effects of X-Rays Upon Some 

Aromatic Colors and Dyes, Radiology 17, 285. 
Clark, George L. and Pickett, Lucy W. X-Ray Investigations of Optically 

Active Compounds. II. Diphenyl and Some of Its Active and Inactive 

Derivatives, J.A.C.S. 53, 167. 
Clark, George L. and Smith, Howard A. X-Ray Diffraction Study of Fraction- 
ated Paraffin Waxes, Ind. Eng. Chem. 23, 697. 
Clark, George L. and Stillwell, Chas. W. Eine Rontgenographische Studie an 

Chicle, Kautschuk 7, 62. 
Clark, George L. and Stillwell, Chas. W. Further X-Ray Studies of Gutta- 
percha and Balata, Ind. Eng. Chem. 23, 706. 
Du Vigneaud, Vincent, Fitch, Alice, Pekarek, E., and Lockwood, W. W. The 

Inactivation of Crystalline Insulin by Cysteine and Glutathione, J. Biol. 

Chem. 94, 233. 
Du Vigneaud, Vincent and Hollander, Lenore. The Resolution of Inactive 

Cystine and Isolation of Pure Dextrorotatory Cystine, J. Biol. Chem. 94, 243. 
Englis, D. T. and Dykins, F. A. The Effect of Ethylene Upon the Hydrolysis 

of Salicin by Emulsin, J.A.C.S. 53, 723. 
Englis, D. T. and Dykins, F. A. Determination of Glucose in Presence of 

Fructrose and Glycine by Iodometric Method, Ind. Eng. Chem., Anal. Ed. 3, 

21. 
Englis, D. T. and Foreman, E. Leon. Isolation and Identification of a Poly- 
saccharide from Southern Yellow Pine, Ind. Eng. Chem. 23, 415. 
Englis, D. T. and Kleiderer, E. C. Hydrolysis of Inulin Under Pressure, Ind. 

Eng. Chem. 23, 332. 
Englis, D. T., Pfeifer, G. T., and Gabby, J. L. The Polarimetric Reducing 

Sugar Relationships of Starch Hydrolytic Products Resulting from Diastatic 

Action, J.A.C.S. 53, 1883. 
Englis, D. T. and Sekera, V. C. The Effect of Water Blanching on the 

Canning of Whole Kernel Corn. I. The Change in Toughness of the Hull, 

Canner 20, 11. 
Englis, D. T. and Gabby, J. L. The Effect of Water Blanching on the Canning 

of Whole Kernel Corn. II. The Loss in the Washing of the Cut Corn, 

Canner 20, 17. 
Fuson, R. C. and Beveridge, Reid G. Dihalocyanoacetyl Derivatives of Mesity- 

lene, J.A.C.S. 53, 1985. 
Fuson, R. C, Farlow, Mark W., and Stehman, Carlyle J. The Haloform 

Reaction. IV. The Influence of ortho-Methoxy Groups, J.A.C.S. 53, 4097. 
Fuson, R. C, Gray, Arzy R., and Walker, Joseph T. The Haloform Reaction. 

III. Trihaloacetyl Derivatives of Mesitylene, Durene and Isodurene, J.A.C.S. 

53, 3494. 
Fuson, R. C, Kuykendall, Sidney B., and Wilhelm, Geo. W. Dihydro-1, 

4-Pyrans. I. The Action of Sodium Cyanide on 1, 4-Dibromo-l, 4-Diaroyl- 

butanes, J.A.C.S. 53, 4187. 
Hopkins, B S. Untangling One of Nature's Puzzles, Proc. Am. Philosoph. Soc. 

70, 207. 
Hopkins, B S., Audrieth, L. F., Jukkola, E. E., and Meints, R. E. Observa- 
tions on the Rare Earths. XXXVII. Electrolytic Preparation of Rare Earth 

Amalgams. (1) Preparation of Amalgams of Lanthanum and Neodymium, 

J.A.C.S. 53, 1805. 
Johnstone, H. F. Metallic Ions as Catalysts for the Removal of Sulfur Dioxide 

From Boiler Furnace Gases, Ind. Eng. Chem. 23, 559. 
Johnstone, H. F. Reactions of Sulfur Compounds in Boiler Furnaces, Ind. Eng. 

Chem. 23, 620. 
Johnstone, H. F. The Corrosion of Power Plant Equipment by Flue Gases, 

Univ. of 111. Eng. Expt. Sta., Bulletin 228. 
Johnstone, H. F. The Elimination of Sulphur Compounds From Boiler Furnace 

Gases, Paper for Presentation at 3rd Internat. Conference on Bituminous 

Coal, Pittsburgh, Pa., Nov. 16-21. 



Department of Chemistry 109 

Keyes, D. B. Distillation Advances in Column Design, Chem. Met. Eng. 38, 4. 
Keyes, D. B. and Faith, W. Lawrence. Catalytic Partial Oxidation of Alcohols 

in the Vapor Phase. Ill, Ind. Eng. Chem. 23, 1250. 
Keyes, D. B. and Snow, R. D. Studies in Liquid Partial Oxidation. II, Ind. 

Eng. Chem. 23, 561. 
Klabunde, Harriette King. Note on the Preparation of Hydroxyproline, J. Biol. 

Chem. 90, 293. 
Krase, Norman W. and Dewey, Milton A. Hydrolysis of Starch by Carbonic 

Acid, Ind. Eng. Chem. 23, 1436. 
Krase, Norman W. and Goodman, John B. Solubility of Nitrogen in Water at 

High Pressures and Temperatures, Ind. Eng. Chem. 23, 401. 
Marvel, C. S. and Chu, Tse-Tsing. Synthesis and Characterization of 2, 4-di- 

methylpentanol-1, J.A.C.S. 53, 4449. 
Marvel, C. S. and Davis, D. W. The Stability of Hexa-Tertiary-Alkyleth- 

inylethanes. The Effect of Increasing the Weight of the Alkyl Groups, 

J.A.C.S. 53, 3840. 
Marvel, C. S. and Griffith, Esther. The Structure of the Compounds Pro- 
duced by the Addition of Mercuric Salts to Olefins. II, J.A.C.S. 53, 789. 
Marvel, C. S. and Stampfli, J. Gail. Tetraphenyl-Di-Tertiary-Butylethiny- 

lethane, J.A.C.S. 53, 4057. 
Marvel, C. S. and Windus, Wallace. The Resolution of Synthetic Methionine, 

J.A.C.S. 53, 3490. 
Noyes, W. A. The Interaction Between Nitrogen Trichloride and Nitric Oxide 

at —150°. III. Interaction of Nitric Oxide and Chlorine at —80 and at 

—150°, J.A.C.S. 53, 2137. 
Noyes, W. A. Oxydation und Reduktion als Elektronenvorgange, Angewandte 

Chemie 44, 893. 
Noyes, W. A. Die Elektronenstruktur Des Stickdioxyd, Zeit. Elektrochemie 37, 

569. 
Noyes, W. A. and Norris, James F. Biographical Memoir of Ira Remsen, 

1846-1927, Nat. Acad. Sci. 14, 207. 
Phipps, T. E. and Stern, O. Uber die Einstellung der Richtungsquantelung, 

Zeit. Physik 73, 185. 
Quill, L. L. Reactions of Boron Trichloride, Trans. 111. State Acad. Sci. 23, 333. 
Quill, L. L. and Selwood, Pierce W. Recent Advances in Rare Earth Chem- 
istry, Trans. 111. State Acad. Sci. 23, 339. 
Reedy, J. H. The Mode of Oxidation of Organic Acids, Trans. 111. State Acad. 

Sci. 24, 262. 
Rodebush, W. H. The Entropy of Hydrogen, Phys. Review 37, 221. 
Rodebush, W. H. The Superposition of Electron Charges in Molecules and 

alpha-Particles, J.A.C.S. 53, 1611. 
Rodebush, W. H. The Calculation of Chemical Equilibrium From Spectroscopic 

Data, Chem. Reviews 9, 319. 
Rodebush, W. H. Molecular Rays, Reviews Mod. Phys. 3, 392. 
Rodebush, W. H. and DeVries, John. The Dipole Moment of Semi-Polar 

Bonds, J.A.C.S. 53, 2888. 
Rose, Wm. C. Dietary Facts and Fads, Ind. Eng. Chem. 23, 711. 
Rose, Wm. C. Feeding Experiments with Mixtures of Highly Purified Amino 

Acids. I. The Inadequacy of Diets Containing Nineteen Amino Acids, 

J. Biol. Chem. 94, 155. 
Rose, Wm. C. and Ellis, Ruth H. Feeding Experiments with Mixtures of 

Highly Purified Amino Acids. II. The Supplementing Effect of Proteins, 

J. Biol. Chem. 94, 167. 
Rose, Wm. C, Windus, Wallace, and Catherwood, Florence L. Feeding Ex- 
periments with Mixtures of Highly Purified Amino Acids. III. The Sup- 
plementing Effect of Casein Fractions, J. Biol. Chem. 94, 173. 
Shriner, R. L. and Cox, Richard, F. B. Identification of Alcohols. Para- 

Nitrophenyl Urethans, J.A.C.S. 53, 1601. 
Shriner, R. L., Cox, Richard F. B., and Eckler, C. R. The Antipyretic Action 

of para-Acetylaminophenylurethans, J.A.C.S. 53, 3498. 
Shriner, R. L. and Horne, W. H. Correction. para-Nitrophenyl Carbamyl 

Chloride and para-Nitrophenyl Isocyanate, J.A.C.S. 53, 3186. 



110 University of Illinois 



Shriner, R. L. and Sohl, W. E. The Thermal Conversion of Ethyl (1-Pyrryl)- 

Acetate to Pyridine, J.A.C.S. 53, 4168. 
Smith, G. Frederick and Bliss, H. H. The Use of Bromate in Volumetric 

Analysis. V. Internal Indicators Suitable for Use in Direct Titrations, 

J.A.C.S. 53, 2091. 
Smith, G. Frederick and Bliss, H. H. The Use of Bromate in Volumetric 

Analysis. VI. The Determination of Iron Using Basic Mercuric Bromate, 

J.A.C.S. 53, 4291. 
Smith, G. Frederick and Goehler, O. E. Purification of Perchloric Acid by 

Vacuum Distillation, Ind. Eng. Chem., Anal. Ed. 3, 48. 
Smith, G. Frederick and Goehler, O. E. Oxonium Structure of Hydrated 

Perchloric Acid, Ind. Eng. Chem., Anal. Ed. 3, 58. 
Smith, G. Frederick and Goehler, O. E. Oxonium Perchlorate as Reference 

Standard for Construction of Specific Gravity-Percentage Composition 

Table for Strong Perchloric Acid Solutions, Ind. Eng. Chem., Anal. Ed. 

5,61. 
Smith, G. Frederick and Goehler, O. E. Dissociation of Concentrated 

Perchloric Acid During Vacuum Distillation at Moderately Low Pressures, 

Ind. Eng. Chem., Anal. Ed. 3, 55. 
Smith, G. Frederick and Hardy, V. R. A Design of Experimental Vacuum 

Oven for Temperatures Less Than 300 Degrees Centigrade, J. Chem. Ed. 8, 

548. 
Smith, G. Frederick and Koch, W. W. Perchloric Acid as a New Standard 

in Acidimetry, Ind. Eng. Chem., Anal. Ed. 3, 52. 
Smith, G. Frederick and Rees, O. W. Design and Construction of Special 

Vacuum-Drying Apparatus for Dehydration of Products with Low Vapor 

Pressure, Ind. Eng. Chem. 23, 1328. 
Smith, G. Frederick and Shead, A. C. Lithium Chloroplatinate and the Sepa- 
ration of Potassium From Sodium and Lithium by the Unmodified Original 

Fresenius Method, J.A.C.S. 53, 947. 
Smith, G. Frederick and Shead, A. C. The Decomposition of Refractory 

Silicates by Fused Ammonium Fluoride and Its Application to the Determi- 
nation of Silica in Glass Sands, J.A.C.S. 53, 483. 
Stanley, W. M. Stereochemistry of Diphenyl Compounds. The Resolution of 

8, 8'-Dicarboxy-l, l'-Dinaphthyl, J.A.C.S. 53, 3104. 
Steele, Catherine Cassels. The alpha, alpha'-Dimethylsuberic and alpha, alpha'- 

Dibromo-alpha, alpha'-Dimethylsuberic Acids, J.A.C.S. 53, 283. 
Stillwell, Chas. W. The Crystal Structures of Electrodeposited Alloys. Silver- 
Cadmium, J.A.C.S. 53, 2416. 
Stillwell, Chas. W. An X-Ray Diffraction Study of Chicle, Ind. Eng. Chem. 

23, 703. 
Stillwell, Chas. W. An Industrial Chemical Text of 1830. A Review, J. Chem. 

Ed. 8, 896. 
Swann, Sherlock, Jr. and Xanthakos, Theodore S. Cobaltic Sulfate as an 

Oxidizing Agent, J.A.C.S. 53, 400. 

1932 

Adams, Roger and Becker, B. C. Stereochemistry of Diphenyl. XXIV. Prepa- 
ration and Properties of 2, 2'-Difluoro-3, 3'-Dicarboxy-6, 6'-Dimethoxydi- 
phenyl, J.A.C.S. 54, 2973. 

Adams, Roger and Coleman, Gerald H. The Preparation of Various omega- 
Cyclohexyl Alkyl Amines and Their Bactericidal Action to Mycobacterium 
Leprae. XXII, J.A.C.S. 54, 1982. 

Adams, Roger, Johnson, E. H., and Weinmayr, V. Substitution Products of 
Alpha-Naphthoyl-Ortho-Benzoic Acid, J.A.C.S. 54, 3289. 

Adams, Roger and Roll, L. J. The Stereochemistry of Carbodiimides. XXII, 
J.A.C.S. 54, 2494. 

Adams, Roger and Stanley, W. M. The Surface Tension of Various Aliphatic 
Acids Previously Studied for Bactericidal Action to Mycobacterium Leprae. 
XX, J.A.C.S. 54, 1548. 



Department of Chemistry 111 

Adams, Roger, Stanley, W. M., Coleman, G. H., Greer, C. M., and Sacks, J. 

Bacteriological Action of Certain Synthetic Organic Acids Toward Myco- 
bacterium Leprae and Other Acid-Fast Bacteria. XXI, J. Pharmacol, and 

Expt. Therapeutics 45, 121. 
Adams, Roger and Stoughton, R. W. Stereochemistry of Diphenyls. XXV. 

The Relative Interfering Effects of the Groups F, OCH 3 , CI, Br as 

Determined by the Relative Rates of Racemization of the 2'-Substituted 

2-Nitro-6-Carboxydiphenyls, J.A.C.S. 54, 4426. 
Adams, Roger and White, Julius. Stereochemistry of Diphenyl. XXI. Resolu- 
tion of 2, 4, 6, 2', 4', 6'-Hexachloro-3, 3'-Dicarboxydiphenyl, J.A.C.S. 54, 2104. 
Adams, Roger and Woodruff, E. H. Stereochemistry of Dipyridyls. Preparation 

and Resolution of 2, 4, 2', 4'-Tetracarboxy-6, 6'-Diphenyl-3, 3'-Dipyridyl. XX, 

J.A.C.S. 54, 1977. 
Adams, Roger and Yuan, H. C. Stereochemistry of Diphenyl. XXIII. Optically 

Active 2, 5-Dimethoxy-2'-Nitro-6'-Carboxydiphenyl and the Mutarotation of 

Its Salts, J.A.C.S. 54, 2966. 
Adams, Roger and Yuan, H. C. Stereochemistry of Diphenyls. XXVI. The 

Effect of Substitution on the Rate of Racemization of Certain Optically 

Active Diphenyls, J.A.C.S. 54, 4434. 
Audrieth, L. F. Reaktionen in flussigem Ammoniak, Angewandte Chemie 45, 

385. 
Audrieth, L. F. and Stillwell, Chas. W. Glacial Acetic Acid as a Solvent for 

the Electrodeposition of Metals. An X-Ray Diffraction Study of the Struc- 
ture of Deposits of Arsenic, Antimony, and Bismuth, J.A.C.S. 54, 472. 
Audrieth, L. F., Walden, P., and Birr, E. J. Leitfahigkeitsmessungen in 

Pyridin, Zeit. physikal. Chem. 160, 337. 
Austin, Paul R. Studies of Organic Lead Compounds. III. The Reaction of 

Organic Lead Salts on Mercury and Lead Aryls, J.A.C.S. 54, 3287. 
Austin, Paul R. Studies of Organic Lead Compounds. IV. The Use of 

Lithium Derivatives in the Synthesis of Lead Aryls. The Preparation of 

Amino Compounds, J.A.C.S. 54, 3726. 
Boruff, C. S. and Stoll, K. E. Intermittent Chlorination of Condenser Water, 

Ind. Eng. Chem. 24, 398. 
Buswell, A. M. and Althausen, Darrell. "Bound Water" — Changes During 

Sludge Digestion, Sewage Works J. 4, 28. 
Buswell, A. M. and Boruff, C. S. The Relation Between the Chemical Compo- 
sition of Organic Matter and the Quality and Quantity of Gas Produced 

During Sludge Digestion, Sewage Works J. 4, 454. 
Buswell, A. M. and Boruff, C. S. The Anaerobic Stabilization of Sewage 

Screenings, Sewage Works J. 4, 973. 
Buswell, A. M. and Boruff, C. S. Power and Fuel Gas From Distillery Wastes, 

Ind. Eng. Chem. 24, 33. 
Buswell, A. M., Boruff, C. S., and Wiesman, C. K. Anaerobic Stabilization of 

Milk Waste, Ind. Eng. Chem. 24, 1423. 
Buswell, A. M. and Hudson, H. W Soap Consumption and Water Quality, 

J. Am. Water Works Assoc. 24, 859. 
Buswell, A. M. and Symons, G. E. Preparation and Biochemical Oxygen 

Demand of Pure Sodium Soaps, Ind. Eng. Chem. 24, 460. 
Clark, George L. X-Rays as a Research Tool in Chemistry and Industry, Ind. 

Eng. Chem. 24, 182. 
Clark, George L. Translation — The Concept of Dosage and the Definition of the 

r-unit (Roentgen Unit) by Glocker, (Dr. Richard), Radiology 18, 93. 
Clark, George L. Bemerkung zu der Arbeit : "The Lattice Dimensions of 

Spinels," Zeit. physikal. Chem. 17, 463. 
Clark, George L. and Ally, Abde. X-Ray Examination of Chrome Ores: 

I. Lattice Dimensions ; II. Theoretical Densities, Am. Mineralogist 17, 66. 
Clark, George L., Ally, Abde, and Badger, A. E. The Lattice Dimensions of 

Spinels, Am. J. Sci. 22, 539. 
Clark, George L. and Corrigan, K. E. The Crystal Structure of Insulin, Phys. 

Review 40, 639. 



112 University of Illinois 



Clark, George L. and Farr, Wanda K. Cotton Fibers. II. Structural Features 
of the Wall Suggested by X-Ray Diffraction Analyses and Observations in 
Ordinary and Plane-Polarized Light, Contrib. Boyce-Thompson Inst. 4, 273. 

Du Vigneaud, Vincent and Butz, Lewis W. The Formation of a Homologue 
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Du Vigneaud, Vincent, Dorfmann, Ralph, and Loring, Hubert S. A Com- 
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Du Vigneaud, Vincent and Meyer, Curtis E. The Temporary Formation of the 
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Keyes, D. B. Esterification Processes and Equipment, Ind. Eng. Chem. 24. 1096. 

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Koelsch, C. Frederick. Triphenylvinylmagnesium Bromide, J.A.C.S. 54, 2045. 

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Marvel, C. S. and Althausen, D. The Rearrangement of Certain Polyines. 
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Marvel, C. S. and Munro, H. E. Rearrangements of Polyines. II. Tetra- 
phenyldiphenylethinylethane, J.A.C.S. 54, 4445. 



Department of Chemistry 113 

Marvel, C. S. and Sweet, R. S. The Reduction of Acetylenic Carbinols with 

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Review 39, 386. 
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Eng. Chem. 24, 1174. 



114 University of Illinois 



Straub, Frederick G. and Larson, Reinhold F. Decomposition of Dilute 
Sodium Carbonate Solutions at Temperatures Between 147° and 243° C, Ind. 
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Swann, Sherlock, Jr. The Electrolytic Reduction of Aliphatic Ketones to 
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1933 

Adams, Roger and Kleiderer, E. C. Stereochemistry of Diphenyl. XXVIII. 
Preparation and Properties of 2, 2'-Difluoro-3, 3'-dicarboxy-5, 5'-dimethyl-6, 
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Adams, Roger and Kleiderer, E. C. Stereochemistry of Diphenyls. XXXI. 
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Adams, Roger and Knauf, A. E. Stereochemistry of Diphenyls. XXXIV. 
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Adams, Roger and Maclean, Marion E. Diastereoisomers of 2, 5-Diphenyl- 
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Adams, Roger and Maclean, Marion E. Study of Certain Analogs of Resolv- 
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Adams, Roger and Patterson, W. I. Stereochemistry of N-Phenylpyrroles. 
XXIX. Preparation and Properties of o-N-Carbazyl- and o-N-(3-Nitro- 
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Adams, Roger and Searle, N. E. Stereochemistry of Diphenyls. XXX. Prepara- 
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Adams, Roger, Stanley, W. M., and McMahon, Edward. Stereochemistry of 
Diphenyls. XXVII. Comparison of the Racemization of 2, 2'-Difluoro-6, 6'- 
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Adams, Roger, Van Arendonk, A. M., and Becker, B. C. Stereochemistry of 
Diphenyls. XXXIII. Preparation and Properties of 2, 3'-Dinitro-6-carboxy- 
2', 6'-dimethoxydiphenyl and 2-nitro-6-carboxy-2'-fluoro-6'-methoxydiphenyl, 
J.A.C.S. 55, 4230. 

Adams, Roger, Van Arendonk, A. M., and Cupery, M. E. Stereochemistry of 
Diphenyls. XXXII. Preparation and Properties of Certain 2, 2' , 6, 6'-Tetra- 
methoxydiphenyls, J.A.C.S. 55, 4225. 

Adams, Roger and Yuan, H. C. The Stereochemistry of Diphenyls and An- 
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Audrieth, L. F. Uber Solvosysteme Chemischer Verbindungen, Zeit. physikal. 
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Audrieth, L. F. and Birr, E. J. Anomalous Electrolytes. I. The Electrical 
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Audrieth, L. F., Nespital, W., and Ulich, H. Electric Moments of Hydrazine 
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Austin, Paul R. Studies of Organic Lead Compounds. V. Asymmetric- 
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Buswell, A. M. and Althausen, D. Sludge Ripeness Studies. II. The Effect of 
Pressure on Digested and Chemically Treated Sludges, Sewage Works J. 
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Department of Chemistry 115 

Buswell, A. M., Althausen, D., Boruff, C. S., and Symons, G. E. Comments 
on Fair and Moore's Articles on "Heat and Energy Relations in the Diges- 
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Buswell, A. M. and Boruff, C. S. Mechanical Equipment for Continuous Fer- 
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Fuson, R. C. and Babcock, S. H. The Cleavage of Carbonyl Compounds by 
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Fuson, R. C. and Bull, Benton A. The Cleavage of Carbonyl Compounds by 
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Fuson, R. C. and Ellingboe, Ellsworth. The Coupling Action of the Grignard 
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Fuson, R. C, Hoffman, Arnold, and Farlow, Mark W. Ring-Chain Conjuga- 
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Fuson, R. C, Kozacik, A. P., and Eaton, J. T. The Reversible Addition of 
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Fuson, R. C. and Ross, Wm. E. The Coupling Action of the Grignard Reagent. 
IV. Benzal Chloride and Benzotrichloride, J.A.C.S. 55, 720. 

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Hopkins, B S. and Hughes, Gordon. Observations on the Rare Earths. XXXIX. 
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Hopkins, B S. and Hughes, Gordon. Observations on the Rare Earths. 
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Hopkins, B S., Meints, R. E., and Audrieth, L. F. Beobachtungen an den 
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Hopkins, B S. and Naeser, Chas. R. Microabsorption Spectra, Ind. Eng. Chem., 
Anal. Ed. 5, 358. 

Hopkins, B S. and Quill, L. L. The Use of Non-Aqueous Solvents in the 
Study of the Rare Earth Group, Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. 19, 64. 



116 University of Illinois 



Hopkins, B S. and Sherwood, G. R. Observations on the Rare Earths. 

XXXIII. Studies in Basicity, J.A.C.S. 55, 3117. 
Hughes, Gordon and Pearce, D. W. Observations on the Rare Earths. XL. 

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Krase, Norman W. and Holloway, Judson B. Synthesis of Benzaldehyde from 

Benzene and Carbon Monoxide Under Pressure, Ind. Eng. Chem. 25, 497. 
Marvel, C. S. and Blomquist, A. T. Reactions of some Substituted Divinyl- 

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Marvel, C. S. and Chu, Tse-Tsing. A Proof of the Unsymmetrical Structure 

of the Azoxy Group, J.A.C.S. 55, 2841. 
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Trialkylethinylcarbinols, J.A.C.S. 55, 2841. 
Marvel, C. S., Gibbs, C. F., and Littmann, E. R. Quaternary Ammonium 

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Marvel, C. S. and Goebel, M. T. Rearrangements of the Polyines. V. Reactions 

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Marvel, C. S., Lehman, M. R., and Thompson, C. D. Quaternary Ammonium 

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Marvel, C. S. and Mitchell, D. T. Cyclization of Substituted Divinylacetylenes, 

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Marvel, C. S. and Tsao, June Chien-Yu. Rearrangements of Polyines. VI. 

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XXXIX. The Transference Numbers of the Chlorides of Neodymium, 

Samarium and Gadolinium. Part II. Measurement of the Transference 

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Rodebush, W H. and Klingelhoefer, W. C, Jr. Atomic Chlorine and Its 

Reaction with Hydrogen, J.A.C.S. 55, 130. 



Department of Chemistry 117 

Rodebush, W. H. and Wahl, M. H. A New Band in the Water Vapor Dis- 
charge, J.A.C.S. 55, 1742. 

Rodebush, W. H. and Wahl, M. H. The Reactions of the Hydroxyl Radical 
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Rose, Wm. C. The Role of Proteins in Metabolism, Ohio J. Sci. 33, 372. 

Rose, Wm. C. The Metabolism of Creatine and Creatinine, Ann. Review of 
Biochem. 2, 187. 

Rose, Wm. C. and Meyer, Curtis E. Arginine Metabolism. II. The Relation of 
the Arginine Content of the Diet to the Creatine-Creatinine Production Dur- 
ing Growth, J. Biol. Chem. 102, 461. 

Sekera, Vladimir C. Aryl />-Bromobenzenesulfonates as Derivatives for the 
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Shriner, R. L. and Conard, Vera A. Aminoguanidine Derivatives, J.A.C.S. 55, 
2867. 

Shriner, R. L., Fulton, J. M., and Burks, Dana, Jr. The Ternary System: 
Palmitic, Margaric and Stearic Acids, J.A.C.S. 55, 1494. 

Shriner, R. L. and Horne, W. H. Asymmetric Syntheses. III. The Action of 
Optically Active Nitrates on a-Tetralone, J.A.C.S. 55, 4652. 

Shriner, R. L. and Horne, W. H. The Local Anesthetic Action of p-Amino- 
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Shriner, R. L., Horne, W. H., and Cox, R. F. B. Para-Aminophenyl Urethans 
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Shriner, R. L. and Parker, E. A. Asymmetric Syntheses. II. The Action of 
Optically Active Nitrates on Cyclic Ketones, J.A.C.S. 55, 766. 

Shriner, R. L. and Sohl, W. E. The Structure of Cuscohygrine. Synthesis of 
Ethyl Homohygrinate, J.A.C.S. 55, 3828. 

Shriner, R. L. and Stutz, R. E. The Preparation and Properties of Methylene 
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Shriner, R. L. and Teeters, W. O. A New Preparation of Ninhydrin, J.A.C.S. 
55, 3026. 

Smith, G. Frederick and Gring, J. L. The Separation and Determination of the 
Alkali Metals Using Perchloric Acid. V. Perchloric Acid and Chloro- 
platinic Acid in the Determination of Small Amounts of Potassium in the 
Presence of Large Amounts of Sodium, J.A.C.S. 55, 3957. 

Smith, G. Frederick and Hardy, V. R. Rapid Preparation of Anhydrous 
Na 2 C0 3 for Use in Acidimetry. Dissociation and Dehydration of NaHC0 3 
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Stillwell, Chas. W. The X-Ray Analysis of Electro-deposited Alloys, Metal 
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Stillwell, Chas. W. and Feinberg, Henry I. The Structure of Electro- 
deposited Alloys. II. The Effect of Current Density and Temperature of 
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Stillwell, Chas. W. and Robinson, Walter K. Sodium-Lead Alloys. The 
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Swann, Sherlock, Jr. The Influence of Iron Salts on the Electrolytic Reduction 
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Swann, Sherlock, Jr. The Electrolytic Reduction of Ketones in Glacial Acetic 
Acid. I. Reduction of Aromatic Ketones, Trans. Electrochem. Soc. 64, 245. 

1934 

Adams, Roger and Chang, Chin. Stereochemistry of Diphenyls. XXXVI. 

Preparation and Resolution of Certain Substituted Dipyrrylbenzenes, 

J.A.C.S. 56, 2089. 
Adams, Roger and Chien, S. L. Stereochemistry of Diphenyls. XXXV. The 

Effect of 3' Substituents on the Rate of Racemization of 2-Nitro-6-carboxy- 

2'-methoxydiphenyl, J.A.C.S. 56, 1787. 
Adams, Roger, Hanford, W. E., and Liang, Poe. The Constitution of Vasicine, 

J.A.C.S. 56, 2780. 



118 University of Illinois 



Adams, Roger, Knauf, A. E., and Shildneck, P. R. Stereochemistry of 

Diphenyls. XXXVII. The Resolution of Certain Substituted Diphenyl- 

benzenes, J.A.C.S. 56, 2109. 
Adams, Roger and Holmes, D. F. The Use of /-Methoxyacetyl Chloride for the 

Resolution of Amino Acids, J.A.C.S. 56, 2093. 
Adams, Roger and Searle, N. E. Stereochemistry of Diphenyls. XXXVIII. 

Resolution of 2, 2'-Dibromo-4, 4'-dicarboxydiphenyl, J.A.C.S. 56, 2112. 
Audrieth, L. F. Hydrazoic Acid and Its Inorganic Derivatives, Chem. Reviews 

15, 169. 
Audrieth, L. F. and Schmidt, M. T. Fused "Onium" Salts as Acids. I. Re- 
actions in Fused Ammonium Nitrate, Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. 20, 221. 
Bailar, John C, Jr. The Preparation of Anhydrous Ethylenediamine, J.A.C.S. 

56, 955. 
Bailar, John C, Jr. and Auten, Robert W. The Stereochemistry of Complex 

Inorganic Compounds. I. The Walden Inversion as Exhibited by Diethyl- 

enediaminocobaltic Compounds, J.A.C.S. 56, 774. 
Boruff, C. S. Removal of Fluorides from Drinking Waters, Ind. Eng. Chem. 

26, 69. 
Buswell, A. M. and Boruff, C. S. The Anaerobic Fermentation of Lignin, 

J.A.C.S. 56, 886. 
Buswell, A. M., Larson, T. E., and Boruff, C. S. A Carbon Study of Sludge 

Digestion, Sewage Works J. 6, 24. 
Buswell, A. M. and Tarvin, D. The Methane Fermentation of Organic Acids 

and Carbohydrates, J.A.C.S. 56, 1751. 
Clark, George L. The Effects of X-Radiation on Cell Structure and Growth, 

Collecting Net 9, 165, 208. 
Clark, George L. X-Ray Research in the Glass Industry, Ceramic Ind. 23, 324. 
Clark, George L. Principles of Crystal Growth, Cold Spring Harbor Symposia 

on Quantitative Biology 2, 6. 
Clark, George L. The Macromolecule and the Micelle as Structural Units in 

Biological Materials, with Special Reference to Cellulose, Cold Spring 

Harbor Symposia on Quantitative Biology 2, 28. 
Clark, George L. The Effects of X-Radiation on Cell Growth and Structure, 

Cold Spring Harbor Symposia on Quantitative Biology 2, 249. 
Clark, George L. The Significant Role of the Atom in Cancer Therapy, Nature 

134, 791. 
Clark, George L. X-Ray Diffraction Studies of the Bureau of Standards Rub- 
ber Fractions, Science 79, 433. 
Clark, George L., Flege, R. K., and Ziegler, P. F. Surgical Catgut Ligatures. 

X-Ray Diffraction Studies, Ind. Eng. Chem. 26, 440. 
Clark, George L., Howe, E. E., and Badger, A. E. Lattice Dimensions of Some 

Solid Solutions in the System MgO-Al 2 3 , J. Am. Ceramic Soc. 17, 7. 
Clark, George L. and Mrgudich, J. N. An X-Ray Diffraction Study of the 

Effect of Rachitis Upon the Structural Characteristics of Bone, Am. J. 

Physiol. 108, 74. 
Clark, George L. and Mrgudich, J. N. X-Rays Reveal Successive Steps in 

Cable Oil Deterioration, Electrical World 103, 284. 
Clark, George L., Schmitt, Francis O., and Mrgudich, J. N. X-Ray Diffraction 

Studies on Nerve, Science 80, 567. 
Clark, George L. and Sisson, Wayne A. Fluting in Annealed Sheet Steel and 

Its Elimination, Metals and Alloys 5, 103. 
Clark, George L. and Southard, Julia. Sorption on Cotton Fibers of Dyes 

with Varying Molecular Association in Solution, Physics 5, 95. 
Clark, George L., Tuckey, S. L., and Ruehe, H. A. The Application of X-Rays 

to Research in Dairy Technology, J. Dairy Science 17, 587. 
Clark, George L. and Werner, Charles O. The Crystal Structure of the 

Silver Nitrate-Urea Addition Compound. I. Space Group and Molecular 

Association, Zeit. Kristallographie (A) 88, 162. 
Clark, George L. and Ziegler, Paul F. The X-Ray in the Study of the Catgut 

Ligature, Surgery, Gynecology and Obstetrics 58, 578. 



Department of Chemistry 119 

Englis, D. T. and Dykins, F. A. Sirup from Jerusalem Artichokes, Trans. 111. 

State Acad. Sci. 26, 39. 
Fuson, R. C. and Bull, Benton A. Trihalomethylketonic Acids of the Naph- 
thalene Series, J.A.C.S. 56, 736. 
Fuson, R. C, Davis, M. E., Wojcik, B. H., and Turck, J. A. V. Dihydro-1, 

4-pyrans. IV. The Synthesis of Gamma-Benzoyl-Gamma-butyrolactone and 

Alpha-Hydroxy-Delta-benzoylvaleric Acid, J.A.C.S. 56, 235. 
Fuson, R. C, Eaton, J. T., and Black, D. B. The Reversible Addition of 

Aromatic Compounds to Benzalacetophenones, J.A.C.S. 56, 687. 
Fuson, R. C. and Ellingboe, Ellsworth. The 1, 2-Dibenzoylcyclobutanes, 

J.A.C.S. 56, 1774. 
Fuson, R. C. and Ellingboe, Ellsworth. The Action of Phenylmagnesium 

Bromide on the Anhydride and the Phenylimide of 1, 2-Cyclobutane- 

dicarboxylic Acid, J.A.C.S. 56, 1777. 
Fuson, R. C. and Farlow, Mark W. The Action of Zinc on 1, 4-Dibromo-l, 

4-dibenzoylbutane. An Intramolecular Reformatsky Reaction, J.A.C.S. 56, 

1593. 
Fuson, R. C. and Gray, Arzy R. The Highly Activated Carbonyl Group. 

Dimesityl Tetraketone, J.A.C.S. 56, 1367. 
Fuson, R. C. and Gray, Arzy R. The Highly Activated Carbonyl Group. 

Mesitylglyoxal, J.A.C.S. 56, 739. 
Fuson, R. C. and Johnson, Robert. The Haloform Reaction. XIII. Trihalo- 
methylketonic Acids of the Mesitylene Series, J.A.C.S. 56, 1417. 
Fuson, R. C, Matuszeski, J. F., and Gray, Arzy R. The Highly Activated 

Carbonyl Group: Dimesityl Triketone, J.A.C.S. 56, 2099. 
Fuson, R. C. and Tullock, Charles W. The Haloform Reaction. XIV. An 

Improved Iodoform Test, J.A.C.S. 56, 1638. 
Fuson, R. C. and Weinstock, Harry H., Jr. The Reversibility of the Friedel- 

Crafts Reactions. The Interconversion of a-(Benzohydryl)-pinacolones, 

J.A.C.S. 56, 1241. 
Fuson, R. C, Woodward, C. F., and Borcherdt, Gerald T. The Reversibility 

of the Friedel-Crafts Condensation. The Benzal- and Dibenzalacetones, 

J.A.C.S. 56, 2103. 
Hopkins, B S. Europium, A Rare Member of the Rare Earth Group, Trans. 

Am. Electrochem. Soc. 46, 49. 
Hopkins, B S. ancl Audrieth, L. F. The Electrolysis of Rare Earth Metal 

Salts in Non-Aqueous Solvents, Trans. Am. Electrochem. Soc. 46, 135. 
Hopkins, B S., Jukkola, E. E., and Audrieth, L. F. Observations on the Rare 

Earths. XLI. Electrolytic Preparation of Rare Earth Amalgams. 3. 

Amalgams of Lanthanum, Neodymium, Cerium, Samarium, and Yttrium. 

Metallic Lanthanum, Neodymium and Cerium by Thermal Decomposition 

of Their Amalgams, J.A.C.S. 56, 303. 
Johnstone, H. F. and Leppla, P. W. The Solubility of Sulfur Dioxide at Low 

Partial Pressures. The Ionization Constant and Heat of Ionization of 

Sulfurous Acid, J.A.C.S. 56, 2233. 
Keyes, D. B. A Study of the Absorption of Sulphur Dioxide from Flue Gases, 

J. Soc. Chem. Ind. 53, 692. 
Keyes, D. B. Appraisal of a Chemical Invention, a chapter in "The Law of 

Patents for Chemists," by Joseph Rossman, 2nd Ed. Inventors Pub. Co., 

Washington, D. C. 
Keyes, D. B. A Plea for the Unit Process, Chem. Met. Eng. 41, 244. 
Keyes, D. B. A Study of Boiler Waters in High Pressure Plants (Abstract), 

Trans. 111. State Acad. Sci. 26, 77. 
Keyes, D. B. and Barr, Frank T. Equilibria in a Chemical System. Hydrogen 

Sulfide — Propylene — Isopropyl Mercaptan-w-Propyl Mercaptan, Ind. Eng. 

Chem. 26, 1111. 
Keyes, D. B., Duffey, H. R., and Snow, R. D. Effect of Catalysts on the Re- 
action Between Olefins and Hydrogen Sulfide, Ind. Eng. Chem. 26, 91. 
Keyes, D. B. and Gallagher, M. The Activities of Ethylene and Ethanol in 

Sulfuric Acid, J.A.C.S. 56, 2221. 



120 University of Illinois 



Kistler, S. S. Colloids, Chap. 5, Vol. 8, Annual Survey of American Chemistry, 

Chemical Catalog Co., New York. 
Krase, Norman W. and Saddington, Arthur W. Vapor — Liquid Equilibria in 

the System Nitrogen— Water, J.A.C.S. 56, 353. 
Marvel, C. S. and Eck, John C. A Convenient Synthesis of ^/-Lysine, J. Biol. 

Chem. 106, 387. 
Marvel, C. S., Frederick, D. S., and Cogan, H. D. The Reaction Between 

Sulfur Dioxide and Olefins. Cyclohexene, J.A.C.S. 56, 1815. 
Marvel, C. S. and Gibbs, C. F. Quaternary Ammonium Salts from Bromo- 

propyldialkylamines. IV. Formation of Four-Membered Rings, J.A.C.S. 56, 

725. 
Noyes, W. A. Robinson's Electronic Theories of Organic Chemistry, J. Soc. 

Chem. Ind. 53, 559. 
Phipps, T. E. and Copley, M. J. The Surface Ionization of Potassium on 

Tungsten, Phys. Review 45, 344. 
Phipps, T. E. and Copley, M. J. Reflection Coefficient of Electrons, Phys. 

Review 46, 144. 
Phipps, T. E. and Klabunde, W. The Stern-Gerlach Experiment with Iron, 

Phys. Review 45, 59. 
Rodebush, W. H. The Third Law of Thermodynamics, J. Chem. Physics 2, 668. 
Rodebush, W. H. Dipole Moment and Ionic Binding, Trans. Faraday Soc. 30, 

778. 
Rodebush, W. H. Some Chemical Reactions Involving Active Nitrogen, 

J.A.C.S. 56, 97. 
Rose, Wm. C. and Caldwell, Clyde T. Feeding Experiments with Mixtures of 

Highly Purified Amino Acids. IV. The Supplementing Effect of Casein 

Fractions Obtained by the Carbamate Procedure, J. Biol. Chem. 107, 45. 
Rose, Wm. C. and Caldwell, Clyde T. Feeding Experiments with Mixtures of 

Highly Purified Amino Acids. V. Additional Properties of the Unknown 

Growth Essential Present in Proteins, J. Biol. Chem. 107 , 57. 
Rose, Wm. C. and Womack, Madelyn. Feeding Experiments with Mixtures of 

Highly Purified Amino Acids. VI. The Relation of Phenylalanine and 

Tyrosine to Growth, J. Biol. Chem. 107, 449. 
Shriner, R. L. and Ma, S. Y. Di-urethans as Local Anesthetics, J.A.C.S. 56, 

1630. 
Shriner, R. L., Pezold, Margaret, and Schreiber, R. S. The Hydrolysis of 

Substituted Sulfonanilides. II, J.A.C.S. 56, 696. 
Shriner, R. L. and Schreiber, R. S. The Hydrolysis of Substituted Benzene- 

sulfonanilides, J.A.C.S. 56, 114. 
Shriner, R. L. and Schreiber, R. S. The Hydrolysis of Substituted Benzene- 

sulfonanilides. III. Acid Hydrolysis, J.A.C.S. 56, 1618. 
Shriner, R. L. and Todd, H. R. A Comparison of the Activating Effect of the 

Sulfone Group with that of the Nitro Group, J.A.C.S. 56, 1382. 
Sisson, Wayne A. X-Ray Analysis of Textile Fibres. Part 1A, Textile Re- 
search 4, 429. 
Sisson, Wayne A. X-Ray Analysis of Textile Fibres. Part II, Textile Research 

4, 286. 
Sisson, Wayne A. and Farr, Wanda K. X-Ray Diffraction Patterns of Cellu- 
lose Particles and Interpretations of Cellulose Diffraction Data, Contrib. 

from Boyce Thompson Inst. 6, 315. 
Smith, G. Frederick. The Improved Dehydration of Air for Use in the Manu- 
facture of High-Pressure Tank Oxygen Using Anhydrous Magnesium 

Perchlorate, J. Soc. Chem. Ind. 53, 357. 
Smith, G. Frederick. Mixed Perchloric and Sulfuric Acids. I. Simultaneous 

Oxidizing and Reducing Properties of Hot Concentrated Perchloric Acid, 

Ind. Eng. Chem., Anal. Ed. 6, 229. 
Smith, G. Frederick and Friedman, Bernard S. The Hydrochloric Acid Meta- 
thesis of Barium Perchlorate to Form Perchloric Acid, J. Soc. Chem. Ind. 

53, 299. 



Department of Chemistry 121 

Smith, G. Frederick and Getz, C. A. Mixed Perchloric and Sulfuric Acids. II. 
Potassium Ferro- and Ferricyanides as Reference Standards in the Evalua- 
tion of Titanous Solutions, Ind. Eng. Chem., Anal. Ed. 6, 252. 

Smith, G. Frederick and Gring, J. L. Rubber Stopper Remolding for Reduced 
Pressure Filtration, Ind. Eng. Chem., Anal. Ed. 6, 385. 

Smith, G. Frederick, Stubblefield, F. M., and Middleton, E. B. Occlusion of 
Water by Potassium and Sodium Chlorides. The Influence on Indirect 
Determination of Sodium, Ind. Eng. Chem., Anal. Ed. 6, 314. 

Swann, Sherlock, Jr., Appel, E. G., and Kistler, S. S. Thoria Aerogel 
Catalyst: Aliphatic Esters to Ketones, Ind. Eng. Chem. 26, 1014. 

Swann, Sherlock, Jr., Kistler, S. S., and Appel, E. G. Aerogel Catalysts. 
Thoria: Preparation of Catalyst and Conversions of Organic Acids to 
Ketones, Ind. Eng. Chem. 26, 388. 

1935 

Adams, Roger, Bartz, Quentin R., and Miller, Richard F. The Introduction 

of Isobutyl Groups into Phenols, Cresols and Homologous Compounds, 

J.A.C.S. 57, 371. 
Adams, Roger and Gruber, E. E. Synthesis of Certain Hydrogenated Phenan- 

threnes, J.A.C.S. 57, 2555. 
Adams, Roger and Hanford, W. E. The Structure of Vasicine. II. Synthesis 

of Desoxyvasicine, J.A.C.S. 57, 921. 
Adams, Roger and Hanford, W. E. Stereochemistry of Diphenyls. XLI. The 

Effect of 4'-Substitution on the Rate of Racemization of 2-Nitro-6-carboxy- 

2'-methoxydiphenyl, J.A.C.S. 57, 1592. 
Adams, Roger and Li, C. C. Stereochemistry of Diphenyls. XL. The Effect of 

Temperature and Solvent on the Rate of Racemization of 2-Nitro-6-carboxy- 

2'-alkoxydiphenyls, J.A.C.S. 57, 1565. 
Adams, Roger, Morris, R. C, and Hanford, W. E. Structure of Vasicine. III. 

Position of the Hydroxyl Group, J.A.C.S. 57, 951. 
Adams, Roger and Patterson, W. I. Stereochemistry of Diphenyls. XXXIX. 

Synthesis of Active 2, 6-Dibromo-3, 3'-diamino-4, 4'-ditolyl, J.A.C.S. 57, 762. 
Audrieth, L. F., Ulich, H., and Peisker, H. Dipol-Momente von Hydrazin und 

seinen Derivaten (II. Mitteil.), Ber. 68, 1677. 
Buswell, A. M. The Treatment of "Beer Slop" and Similar Wastes, Water 

Works and Sewerage 82, 135. 
Buswell, A. M. and Burtle, Jerome. A Comparison of Permanganate Oxygen 

Demand, B. O. D., and Direct Absorption of Oxygen, Sewage Works J. 7, 

839. 
Buswell, A. M., Gerber, W. D., McClure, S. M., and Tarvin, D. Data on the 

Ground Waters of Lake County, 111., Dept. Regist. and Educ. State Water 

Survey Div., Circular 17. 
Buswell, A. M., Gerber, W. D., McClure, S. M., and Tarvin, D. A Survey of 

the Ground- Water Resources of 111., Dept. Regist. and Educ. State Water 

Survey Div., Circular 18. 
Buswell, A. M., Tarvin, D., and Todd, H. R. The Determination of Free 

Chlorine, J. Am. Water Works Assoc. 26, 1645. 
Carter, Herbert E. The Metabolism of Norleucine, Isoleucine, and Valine. I. 

The Synthesis of Some Phenyl Derivatives, J. Biol. Chem. 108, 619. 
Clark, George L. X-Ray Is Answering the Question "What Is Glass?" Ceramic 

Ind. 24, 34. 
Clark, George L. Progress in X-Ray Research on Rubber, Rubber Age 38, 79. 
Clark, George L. X-Rays — What Should We Know About Them? Elec. Eng. 

54, 3. 
Clark, George L. and Beckwith, M. M. A Method for Detection and Evalua- 
tion of Residual Distortion in Crystals with Special Reference to Electric 

Steel, Zeit. Kristallographie 90, 392. 
Clark, George L., Chesters, J. H., and Lyon, K. C. The Burning of Magnesite 

Bricks. Part III. Crystal Size Determination by the Laue Diffraction 

Method, Trans. Ceramic Soc. 34, 243. 



122 University of Illinois 



Clark, George L., Parker, E. A., Schaad, J. A., and Warren, W. J. New 

Measurements of Previously Unknown Large Interplanar Spacings in 

Natural Materials, J.A.C.S. 57, 1509. 
Clark, George L. and Reynolds, D. H. An X-Ray Diffraction Method for the 

Estimation of Quartz in a Mixture of Silicate Ores, U. of Toronto Studies, 

Geolog. Series 38. 
Clark, George L., Schmitt, Francis O., and Bear, Richard S. The Role of 

Lipoids in the X-Ray Diffraction Patterns on Nerve, Science 82, 44. 
Clark, George L., Schmitt, Francis O., and Bear, Richard S. X-Ray Diffrac- 
tion Studies on Nerve, Radiology 25, 131. 
Clark, George L., Sterrett, R. R., and Leppla, P. W. X-Ray Diffraction Studies 

of Built-up Films of Long-Chain Compounds, J.A.C.S. 57, 330. 
Englis, D. T. Sweets from Artichokes, Illinois Chemistry Teacher 2, 1. 
Englis, D. T. and Friedman, Bernard S. The Detection of the Fortification or 

Adulteration of Meat Broth with Mono-Sodium-Glutamate, Trans. 111. State 

Acad. Sci. 28, 119. 
Englis, D. T., Lynn, G. E., and Milum, V. G. The Analysis of Twenty Five 

Illinois Honeys and the Quantitative Methods Used. Illinois Beekeep. Assn., 

Annual Report, 1933-34, 54. 
Fuson, R. C. The Principle of Vinylogy, Chem. Reviews 16, 1. 
Fuson, R. C, Alexander, L. L., and Jacoby, A. L. The Reversibility of the 

Friedel-Crafts Condensation. Hydrogenation Phenomena, J.A.C.S. 57, 2208. 
Fuson, R. C, Bull, Benton A., and Ross, Wm. E. The Haloform Reaction. 

XV. Stepwise Halogenation, J.A.C.S. 57, 764. 
Fuson, R. C. and Johnson, Robert. The Haloform Reaction. XVI. The Action 

of Hypoiodite on Hindered Ketones, J.A.C.S. 57, 919. 
Fuson, R. C, Weinstock, H. H., Jr., and Ullyot, G. E. A New Synthesis of 

Benzoins. 2', 4', 6'-Trimethylbenzoin, J.A.C.S. 57, 1803. 
Hopkins, B S. and Naeser, C. R. Observations on the Rare Earths. XL VI. 

The Atomic Weight of Gadolinium, J.A.C.S. 57, 2183. 
Hopkins, B S., Pearce, D. W., and Quirke, T. T. Chemical Stability of the 

Terminal Faces of Acicular Crystals, Am. J. Sci. 30, 116. 
Hopkins, B S., Reed, J. B., and Audrieth, L. F. Observations on the Rare 

Earths. XLIV. Preparation of Anhydrous Rare Earth Compounds by the 

Action of Fused and Solid "Onium" Salts on the Oxides, J.A.C.S. 57, 1159. 
Hopkins, B S. and West, D. H. Observations on the Rare Earths. XLV. 

Preparation of Rare Earth Amalgams by Displacement, J.A.C.S. 57, 2185. 
Johnstone, H. F. Recovery of Sulfur Dioxide from Waste Gases. Equilibrium 

Partial Vapor Pressure Over Solutions of the Ammonia-Sulfur Dioxide- 
Water System, Ind. Eng. Chem. 27, 587. 
Keyes, D. B. Chemical Engineering Problems of Our Mineral Resources, 

University of 111., Bulletin 18. 
Keyes, D. B. The Teaching of Chem. Engineering Unit Processes, Proc. 

Fourth Symposium on Chem. Eng. Ed., Am. Instit. Chem. Eng., page 58. 
Keyes, D. B. and Johnstone, H. F. Recovery of Sulfur Dioxide from Waste 

Gases. Distillation of a Three-compound System, Ammonia-Sulfur Dioxide 

—Water, Ind. Eng. Chem. 27, 659. 
Krase, Norman W. Design and Equipment of a Chemical Engineering Labo- 
ratory, Chem. Met. Eng. 42, 493. 
Krase, Norman W. and Singh, Alamjit D. Synthesis of Acetic Acid from 

Methanol and Carbon Monoxide, Ind. Eng. Chem. 27, 909. 
Marvel, C. S., Copenhaver, J. W., and Roy, Max F. Hexa-^-alkylphenylethanes. 

The Effect of the />-Alkyl Group on the Dissociation of the Ethane, J.A.C.S. 

57, 1311. 
Marvel, C. S. and Eck, J. C. The Synthesis of Bis-2, 2'-(l, 3-diphenylindenol-3). 

A Contribution to the Rubrene Problem, J.A.C.S. 57, 1898. 
Marvel, C. S., Ford, J. H., and Thompson, C. D. Rearrangement of Polyynes. 

VII. Formation of Allenes, J.A.C.S. 57, 2619. 
Marvel, C. S. and Gibbs, C. F. Quaternary Ammonium Salts from Bromo- 

propyldialkylamines. V. Conversion of Cyclic Ammonium Salts to Linear 

Polymers, J.A.C.S. 57, 1137. 



Department of Chemistry 123 

Marvel, C. S. and Hunt, Madison. The Reaction Between Sulfur Dioxide and 

Olefins. II. Propylene, J.A.C.S. 57, 1691. 
Marvel, C. S. and Ryden, L. L. The Reaction Between Sulfur Dioxide and 

Olefins. III. Higher Olefins and Some Limitations of the Reaction, J.A.C.S. 

57, 2311. 
Marvel, C. S. and Schniepp, L. E. Some Reactions of S-Aminovaleric Acid and 

Its Derivatives, J.A.C.S. 57, 1557. 
Marvel, C. S. and Schniepp, L. E. Di-/>-alkylphenyldibiphenyleneethanes. The 

Effect of the p-A\ky\ Group on the Dissociation of the Ethane, J.A.C.S. 57, 

1635. 
Noyes, W. A. The Way Forward in Chemistry, Science 82, 357. 
Noyes, W. A. Electronic Theories, Chem. Reviews 17, 1. 
Parr, Rosalie M. Vitamins in Relation to Health. A New Project for High 

School Science Classes, 111. Chem. Teacher 2, 4. 
Phipps, T. E. and Copley, M. J. The Surface Ionization of Potassium on 

Tungsten, Phys. Review 48, 960. 
Phipps, T. E. and Copley, M. J. Surface Ionization of Potassium Iodide on 

Tungsten, J. Chem. Phys. 3, 594. 
Phipps, T. E., Copley, M. J., and Glasser, Julian. An Ionization Gauge for 

the Detection of Molecular Rays, Review of Sci. Instruments 6, 371. 
Phipps, T. E., Copley, M. J., Simpson, O. C, and Tenney, H. M. A Study of 

the Speed of Divergent Nozzle Pumps, Review of Sci. Instruments 6, 265. 
Phipps, T. E., Spealman, M. L., and Cooke, T. G. A Glass Manometer for 

Laboratory Use by Students in Physical Chemistry, J. Chem. Ed. 12, 321. 
Reedy, J. H. Technique of Micro Methods in Analytical Chemistry, Trans. 111. 

State Acad. Sci. 27, 79. 
Reedy, J. H. and Nicholson, D. G. The Explosive Reaction of Bismuth with 

Perchloric Acid, J.A.C.S. 57, 817. 
Reedy, J. H. and Phipps, H. E. Observations of Polymorphism, J. Phys. Chem. 

40, 89. 
Rodebush, W. H. Absolute Rate of a Chemical Reaction, J. Chem. Phys. 3, 242. 
Rodebush, W. H. The Reaction Between Nitric Oxide and Atomic Oxygen, 

Chem. Reviews 17, 409. 
Rodebush, W. H. and Cooke, T. G. Conductance of Salt Crystals, J. Chem. 

Phys. 3, 834. 
Rodebush, W. H. and Spealman, M. L. The Recombination of Hydrogen Atoms 

in the Presence of Hydrogen Chloride, J.A.C.S. 57, 1040. 
Rodebush, W. H. and Spealman, M. L. The Reactions of Some Oxides of 

Nitrogen with Atomic Oxygen and Nitrogen, J.A.C.S. 57, 1474. 
Rodebush, W. H. and Spealman, M. L. The Action of Hydrogen Bromide on 

the Nitrogen Afterglow, J.A.C.S. 57, 1881. 
Rose, Wm. C. The Metabolism of Creatine and Creatinine, Ann. Review of 

Biochem. 4, 243. 
Rose, Wm. C, McCoy, Richard H., and Meyer, Curtis E. Feeding Experi- 
ments with Mixtures of Highly Purified Amino Acids. VIII. Isolation and 

Identification of a New Essential Amino Acid, J. Biol. Chem. 112, 283. 
Rose, Wm. C. and Womack, Madelyn. Feeding Experiments with Mixtures of 

Highly Purified Amino Acids. VII. The Dual Nature of the "Unknown 

Growth Essential," J. Biol. Chem. 112, 275. 
Russell, Alfred. The Natural Tannins, Chem. Reviews 17, 155. 
Shriner, R. L. and Ruberg, Leone A. The Local Anesthetic Action of Dialkyl- 

aminoethoxyethyl />-Aminobenzoates, J.A.C.S. 57, 1581. 
Shriner, R. L. and Schreiber, R. S. Anomalous Mutarotation of Amine Salts of 

d-Camphor-10-sulfonic Acid. Attempted Resolution of Tri-substituted 

Nitrogen Compounds, J.A.C.S. 57, 1306. 
Shriner, R. L. and Schreiber, R. S. Anomalous Mutarotation of Salts of 

Reychler's Acid. II. Ketimine Formation from Amine Salts of d-Camphor- 

10-sulfonic Acid, J.A.C.S. 57, 1445. 
Shriner, R. L. and Schreiber, R. S. Anomalous Mutarotation of Salts of 

Reychler's Acid. III. Reduction of Ketimines of d-Camphor-10-sulfonic 

Acid, J.A.C.S. 57, 1896. 



124 University of Illinois 



Shriner, R. L. and Thurston, J. T. Asymmetric Syntheses. IV. The Action of 

Optically Active Nitrates on 2-Bromofluorene, J.A.C.S. 57, 2163. 
Sisson, Wayne A. X-Ray Studies of Crystallite Orientation in Cellulose Fibers, 

Ind. Eng. Chem. 27, 51. 
Sisson, Wayne A. X-Ray Analysis of Textile Fibres. Part III. Structure of 

the Cellulose Crystallite as Interpreted from X-Ray Diffraction Data, 

Textile Research 5, 119. 
Smith, G. Frederick and Getz, C. A. The Improved Synthesis of o-Phenan- 

throline, Chem. Reviews 16, 113. 
Smith, G. Frederick and Hardy, V. R. Die Herstellung von Wasserfreien 

Perchloraten des Magnesiums und der Erdalkalimetalle durch Reaktionen 

Zwischen Festen Stoffen, Zeit. anorg. allgem. Chem. 223, 1. 
Smith, G. Frederick and Koch, E. G. Darstellung und Eigenschaften der 

Perchloratammine der Erdalkalimetalle, Zeit. anorg. allgem. Chem. 223, 17. 
Smith, G. Frederick, McVickers, L. D., and Sullivan, V. R. Mixed Perchloric 

and Sulfuric Acids. III. The Determination of Chromium in Chromic 

Oxide, J. Soc. Chem. Ind. 54, 369T. 
Smith, G. Frederick and Smith, Glenn P. The Determination of Chromium in 

Stainless Steel, Using Perchloric, Phosphoric, and Sulfuric Acids, J. Soc. 

Chem. Ind. 54, 185T. 
Smith, G. Frederick and Sullivan, V. R. Volumetric Determination of Iron in 

Leather, Ind. Eng. Chem., Anal. Ed. 7 , 301. 
Smith, G. Frederick and Sullivan, V. R. Determination of Chromium on 

Chrome Tanned Leather, J. Am. Leather Chem. Assoc. 30, 442. 
Spielman, M. A. The Structure of Troeger's Base, J.A.C.S. 57, 583. 
Spielman, M. A. The Decomposition of Triphenylmethyl Hyponitrite, J.A.C.S. 

57, 1117. 

Straub, Frederick G. Cause and Prevention of Turbine-Blade Deposits, Trans. 

Am. Soc. Mech. Eng. 57, 447. 
Straub, Frederick G. Continuous Production of Distilled Water Free from 

Carbon Dioxide and Ammonia, Ind. Eng. Chem., Anal. Ed. 7, 433. 
Straub, Frederick G. Purified Steam Economics, The Paper Industry 17, 572. 
Swann, Sherlock, Jr., Deditius, L. F., and Pyhrr, W. A. Electrolytic Reduction 

of Ketones in Glacial Acetic Acid. II. Reduction of Aliphatic Ketones to 

Hydrocarbons, Trans. Electrochem. Soc. 68, 321. 
Swann, Sherlock, Jr. and Feldman, Jack. Electrolytic Reduction of Methyl 

n-Propyl Ketone to w-Pentane, Trans. Electrochem. Soc. 67, 195. 
Swann, Sherlock, Jr. and Nelson, G. H. The Electrolytic Reduction of Aceto- 

phenone, Trans. Electrochem. Soc. 67, 201. 

1936 

Adams, Roger and Hsing, Chi Yi. Relative Rates of Racemization of Substi- 
tuted Diamides of 2, 2'-Dimethoxy-6, 6'-dicarboxydiphenyl. XLII, J.A.C.S. 

58, 587. 

Adams, Roger and Leffler, Marlin T. Succinic-a-d-a'-d Acid and Its Deriva- 
tives. II. Stereochemistry of the Type RR'CHD, J.A.C.S. 58, 1551. 

Adams, Roger and Leffler, Marlin T. Stereochemistry of Deuterium Com- 
pounds of the type RR'CHD :Camphane-2, 3-d 2 , J.A.C.S. 58, 1555. 

Adams, Roger and McLean, Andrew. Succinic-a-d 2 -a'-d 2 Acid and Its Deriva- 
tives, J.A.C.S. 58, 804. 

Adams, Roger and Miller, R. F. Contribution to the Multiplanar Isomerism of 
Cyclohexanes, J.A.C.S. 58, 787. 

Audrieth, L. F. A Symposium on Complex Inorganic Compounds. Introduction 
to the Symposium, Chem. Reviews 19, 55. 

Audrieth, L. F., Long, A., and Edwards, R. E. Fused "Onium" Salts as Acids. 
Reactions in Fused Pyridinium Hydrochloride, J.A.C.S. 58, 428. 

Bailar, John C, Jr. The Stereochemistry of Complex Inorganic Compounds, 
Chem. Reviews 19, 67. 

Bailar, John C, Jr. and Balthis, J. H., Jr. Some Chromous and Chromic 
Ammines, J.A.C.S. 58, 1474. 



Department of Chemistry 125 

Bailar, John C, Jr., Barney, Allan J., and Miller, R. F. The Action of 

Alkalies on Mixtures of Aromatic Aldehydes, J.A.C.S. 58, 2110. 
Bailar, John C, Jr., Haslam, J. H., and Jones, Eldon M. The Stereochemistry 

of Complex Inorganic Molecules. III. The Reaction of Ammonia with 

Levo-Dichlorodiethylenediaminocobaltic Chloride, J.A.C.S. 58, 2226. 
Bailar, John C, Jr., Jonelis, Frank G., and Huffman, E. H. The Stereo- 
chemistry of Complex Inorganic Compounds. II. The Reaction of Carbo- 
nates with Dichlorodiethylenediaminocobaltic Chloride, J.A.C.S. 58, 2224. 
Bailar, John C, Jr. and Parsons, Theophilus, Jr. The Preparation of Methyl 

Substituted Azobenzenes and Azoxybenzenes and the Rearrangement of 

Alethyl Substituted Azoxybenzenes, J.A.C.S. 58, 268. 
Buswell, A. M. and Larson, T. E. Optical Difficulties with the Cylindrical 

Cataphoresis Cell, J. Phys. Chem. 40, 833. 
Buswell, A. M. and LeBosquet, M. Complete Treatment of Distillery Wastes, 

Ind. Eng. Chem. 28, 795. 
Clark, George L. A 1936 Survey of the Biological Effects of X-Radiation, 

Radiology 26, 295. 
Clark, George L. and Gring, John L. Practical Apparatus for Spectroscopic 

Chemical Analysis, Review of Sci. Instruments 7, 305. 
Clark, George L. and Leppla, P. W. X-Ray Diffraction Studies of Built-up 

Films, J.A.C.S. 58, 2199. 
Clark, George L., Mrgudich, J. N., and Schieltz, N. C. Die basischen Sulfate 

des Bleis, Zeit. anorg. allgem. Chem. 229, 401. 
Clark, George L. and Reynolds, Dexter H. Quantitative Analysis of Mine 

Dusts. An X-Ray Diffraction Method, Ind. Eng. Chem., Anal. Ed. 8, 36. 
Clark, George L. and Schaad, John A. X-Ray Diffraction Studies o^ Tendon 

and Intestinal Wall Collagen, Radiology 27 , 339. 
Clark, George L., Sisson, Wayne A., and Parker, Edward A. Adsorption 

Edges in the X-Ray Patterns of Native and Mercerized Cellulose, J.A.C.S. 

58, 1635. 
Clark, George L. and Smith, Albert F. X-Ray Diffraction Studies in Chitin, 

Chitosan, and Derivatives, J. Phys. Chem. 40, 863. 
Clark, George L., Sterrett, Robert R., and Lincoln, B. H. X-Ray Diffraction 

Studies of Lubricants. (1) Structure of Solid and Unimolecular Films and 

Orientation Effects of Addition Agents, Ind. Eng. Chem. 28, 1318. 
Clark, George L., Sterrett, Robert R., and Lincoln, B. H. X-Ray Diffraction 

Studies of Lubricants. (2) Molecular Regimentation and Chemical Reactions 

in Liquid Oils and Blends, Ind. Eng. Chem. 28, 1322. 
Clark, George L., Sterrett, Robert R., and Lincoln, B. H. X-Ray Diffraction 

Studies of Lubricants. (3) X-Ray Method of Rating Lubricants in Terms 

of Protection Against Surface Wear, Ind. Eng. Chem. 28, 1326. 
Connor, Ralph, Fleming, C. L., Jr., and Clayton, Temple. The Michael Con- 
densation. IV. The Active Methylene Group in Sulfones, J.A.C.S. 58, 1386. 
Cope, Arthur C. Products of the Reaction of Ethyl Dichloroacetate with 

Alcoholic Sodium Ethoxide, J.A.C.S. 58, 570. 
Copley, M. J. and Glasser, Julian. Surface Ionization of Cesium on Tungsten, 

J.A.C.S. 58, 1057. 
Deitz, V. The Vapor Pressure of Potassium Chloride and Caesium Iodide 

Crystals, J. Chem. Phys. 4, 575. 
Englis, D. T., Lynn, E. G., and Milum, V. G. Effect of Processing and Storage 

on Composition and Color of Honey, Food Research 1, 255. 
Englis, D. T. and Stegeman, R. A. Observations of the Determination of 

Cuprous Oxide as Applied to Sugar Analysis, J. Assoc. Official Agr. Chem. 

19, 480. 
Fuson, R. C. and Alexander, L. L. The Reversibility of the Friedel-Crafts 

Reaction. Hydrogenation, J.A.C.S. 58, 1745. 
Fuson, R. C, Alexander, L. L., Ellingboe, Ellsworth, and Hoffman, Arnold. 

The Addition of Benzene to Benzalquinaldines and Benzallepidines, J.A.C.S. 

58, 1979. 
Fuson, R. C. and Arnold, Richard T. A New Synthesis of Mixed Benzoins. 

Second Paper, J.A.C.S. 58, 1295. 



126 University of Illinois 



Fuson, R. C. and Babcock, S. H., Jr. The Rearrangement of l-Phenyl-5- 

benzoylcyclopentene Oxide, J.A.C.S. 58, 2325. 
Fuson, R. C. and Christ, R. E. The Condensation of /3-Cyclocitral with Di- 

methylacrolein, Science 84, 294. 
Fuson, R. C, Christ, R. E., and Whitman, G. M. The Condensation of Pro- 

penyl Ketones with Ethyl Oxalate, J.A.C.S. 58, 2450. 
Fuson, R. C, Hully, H. H., and Brock, F. H. Dihydro-1, 4-pyrans. V. The 

Structure of the 3-Cyano Derivatives, J.A.C.S. 58, 2634. 
Fuson, R. C, Lippert, Arnold, Young, R. V., and Hully, H. H. A Cyclopentane 

Derivative from 1, 4-Dibromo-l, 4-dibenzoylbutane, J.A.C.S. 58, 2633. 
Fuson, R. C. and Weinstock, H. H., Jr. Mesityl Phenyl Diketone, J.A.C.S. 58, 

1233. 
Fuson, R. C. and Weinstock, H. H., Jr. The Interconversion of Mixed 

Benzoins, J.A.C.S. 58, 1986. 
Gurin, Samuel. High Vacuum Distillation of N-Acyl Amino Acid and Poly- 
peptide Esters, J.A.C.S. 58, 2104. 
Gurin, Samuel and Segal, C. F. Helianthates of Amino Acid and Polypeptide 

Esters, J.A.C.S. 58, 2107. 
Hopkins, B S. Recent Developments in the Chemistry of the Rare-Earth Group, 

J. Chem. Ed. 13, 363. 
Hopkins, B S., Mattern, L. W., Segerblom, Wilhelm, and Gordon, N. E. An 

Outline of the Essentials for a Year of High School Chemistry, J. Chem. 

Ed. 13, 175. 
Hopkins, B S., Pearce, D. W., and Naeser, C. R. Observations on the Rare 

Earths. Part XLII. Studies in the Electrolytic Reduction of Ytterbium, 

Trans. Electrochem. Soc. 69, 557. 
Johnstone, H. F. and Kunz, Jacob. Graphical Solution of a Differential Equa- 
tion of Diffusion and Chemical Reaction, Science Reports, Univ. of Tohoku, 

Anniversary Volume, Series I. 
Keyes, D. B. Cracking of Petroleum — An Example of the Methods of Teaching 

the Fundamentals of Unit Processes, Trans. Am. Inst. Chem. Eng. 32, 472. 
Marvel, C. S., Brown, J. H., and Durand, H. W. The Reduction of Aromatic 

Compounds with Hydrogen and a Platinum Oxide-Platinum Black Catalyst 

in the Presence of Halogen Acid, J.A.C.S. 58, 1594. 
Marvel, C. S. and Cowan, John Charles. Ammonium Salts from Bromopropy- 

lamines. VI. Salts of Polymeric Tertiary Amines, J.A.C.S. 58, 2277. 
Marvel, C. S. and Farley, E. D. Rearrangements of Polyynes. VIII. Forma- 
tion of Diallenes, J.A.C.S. 58, 29. 
Marvel, C. S., Pinkney, P. S., Nesty, G. A., and Wiley, R. H. Hydrophenan- 

threnes and Related Ring Systems from Dieneynes, J.A.C.S. 58, 972. 
Marvel, C. S. and Ryden, L. L. Polysulfones from Acetylenes and Sulfur 

Dioxide, J.A.C.S. 58, 2047. 
Marvel, C. S. and Sparks, Wm. J. Rearrangement of Polyynes. IX. Dimers of 

Tri-/-butyl-ethynylmethyl Halides, J.A.C.S. 58, 865. 
Nicholson, D. G. The Reaction of Hydrogen Peroxide with Chromic Anhydride 

in Dry Ethyl Acetate, J.A.C.S. 58, 2525. 
Nicholson, D. G. Titanium-Hydrogen Peroxide Compounds, Trans. 111. State 

Acad. Sci. 29, 97. 
Noyes, W. A. and Singh, Bhagat. The Parachors of Methyl and Ethyl Nitrites 

and of Nitromethane and Nitroethane, J.A.C.S. 58, 802. 
Reedy, J. H. and Phipps, H. E. Observations on Plymorphism, J. Phys. Chem. 

40, 89. 
Rodebush, W. H. The Hydrogen Bond and Coordination, Chem. Reviews 19, 59. 
Rodebush, W. H. The Dipole Moments of the Alkali Halides, J. Chem. Phys. 4, 

536. 
Rodebush, W. H. The Absolute Rate of a Chemical Reaction: The Formal 

Thermodynamic Treatment, J. Chem. Phys. 4, 744. 
Rodebush, W. H. and Campbell, R. W. The Formation of Hydrogen Peroxide 

in the Electrodeless Discharge in Water Vapor, J. Chem. Phys. 4, 293. 
Rodebush, W. H., Murray, L. A., Jr., and Bixler, M. E. The Dipole Moments 

of the Alkali Halides, J. Chem. Phys. 4, 372. 



Department of Chemistry 127 

Rose, Wm. C. and Meyer, Curtis E. The Spatial Configuration of a-Amino-/3- 

hydroxy-w-butyric Acid, J. Biol. Chem. 115, 721. 
Rose, Wm. C. and Womack, Madelyn. The Relation of Leucine, Isoleucine, 

and Norleucine to Growth, J. Biol. Chem. 116, 381. 
Shriner, R. L, Cary, R. C, and Vitcha, J. F. Optically Active Quaternary 

Ammonium Salts from d- and / -2-Octyl />-Bromobenzenesulfonate and 

Tertiary Amines, J. Org. Chem. 1, 280. 
Shriner, R. L. and Dale, C. 2-Bromo-9-Nitrofluorene and 1, l-Dinitro-3, 3'-di- 

bromo-bifluorenyl, J.A.C.S. 58, 1502. 
Shriner, R. L. and Damschroder, R. E. Urethans as Local Anesthetics. III. 

Alkyl N-(8-Quinolyl) Carbamates, J.A.C.S. 58, 1610. 
Shriner, R. L. and Fessler, W. A. Derivatives of Tertiary Alcohols. Acid 

Phthalic Esters, J.A.C.S. 58, 1384. 
Shriner, R. L. and Sutherland, Harry. Anomalous Mutarotation of Salts of 

Reychler's Acid. IV. Comparison of 2-(N-phenylketimine)-d-camphane-10- 

sulfonic Acid with d-Camphor-10-sulfonanilide, J.A.C.S. 58, 62. 
Smith, G. Frederick. Analytical Chemistry, 1934 and 1935. A Chapter in the 

Tenth Annual Survey of American Chemistry, Chemical Catalog Co., New 

York. 
Smith, G. Frederick. An Improved Design of Rodgers Ring Burner, Ind. Eng. 

Chem, Anal. Ed. 8, 484. 
Smith, G. Frederick, McHard, J. A, and Olson, K. L. Determination of 

Manganese in Tungsten and Ferrotungsten, Ind. Eng. Chem., Anal. Ed. 8, 

350. 
Smith, G. Frederick, Sullivan, V. R, and Frank, Gerald. Hexanitrato Am- 
monium Cerate as a Proposed Reference Standard in Oxidimetry, Ind. Eng. 

Chem, Anal. Ed. 8, 449. 
Straub, Frederick G. Removal of Silica from Solution at Boiler Temperatures, 

Ind. Eng. Chem. 28, 36. 
Straub, Frederick G. Analcite. Preparation and Solubility Between 182° and 

282° C, Ind. Eng. Chem. 28, 113. 
Straub, Frederick G. and Bradbury, T. A. New Laboratory Data Relative to 

Embrittlement in Steam Boilers, Power Plant Engineering, 40, 104. 
Swann, Sherlock, Jr. Electro-organic Chemical Preparations, Trans. Electro- 

chem. Soc. 69, 287. 
Swann, Sherlock, Jr., Read, H. J, and Howard, F. C. Electrolytic Reductions 

of Organic Compounds at Alloy Cathodes. Part I. Reduction of Aliphatic 

Ketones to Hydrocarbons at Cadmium-Amalgams, Trans. Electrochem. Soc. 

69, 345. 

1937 
Adams, Roger and Babcock, S. H. Aminophenyl Thiazolines and Thiazines, 

J.A.C.S. 59, 2260. 
Adams, Roger, Burnett, W. B, Jenkins, R. L, Peet, C. H, and Dreger, E. E. 

Dialkylaminoalkanol Esters of />-Aminobenzoic Acid, J.A.C.S. 59, 2248. 
Adams, Roger, Campbell, K. N, and Morris, R. C. The Structure of Gossypol. 

I, J.A.C.S. 59, 1723. 

Adams, Roger, Friedman, B. S, and Sparks, Meredith. Aminophenyl Oxazoles 
and Thiazoles, J.A.C.S. 59, 2262. 

Adams, Roger and Jeanes, Allene. The Addition of Alkali Metals to Phenan- 
threne, J.A.C.S. 59, 2608. 

Adams, Roger and Kinney, C. R. Dideuteriovaline and Dideuterioleucine, 
J.A.C.S. 59, 897. 

Adams, Roger and Leffler, M. T. Aminophenvl-2-oxazolines as Local Anes- 
thetics, J.A.C.S. 59, 2252. 

Adams, Roger and McGrew, Frank C. Stereochemistry of Deuterium Com- 
pounds of the Type RR'CX H X D : Ethyl-^-ethylcarbinol, J.A.C.S. 59, 1497. 

Adams, Roger and Miller, R. F. Structure of Gossypol. IV. Anhydrogossypol 
and Its Derivatives, J.A.C.S. 59, 1736. 

Adams, Roger, Miller, R. F, and Butterbaugh, D. J. Structure of Gossypol. 

II. Acylation, J.A.C.S. 59, 1729. 



128 University of Illinois 



Adams, Roger and Morris, R. C. The Structure of Gossypol. III. Gossypol 

Ethers, J.A.C.S. 59, 1731. 
Adams, Roger and Novelli, A. Aminophenyl-2-pentoxyazolines, J.A.C.S. 59, 

2259. 
Audrieth, L. F., Slobutsky, Charles, and Campbell, R. W. Acid Catalysis in 

Liquid Ammonia. I. Ammonolysis of Diethylmalonate, Proc. Nat. Acad. 

Sci. 23, 611. 
Bailar, John C, Jr. Symposium on Complex Inorganic Compounds, Chem. 

Reviews 21, 1. 
Buswell, A. M., Boruff, C. S., and Upton, W. V. Adsorption of Fluoride from 

Salts by Alum Floe, Ind. Eng. Chem. 29, 1154. 
Buswell, A. M. and Burtle, Jerome. Oxygen Demand Studies, Sewage Works 

J. 9, 224. 
Buswell, A. M., Deitz, V., and Rodebush, W. H. Effect of Hydrogen Bond 

Formation on the Fundamental Frequency of the Hydroxyl Radical, J. 

Chem. Phys. 5, 84. 
Buswell, A. M., Deitz, V., and Rodebush, W. H. A Study of the Effect of 

Hydrogen Bonding upon the Infrared Absorption of the Hydroxyl Group, 

J. Chem. Phys. 5, 501. 
Buswell, A. M., Krebs, Karl, and Rodebush, W. H. Infrared Studies. III. 

Absorption Bands of Hydrogels Between 2.5 and 3.5 p, J.A.C.S. 59, 2603. 
Buswell, A. M. and Larson, T. E. Methane in Ground Waters, J. Am. Water 

Works Assoc. 29, 1978. 
Buswell, A. M. and Upton, W. V. Titanium Salts in Water Purification, Ind. 

Eng. Chem. 29, 870. 
Buswell, A. M. and Upton, W. V. Water Quality for Fire Fighting, 111. State 

Water Survey, Circular 19. 
Buswell, A. M. and Members of the Staff of State Water Survey. Preliminary 

Data on Surface Water Resources, 111. State Water Survey, Bulletin 31. 
Carter, H. E. and Van Loon, Edward J. The a-Bromo-/3-methoxy-/3-phenyl- 

propionic Acids, J.A.C.S. 59, 2555. 
Carter, H. E. and West, Harold D. Synthesis of a-Amino-/3-Hydroxy-n-butyric 

Acids. III. A Simple Method of Preparing a Mixture of the Two Forms, 

J. Biol. Chem. 119, 103. 
Carter, H. E. and West, Harold D. Synthesis of a-Amino-/?-hydroxy-M-butyric 

Acids. IV. Separation of Mixtures of the Two Forms and Preparation of 

d{— )-and /( + ) -Threonine, J. Biol. Chem. 119, 109. 
Carter, H. E., Wood, Marion L., and Madden, Robert J. Synthesis of a-Amino- 

/3-hydroxy-w-butyric Acids. II, J. Biol. Chem. 117 , 1. 
Clark, George L. Analysis by X-Rays of Ultimate Structures of Living Ma- 
terials, Biodynamica, August ; Radiology 30, 180. 
Clark, George L. The Applications of the X-Ray Diffraction Method to Non- 
metallic Materials, Symposium on Radiography and X-Ray Diffraction 

Methods. Published by Am. Soc. for Testing Materials, 339. 
Clark, George L. and Beckwith, M. M. X-Ray Diffraction Studies of Distor- 
tion in Metals, Trans. Am. Soc. for Metals, XXV, 1207. 
Clark, George L., Bradley, W. F., and Grim, R. E. A Study of the Behavior 

of Montmorillonite upon Wetting, Zeit. Kristallographie (A) 97, 216. 
Clark, George L. and Coe, W. S. Photochemical Reduction with X-Rays and 

Effects of Addition Agents, J. Chem. Phys. 5, 97. 
Clark, George L. and Dunn, C. G. X-Ray and Magnetic Analyses of Deformed 

Silicon Steel Rings, Phys. Review 52, 1170. 
Clark, George L. and Dunn, C. G. Magnetic Field of a Symmetrical Bundle of 

Parallel Wires Carrying Equal Currents, Phys. Review 52, 1167. 
Clark, George L., Grim, R. E., and Bradley, W F. Notes on the Identifica- 
tion of Minerals in Clays by X-Ray Diffraction, Zeit. Kristallographie (A) 

96, 322. 
Clark, George L. and Gring, J. L. Carotenoids in Yellow Corn, Ind. Eng. 

Chem., Anal. Ed. 9, 271. 
Clark, George L., and Gross, S. T. A New Type of Gnomonic Ruler, Science 

86, 272. 



Department of Chemistry 129 

Clark, George L. and Gross, S. T. Some of the Higher Hydrates of Trisodium 

phosphate NasPO* and Trisodium Vanadate Na 3 V0 4 , Zeit. Kristallographie 

(A) 98, 107. 
Clark, George L. and Mrgudich, J. N. The Determination of Lead Peroxide, 

Ind. Eng. Chem., Anal. Ed. 9, 256. 
Clark, George L., Mrgudich, J. N., Klaas, Rosalind, and Sweany, H. C. De- 
tection of Crystalline Silica in Lung Tissue by X-Ray Diffraction Analysis, 

Science 86, 544. 
Clark, George L. and Parker, E. A. An X-Ray Diffraction Study of the Action 

of Liquid Ammonia on Cellulose and Its Derivatives, J. Phys. Chem. 41, 777. 
Clark, George L. and Parker, E. A. Diffraction of X-Rays at Very Small 

Angles by Celluloses and Rayons, Science 85, 203. 
Clark, George L. and Reynolds, D. H. Chemistry of Zirconium Dioxide. 

X-Ray Diffraction Studies, Ind. Eng. Chem. 29, 711. 
Clark, George L. and Reynolds, D. A. The Crystal Structure of Zinc Meta- 

Antimonate Zn(Sb0 3 ) 2 , Zeit. Kristallographie (A) 98, 185. 
Clark, George L., Riecken, F. F., and Reynolds, D. H. X-Ray Diffraction 

Studies of Two-Micron Fractions of Some Genetic Soil Profiles, Zeit. 

Kristallographie (A) 96, 273. 
Clark, George L. and Ross, Sydney. Diffraction of X-Rays by Built-up Films 

of Proteins, Science 86, 292. 
Clark, George L., Schieltz, N. C, and Quirke, T. T. A New Study of the 

Preparation and Properties of the Higher Oxides of Lead, J.A.C.S. 59, 2305. 
Clark, George L. and Shenk, J. H. X-Ray Diffraction Studies of Globular 

Proteins. II. Hemoglobins, Radiology 28, 144. 
Clark, George L. and Shenk, J. H. X-Ray Diffraction Studies of Globular 

Proteins. III. The Action of Formaldehyde on Proteins, Radiology 28, 357. 
Clark, George L. and Shenk, J. H. X-Ray Diffraction Studies of Globular 

Proteins. I. Egg Albumin, Radiology 28, 58. 
Clark, George L., Simons, H. D., and Klein, O. C. X-Rays from Radio Tubes, 

Radiology 29, 721. 
Clark, George L. and Smith, A. F. New Mechanical Devices for the Measure- 
ment and Interpretation of Fiber Diffraction Patterns, Review Sci. Instru- 
ments 8, 199. 
Clark, George L. and Wolthuis, E. An Electron Diffraction Study of the 

Effect of Heat upon the Structure of Gold Leaf, J. Applied Phys. 8, 630. 
Clark, George L., Wolthuis, E., and Smith, W. H. X-Ray Diffraction Patterns 

of Sol, Gel, and Total Rubber when Stretched, and when Crystallized by 

Freezing and from Solutions, J. Research Nat. Bureau of Standards 19, 479. 
Clark, George L., Wolthuis, E., and Smith, W. H. X-Ray Diffraction Patterns 

of Sol, Gel, and Total Rubber when Stretched and when Crystallized by 

Freezing and from Solutions, Rubber Age 42, 35. 
Clark, George L., Wolthuis, E., and Smith, W. H. X-Ray Diffraction Patterns 

of Sol, Gel, and Total Rubber when Stretched and when Crystallized by 

Freezing and from Solutions (concluded), Rubber Age 42, 113. 
Copley, M. J. and Deitz, V. A Torsion Manometer for the Measurement of 

the Force of a Molecular Ray, Review of Scientific Instruments 8, 314. 
Englis, D. T. and Lynn, E. G. Use of an Electric Heater for the Lane and 

Eynon Titration of Reducing Sugars, Ind. Eng. Chem., Anal. Ed. 9, 314. 
Fuson, R. C. and Christ, R. E. The Application of the Principle of Vinylogy 

to Unsaturated Ketones, J.A.C.S. 59, 893. 
Fuson, R. C. and Ross, W. E. The Action of Methylmagnesium Bromide on 

2, 4, 6-Trichlorobenzoyl Chloride, J.A.C.S. 59, 1508. 
Hazlet, Stewart E. The Bromination of 4-Phenylphenylbenzenesulfonate, 

J.A.C.S. 59, 1087. 
Hopkins, B S. and Taebel, W. A. The Rare Earths as Catalysts, Trans. 

Electrochem. Soc. 71, 45. 
Johnstone, H. F. Recovery of Sulfur Dioxide from Waste Gases, Ind. Eng. 

Chem. 29, 1396. 



130 University of Illinois 



Johnstone, H. F. and Singh, A. D. Recovery of Sulfur Dioxide from Waste 

Gases, Ind. Eng. Chem. 29, 286. 
Keyes, D. B. and Foster, H. D. Catalysts for the Vapor-Phase Oxidation of 

Acetaldehyde, Ind. Eng. Chem. 29, 1254. 
Marvel, C. S. and Brown, J. H. Hexaalkylphenylethanes. III. Hexa-£-cyclo- 

hexylphenylethane and Hexa-m-tolylethane, J.A.C.S. 59, 1175. 
Marvel, C. S. and Brown, J. H. Hexaalkylphenylethanes. IV. Preparation of 

Some Alkylbromobenzenes, J.A.C.S. 59, 1176. 
Marvel, C. S. and Drake, Lewis R. Phosphonic Acids and Their Alkyl Esters 

from a, ^-Unsaturated Ketones, J. Org. Chem. 2, 387. 
Marvel, C. S., Glavis, F. J., and Ryden, L. L. The Reaction Between Sulfur 

Dioxide and Olefins. V. The Structure of the Polysulfones from Olefins 

of the Type RCH = CH 2 , J.A.C.S. 59, 707. 
Marvel, C. S. and Nesty, G. A. Cyclization of Dieneynes. IV. trans-\, 2- 

Dialkyloctahydronaphthalene Derivatives, J.A.C.S. 59, 2662. 
Marvel, C. S. and Pinkney, P. S. Fused Ring Systems from Dieneynes. VI. 

Some Limitations of the Cyclization Reaction, J.A.C.S. 59, 2669. 
Marvel, C. S., Pinkney, P. S., Nesty, G. A., and Pearson, D. E. Cyclization of 

Dieneynes. V. Hydrophenanthrenes, J.A.C.S. 59, 2666. 
Marvel, C. S. and Roy, Max F. The Dissociation of Hexa-/>-alkylphenylethanes, 

J.A.C.S. 59, 2622. 
Marvel, C. S., Ryden, L. L., and Glavis, F. J. The Reaction Between Sulfur 

Dioxide and Olefins and Acetylenes. VI. Ascaridole as a Catalyst for the 

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Marvel, C. S., Sparks, Wm. J., and Peppel, W. J. Rearrangements of Polyynes. 

X. Rearrangement Product of Hexa-J-butylethynylethane, J.A.C.S. 59, 1351. 
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Rose, Wm. C. The Nutritive Significance of the Amino Acids and Certain 

Related Compounds, Sci. 86, 298. 
Rose, Wm. C. and McCoy, Richard H. The Relation of Glycine and Serine to 

Growth, J. Biol. Chem. 117, 581. 
Rose, Wm. C, Womack, Madelyn, and Kem merer, Kenneth S. The Relation 

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Shriner, R. L. and Brown, G. B. Salts of Nitro Compounds. II. The Reaction 

of the Silver Salt of Phenylnitromethane with Diphenylbromomethane, 

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Shriner, R. L., Condo, F. E., Hinkel, E. T., and Fassero, A. Identification of 

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Department of Chemistry 131 

Smith, G. Frederick and Getz, C. A. Determination of Chromium in Chromite. 

A New Procedure Employing a Mixture of Phosphoric, Sulfuric, and 

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1938 

Adams, Roger and Butterbaugh, D. J. Structure of Gossypol. X. Apogossypol 

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Adams, Roger and Geissman, T. A. Structure of Gossypol. VII. Gossypol 

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Adams, Roger and Geissman, T. A. Structure of Gossypol. VIII. Derivatives 

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Adams, Roger and Geissman, T. A. The Structure of Gossypol. XII. Gossylic 

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Adams, Roger, Geissman, T. A., and Morris, R. C. Structure of Gossypol. 

XVII. Nitration Products of Gossypol Hexamethyl Ether, Gossypolone 
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Adams, Roger and Gruber, E. E. Lactone Formation in the Addition Product 

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Adams, Roger and Joyce, R. M., Jr. Stereochemistry of Biphenyls. XLV. 

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Adams, Roger and Morris, R. C. Structure of Gossypol. XIII. Conversion of 

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Structure of Gossypol. XIV. Apogossypolic Acid, J.A.C.S. 60, 2191. 



132 University of Illinois 



Adams, Roger, Morris, R. C, and Kirkpatrick, E. C. Structure of Gossypol. 

IX. Oxidation and Degradation of Gossypol Hexamethyl Esther; Gossic 

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Clark, George L., Sweany, H. C, and Klaas, Rosalind. The Detection 

of Crystalline Silica in Lung Tissue by X-Ray Diffraction Analysis, 

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Clark, George L., Tuckey, S. L., and Ruehe, H. A. An X-Ray Diffraction 

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Marvel, C. S., Copley, M. J., and Zellhoefer, G. F. Hydrogen Bonds Involving 

the C-H Link. V. The Solubility of Methylene Chloride in Donor Solvents, 

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134 University of Illinois 



Marvel, C. S., Davis, S. J., and Glavis, F. J. The Reaction Between Sulfur 

Dioxide and Olefins. VII. Copolymers from Mixtures of Olefins, Acety- 
lenes, and Olefin Derivatives with Sulfur Dioxide, J.A.C.S. 60, 1450. 
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Marvel, C. S. and Glass, Dudley B. The Possible Asymmetry of a Monosub- 

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Marvel, C. S. and Glavis, F. J. Vinyl Halide Polysulfones. Peracetic Acid 

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60, 2622. 
Marvel, C. S. and Levesque, Charles L. The Structure of Vinyl Polymers: 

The Polymer from Methyl Vinyl Ketone, J.A.C.S. 60, 280. 
Marvel, C. S., Mueller, Max B., and Peppel, W. J. Rearrangement of Styryl 

Substituted Ethanes. XI, J.A.C.S. 60, 410. 
Marvel, C. S. and Nichols, Velma E. Diaryl Ketone Peroxides, J.A.C.S. 60, 

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Marvel, C. S. and Pacevitz, H. A. The Dimerization of 3-Phenylindene, J.A.C.S. 

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Marvel, C. S. and Stoddard, M. Palmer. A Convenient Synthesis of (//-Glu- 
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Price, Charles C, Arntzen, Clyde E., and Weaver, Clay. The Reaction of 

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Price, Charles C. and Ciskowski, Joseph M. The Alkylation of Naphthalene 

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Price Charles C. and Kroll, Harry. The Kinetics of the Periodate Oxidation 

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Shriner, R. L. and Brown, G. B. Salts of Nitro Compounds. III. The Reaction 

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Shriner, R. L. and Cross, James M. Urethans as Local Anesthetics. IV. Alkyl 

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5 (and 6)-methoxycoumaran-3-one, J.A.C.S. 60, 894. 



Department of Chemistry 135 

Shriner, R. L. and Keyser, Louis S. /3'-Diethylaminoethyl /3-Aminocrotonate, 
J.A.C.S. 60, 286. 

Shriner, R. L., Shotton, James A., and Sutherland, Harry. Anomalous 
Mutarotation of Salts of Reychler's Acid. VI. Synthesis and Structure of 
the Sultam of 2-(N-Methylamino)-d-camphane-10-sulfonic Acid, J.A.C.S. 

60, 2794. 

Shriner, R. L. and Sutherland, Harry. Anomalous Mutarotation of Salts of 
Reychler's Acid. V. Comparison of the Absorption Spectrum of 2-(N- 
Methylimino)-d-camphane-10-sulfonic Acid with the Spectra of other 
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Shriner, R. L. and Teeters, W. O. Substituted Tetrahydronaphthalenes. I. 
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Smith, G. Frederick and Getz, C. A. Cerate Oxidimetry. Evaluation of Solu- 
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Smith, G. Frederick and Getz, C. A. Cerate Oxidimetry. Theoretical Consid- 
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1939 
Adams, Roger and Baker, B. R. Structure of Gossypol. XXI. Synthesis of 

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Adams, Roger and Cairns, T. L. Stereochemistry of Biphenyls. XLVI. 2-Sub- 

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Adams, Roger and Cairns, T. L. Attempts to Prepare Optically Active Ethyl- 

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Adams, Roger and Dial, W. R. Structure of Gossypol. XXII. Gossypol Ethers 

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Adams, Roger and Finger, G. C. Stereochemistry of Biphenyls. XLIX. Com- 
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Adams, Roger and Finger, G. C. Stereochemistry of Biphenyls. XLVII. Certain 

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61, 2182. 

Adams, Roger and Geissman, T. A. Structure of Gossypol. XXIII. Attempts 
to Prepare Desapogossypolone Tetramethyl Ether. Condensation of Hexa- 
diene-2, 4 with Dibenzoylethylene, J.A.C.S. 61, 2083. 

Adams, Roger and Hale, J. B. Stereochemistry of Biphenyls. XLVIII. A Com- 
parison of the Racemization Rates of Three Isomeric 2, 2', 6-Nitro-, 
Carboxy-, Methyl-biphenyls, J.A.C.S. 61, 2825. 

Adams, Roger and Hunt, Madison. Structure of Gossypol. XIX. Synthesis of 
1, 2-Dihydroxy-3-isopropyl-6-benzoic Acid, J.A.C.S. 61, 1132. 

Adams, Roger, Hunt, Madison, and Baker, B. R. Structure of Gossypol. XX. 
Synthesis of 1, 2-Dihydroxy-3-isopropyl-5-benzoic Acid, J.A.C.S. 61, 1134. 



136 University of Illinois 



Adams, Roger, Long, P. H., and Jeanes, Allene. Sulfanilamide Derivatives. II, 

J.A.C.S. 61, 2346. 
Adams, Roger, Long, P. H., and Johanson, A. J. Sulfanilamide Derivatives. I, 

J.A.C.S. 61, 2342. 
Adams, Roger and Rogers, E. F. The Structure of Monocrotaline, the Alkaloid 

in Crotalaria spectabilis and Crotalaria retusa. I, J.A.C.S. 61, 2815. 
Adams, Roger, Rogers, E. F., and Long, R. S. The Structure of Monocrotaline. 

III. Monocrotalic Acid, J.A.C.S. 61, 2822. 
Adams, Roger, Rogers, E. F., and Sprules, F. J. Structure of Monocrotaline. 

II. Monocrotic Acid Obtained by Alkaline Hydrolysis of the Alkaloid, 

J.A.C.S. 61, 2819. 
Audrieth, L. F., Balaty, V. F., and Fellinger, L. L. Acid Catalysis in Liquid 

Ammonia. Ammonolysis of Fatty Oils, Ind. Eng. Chem. 31, 280. 
Audrieth, L. F. and Butler, Sister M. Josetta. Ammonium and Substituted 

Ammonium Sulfamates, J.A.C.S. 61, 914. 
Audrieth, L. F. and Glasoe, Paul F. Acid Catalysis in Amines. I. The 

Catalytic Effect of Cyclohexylammonium Salts on the Reaction Between 

Cyclohexylamine and Esters, J. Org. Chem. 4, 54. 
Audrieth, L. F., Glasoe, Paul K., and Kleinberg, J. Acid Catalysis in Amines. 

II. The Catalytic Effect of Various Butylammonium Salts on the Aminolysis 
of Ethyl Phenylacetate in Anhydrous w-Butylamine, J.A.C.S. 61, 2387. 

Audrieth, L. F., Kleinberg, J., and Taebel, W. A. Sulfamic Acid in the Sepa- 
ration of the Rare Earths, Ind. Eng. Chem., Anal. Ed. 11, 368. 

Audrieth, L. F. and Sisler, H. H. The Preparation of Sulfamic Acid by the 
Hydroxylamine-Sulfur Dioxide Reaction, J.A.C.S. 61, 3389. 

Audrieth, L. F. and Sisler, H. H. The Action of Liquid Ammonia Upon 
Sulfur Trioxide Addition Compounds, J.A.C.S. 61, 3392. 

Bailar, John C, Jr. and McReynolds, J. P. The Stereochemistry of Complex 
Inorganic Compounds. V. The Reaction of Carbonates with Dichloro- 
dipropylenediamine Cobaltic Chloride. A New Method of Determining 
Relative Configurations, J.A.C.S. 61, 3109. 

Bailar, John C, Jr., Stiegman, C. A., Balthis, J. H., Jr., and Huffman, E. H. 
The Stereochemistry of Complex Inorganic Compounds. IV. The Intro- 
duction of Racemic Organic Molecules into Some Optically Active Complex 
Ions of Cobalt and Chromium, J.A.C.S. 61, 2402. 

Bartow, Virginia. Chemical Genealogy, J. Chem. Ed. 16, 236. 

Bradsher, C. K. and Rosher, R. Synthesis of Phenanthrene Derivatives. II. 
9, 10-Disubstituted Hydrocarbons, J.A.C.S. 61, 1524. 

Bradsher, C. K. and Tess, R. W. H. Synthesis of Phenanthrene Derivatives. 

III. 9-Methylphenanthrene, J.A.C.S. 61, 2184. 

Buswell, A. M. Biological Processes Used in the Treatment of Waste, Ind. 

Eng. Chem. 31, 1349. 
Buswell, A. M., Downing, J. R., and Rodebush, W. H. Infrared Absorption 

Studies. IX. Bonding of Hydrogen in Nitrogen Compounds, J.A.C.S. 61, 

3252. 
Buswell, A. M., Gore, R. C, and Rodebush, W. H. Effect of Ions of the 

Lytotropic Series on the Infrared Absorption Spectrum of Water, J. Phys. 

Chem. 43, 1181. 
Buswell, A. M. and Hatfield, W. D. Anaerobic Fermentations, 111. State Water 

Survey, Bulletin 32. 
Buswell, A. M., McMillan, G. W., Rodebush, W. H., and Wall, F. T. Infra- 
red Absorption Studies. VIII. Hydrazoic Acid, J.A.C.S. 61, 2809. 
Buswell, A. M., Maycock, R. L., and Rodebush, W. H. Infrared Absorption of 

Hydrogen Fluoride, J. Chem. Phys. 7 , 857. 
Buswell, A. M. and Rodebush, W. H. Association through Hydrogen, J. Phys. 

Chem. 43, 219. 
Buswell, A. M. and Suter, Max. Removal of Ammonia in Water Treatment, 

Ind. Eng. Chem. 31, 704. 
Carter, H. E. and Handler, Philip. Metabolism of N-Alkyl Derivatives of 

Amino Acids, Proc. Soc. Expt. Biol, and Med. 41, 347. 



Department of Chemistry 137 

Carter, H. E., Handler, Philip, and Melville, D. B. Azlactones. I. Prepara- 
tion of Benzoyl-a-Aminocrotonic Acid Azlactone and the Conversion of 
Allothreonine to Threonine, J. Biol. Chem. 129, 359. 

Clark, George L. X-Ray Structure of Vulcanized Rubber, Ind. Eng. Chem. 31, 
1397. 

Clark, George L. X-Ray Photomicrography, Photo Technique 1, 19. 

Clark, George L., Gross, S. T., and Smith, W. H. X-Ray Diffraction Patterns 
of Crystalline Sol Rubber Prepared from Ethereal Solution, J. Research 
Nat. Bureau Standards 22, 105. 

Clark, George L., Gross, S. T., and Smith, W. H. X-Ray Diffraction Patterns 
of Hevea, Manihot and Other Rubbers, J. Research Nat. Bureau Standards 
23, 1. 

Clark, George L. and Ross, Sydney. On the Measurement of Foam Stability 
with Special Reference to Beer, Wallerstein Laboratories Communications 
on the Sci. and Practice of Brewing 6, 46. 

Clark, George L., Schmitt, F. O., and Bear, R. S. X-Ray Diffraction Studies 
of Nerve Axis Cylinder, Biodynamica 50, 1. 

Clark, George L. and Tyler, W. P. Studies on Lead Oxides. II. Hydrous, 
Normal and Active Lead Monoxides, J.A.C.S. 61, 58. 

Comings, E. W. Thermodynamics for Chemical Engineers, J. Chem. Ed. 16, 312. 

Emerson, W. S. and Davis, J. W. Synthesis in the 1, 2, 3, 4-Tetrahydroquinoline 
Series, J.A.C.S. 61, 2830. 

Emerson, W. S. and Robb, W. D. The Reductive Alkylation of Aromatic Pri- 
mary Amines. II, J.A.C.S. 61, 3145. 

Englis, D. T. and Becker, H. C. Selective Oxidation of Levulose with Potas- 
sium Ferricyanide, Ind. Eng. Chem., Anal. Ed. 11, 145. 

Foster, Laurence S. (I) The Reaction of Gallium with Perchloric Acid and 
(II) the Preparation and Properties of Gallium Perchlorate Hydrates, 
J.A.C.S. 61, 3122. 

Fuson, R. C, Christ, R. E., and Bradsher, C. K. Dihydro-1, 4-pyrans. VI. 
Opening and Closing the Ring, J. Org. Chem. 4, 401. 

Fuson, R. C. and Corse, Joseph. 1, 2-Diarylacetylene Glycols. A New Type of 
Ene-diol, J.A.C.S. 61, 975. 

Fuson, R. C., Corse, Joseph, and Horning, E. C. Esterification of Highly 
Hindered Acids, J.A.C.S. 61, 1290. 

Fuson, R. C, Corse, Joseph, and McKeever, C. H. 1, 2-Diarylacetylene Glycols. 

II. An Enediol from Hexaethylbenzil, J.A.C.S. 61, 2010. 

Fuson, R. C, Emerson, W. S., and Gray, H. W. Arylglyoxals and Steric 
Hindrance, J.A.C.S. 61, 480. 

Fuson, R. C, Emerson, W. S., and Weinstock, H. H., Jr. The Synthesis of 
Mixed Benzoins, J.A.C.S. 61, 412. 

Fuson, R. C, Fisher, C. H., Ullyot, G. E., and Fugate, W. O. Reactions of 
Bromomagnesium Enolates of Mesityl Ketones. I, J. Org. Chem. 4, 111. 

Fuson, R. C, Fugate, W. O., and Fisher, C. H. Reactions of Bromomagnesium 
Enolates of Mesityl Ketones. II. Condensation, J.A.C.S. 61, 2362. 

Fuson, R. C, Gray, Hugh, and Gouza, J. J. Acyloins from /-Butylglyoxal, 
J.A.C.S. 61, 1937. 

Fuson, R. C, McBurney, C. H., and Holland, W. E. 1, 2-Diacylethylene 
Glycols, J.A.C.S. 61, 3246. 

Fuson, R. C, Ross, W. E., and McKeever, C. H. The Condensation of Para- 
formaldehyde with Aromatic Ketones. II. Mesityl Ketones, J.A.C.S. 61, 414. 

Fuson, R. C, Ullyot, G. E., and Hickson, J. L. Benzoylmesitylacetylene, 
J.A.C.S. 61, 410. 

Fuson, R. C. and Wolf, D. E. The Methylation of /3-Ketonitriles, J.A.C.S. 61, 
1940. 

Geissman, T. A. and Mallatt, R. C. The Reaction Between Hexabromobenzene 
and Phenylmagnesium Bromide, J.A.C.S. 61, 1788. 

Hopkins, B S. The Cultural Value of Chemistry in General Education, Centra- 
light 9, 13. 

Hopkins, B S. and Taebel, W. A. Analysis of the Rare Earth Group, Trans. 

III. State Acad. Sci. 31, 136. 



138 University of Illinois 



Johnstone, H. F. and Williams, G. C. Absorption of Gases by Liquid Droplets. 
Design of Simple Spray Scrubbers, Ind. Eng. Chem. 31, 993. 

Keyes, D. B. Research Economics, Am. Paint J. Conv. Daily, page 8, Oct. 27 . 

Marvel, C. S., Copley, M. J., and Ginsberg, Emanuel. Hydrogen Bonding by 
S-H. VII. Aryl Mercaptans, J.A.C.S. 61, 3161. 

Marvel, C. S., Copley, M. J., and Zellhoefer, G. F. Hydrogen Bonds Involving 
the C-H Link. VIII. The Solubilities of Completely Halogenated Methanes 
in Organic Solvents, J.A.C.S. 61, 3550. 

Marvel, C. S. and Cowan, John Charles. The Structure of Vinyl Polymers. 
IV. The Polymers of the Methyl a-Haloacrylates, J.A.C.S. 61, 3156. 

Marvel, C. S. and Dunlap, L. H. Vinyl Chloride Polysulfone, J.A.C.S. 61, 2709. 

Marvel, C. S., Ginsberg, Emanuel, and Mueller, Max B. Effect of Substitu- 
tion on the Dissociation of Hexaarylethanes. VI. Hexa-ra-biphenylethane, 
J.A.C.S. 61, 77. 

Marvel, C. S., Harmon, J., and Riddle, E. H. The Condensation of Acetalde- 
hyde and Vinyl Acetate, J. Org. Chem. 4, 252. 

Marvel, C. S. and Levesque, Charles L. The Structure of Vinyl Polymers. III. 
The Polymer from a-Angelica Lactone, J.A.C.S. 61, 1682. 

Marvel, C. S. and Levesque, Charles L. The Structure of Vinyl Polymers. 
VII. Polyacrylyl Chloride, J.A.C.S. 61, 3244. 

Marvel, C. S. and Levesque, Charles L. Structure of Vinyl Polymers. V. 
Some Reactions of the Polymer of Methyl Vinyl Ketone, J.A.C.S. 61, 3234. 

Marvel, C. S., Mozingo, Ralph, and Kirkpatrick, E. C. Cyclization of Dienynes. 
VII. Dehydrogenation of £ra7w-Dodecahydrophenanthrene and a Further 
Study of trans-3, 4-Dialkyloctalones, J.A.C.S. 61, 2003. 

Marvel, C. S., Mueller, Max B., and Ginsberg, Emanuel. Effect of Substitu- 
tion on the Dissociation of Hexaarylethanes. VII. Meta and Para Phenyl 
Groups, J.A.C.S. 61, 2008. 

Marvel, C. S., Mueller, Max B., Himel, Chas. M., and Kaplan, Julius F. 
The Disproportionation of Hexa-/>-alkylphenylethanes and the Effect of 
ortho-, meta-, and para-A\ky\ Groups on Dissociation of Hexaarylethanes, 
J.A.C.S. 61, 2771. 

Marvel, C. S. and Peppel, W. J. Rearrangements of Tetraaryldiallenes. XII. 
The Synthesis of 2, 8-Diphenyl-chrysene, J.A.C.S. 61, 895. 

Marvel, C. S., Rieger, Wm. H., and Mueller, Max B. Effect of Substitution 
on the Dissociation of Hexaarylethanes. VIII. The Disproportionation of 
Tri-^-tolymethyl, J.A.C.S. 61, 2769. 

Marvel, C. S., Sample, J. H., and Roy, Max F. The Structure of Vinyl Poly- 
mers. VI. Polyvinyl Halides, J.A.C.S. 61, 3241. 

Marvel, C. S. and Sharkey, W. H. Structural Identity of Polysulfones Pre- 
pared by Peroxide Catalysis and Under the Influence of Ultra-violet Light, 
J.A.C.S. 61, 1603. 

Marvel, C. W. and Williams, W. W. Acetylene Polysulfones. XI. The Com- 
pound CioHieSOa from 1-Pentynepolysulfone and Some Experiments on 
Other Acetylenepolysulfones, J.A.C.S. 61, 2710. 

Marvel, C. S. and Williams, W. W. Polysulfones. XII. The Synthesis of 3, 4- 
and 2, 5-Di-w-propyltetrahydrothiophene-l, 1-dioxides, J.A.C.S. 61, 2714. 

Nicholson, D. G. Drying of Linseed Oil Paint. Effect of Pigmentation and 
Aging Upon Rate of Drying, Ind. Eng. Chem. 31, 1300. 

Phipps, T. E. and Johnson, A. A. A Differential Method Applied tojhe Sur- 
face Ionization of Sodium Hallides on Tungsten, J. Chem. Phys. 7 , 1039. 

Phipps, T. E. and Seifert, R. L. E. Evidence of a Periodic Deviation from the 
Schottky Line. I, Phys. Review 56, 652. 

Phipps, T. E. and Turnbull, D. Evidence of a Periodic Deviation from the 
Schottky Line. II, Phys. Review 56, 663. 

Price, Charles C. The Dehydration of fraw.y-2-Methylcyclohexanol, J.A.C.S. 
61, 1847. 

Price, Charles C. and Lewis, F. M. ct-Hydrindone, J.A.C.S. 61, 2553. 

Price, Charles C, Lewis, F. M., and Meister, Morris. The Reaction of the 
Grignard Reagent with Momophthalic Anhydride, J.A.C.S. 61, 2760. 



Department of Chemistry 139 

Price, Charles C. and Meister, Morris. aV-^ran^-Isomerization with Boron 
Fluoride, J.A.C.S. 61, 1595. 

Price, Charles C. and Weaver, Clay. The Reaction of Bromine with Anthra- 
cene in Dioxane, J.A.C.S. 61, 3360. 

Rice, E. E. A Simplified Procedure for the Isolation of Lysine from Protein 
Hydrolysates, J. Biol. Chem. 131, 1. 

Rose, Wm. C. and Eppstein, S. H. The Dietary Indispensability of Valine, 
J. Biol. Chem. 127, 677. 

Rose, Wm. C. and Rice, E. E. The Significance of the Amino Acids in Canine 
Nutrition, Science 90, 186. 

Rose, Wm. C. and Rice, E. E. The Utilization of Certain Sulfur-containing 
Compounds for Growth Purposes, J. Biol. Chem. 130, 305. 

Shriner, R. L. and Anderson, John. Derivatives of Coumaran. VI. Reduc- 
tion of 2-Acetobenzofuran and Its Derivatives, J.A.C.S. 61, 2705. 

Shriner, R. L., Cross, J. M., and Dobratz, E. H. Dialkyl 6u-(Carbethoxy- 
methanesulfonyl) -methanes, J.A.C.S. 61, 2001. 

Shriner, R. L. and Greenlee, S. O. Activity of the Methylene Group in the 
Isomeric Mononitrobenzyl p-To\y\ Sulfones and in 2, 4-Dinitrobenzyl />-Tolyl 
Sulfone, J. Org. Chem. 4, 242. 

Shriner, R. L. and Hickey, J. H. Urethans as Local Anesthetics. V. Alkyl 
y-Diethylaminopropyl-carbamates, J.A.C.S. 61, 888. 

Shriner, R. L., Matson, E. J., and Damschroder, R. E. Derivatives of 
Coumaran. IV. The Structure of Tectorigenin, J.A.C.S. 61, 2322. 

Shriner, R. L. and Moffett, R. B. Halogen Substituted Benzopyrylium Salts, 
J.A.C.S. 61, 1474. 

Shriner, R. L., Oppenlander, J. D., and Schreiber, R. S. Hydrolysis of Sub- 
stituted Benzenesulfonanilides. IV. Solubility of Sulfonanilides in Water 
and Hydrochloric Acid, J. Org. Chem. 4, 588. 

Shriner, R. L., Rendeleman, R. A., and Berger, Arthur. Synthesis of Potas- 
sium and Sodium 3-Hydroxy-l-octanesulfonate, J. Org. Chem. 4, 103. 

Shriner, R. L. and Sharp, A. G. The Action of Alkylmagnesium Halides on 
Coumarin and Related Compounds, Synthesis of 2, 2-Dialkyl-l, 2-Benzo- 
pyrans, J. Org. Chem. 4, 575. 

Shriner, R. L. and Witte, Michael. Derivatives of Coumaran. V. Synthesis 
of 4-Hydroxycoumaran-3-one, J.A.C.S. 61, 2328. 

Smith, G. Frederick and May, R. L. Use of Bromate in Volumetric Analysis: 
VII. Potentiometric Titration of Hydroxyquinoline, J. Am. Ceramic Soc. 
22, 31. 

Snyder, H. R., Cohen, Harry, and Tapp, Wm. J. Reactions of Anils. IV. The 
Reactions of Benzalaniline and Cinnamalaniline with Methyl Acetylenedi- 
carboxylate, J.A.C.S. 61, 3561. 

Snyder, H. R., Hasbrouck, R. B., and Richardson, J. F. Reactions of Anils. 
III. A New Type of Diels-Alder Reaction, J.A.C.S. 61, 3558. 

Snyder, H. R., Kornberg, H. A., and Romig, J. R. Reactions of Anils. II. Addi- 
tion of Methyl Ketones to Benzalaniline in the Presence of Boron Fluoride, 
J.A.C.S. 61, 3556. 

Snyder, H. R. and Speck, J. C. The Cleavage of Benzyldimethylphenyl-am- 
monium Chloride by' Certain Sulfur-Containing Salts: I, J.A.C.S. 61, 668. 

Snyder, H. R. and Speck, J. C. Cleavage of Quaternary Ammonium Salts by 
Sodium Sulfide. II, J.A.C.S. 61, 2895. 

Straub, Frederick G. Purification of Water for Boiler Feed Purposes, J. 
Franklin Inst. 227, 591. 

Straub, Frederick G. and Nelson, E. E. Corrosion in Partially Dry Steam- 
generating Tubes, Mech. Eng. 61, 199. 

Swann, Sherlock, Jr. and Lucker, G. D. The Electrolytic Reduction of 
Benzoic Acid to Benzyl Alcohol, Trans. Electrochem. Soc. 75, 411. 

Taebel, W. A. A Modified Jones Reductor, Ind. Eng. Chem., Anal. Ed. 11, 550. 

Tarbell, D. S. and Weiss, Marvin. The Action of Lithium on an Optically 
Active Aliphatic Chloride, J.A.C.S. 61, 1203. 

Wall, F. T. Infrared Absorption Spectrum of Benzoic Acid, J. Chem. Phys. 7, 
87. 



140 University of Illinois 



Wall, F. T. Ionic Character in Diatomic Molecules, J.A.C.S. 61, 1051. 
Wall, F. T. and Claussen, W. F. Infrared Absorption Spectra of Some 
Carboxylic Acids and of Dibenzoylmethane and Related Molecules, J.A.C.S. 

61, 2812. 

Wall, F. T. and Claussen, W. F. Infrared Absorption Studies of Some Glycols 

and Ethoxyalcohols, J.A.C.S. 61, 2679. 
Wall, F. T. and McMillan, G. W. Infrared Absorption of Phenylmethanes, 

J.A.C.S. 61, 1053. 

1940 
Adams, Roger. Marihuana, Sci. Press 92, 115. 
Adams, Roger and Baker, B. R. Structure of Cannabinol. IV. Synthesis of 

Two Additional Isomers Containing a Resorcinol Residue, J.A.C.S. 62, 2208. 
Adams, Roger and Baker, B. R. Structure of Cannabinol. V. A Second 

Method of Synthesis of Cannabinol, J.A.C.S. 62, 2401. 
Adams, Roger and Baker, B. R. Structure of Cannabidiol. VII. A Method of 

Synthesis of a Tetrahydrocannabinol which Possesses Marihuana Activity, 

J.A.C.S. 62, 2405. 
Adams, Roger, Baker, B. R., and Wearn, R. B. Structure of Cannabinol. III. 

Synthesis of Cannabinol, l-Hydroxy-3-n-amyl-6, 6, 9-trimethyl-6-dibenzo- 

pyran, J.A.C.S. 62, 2204. 
Adams, Roger, Cain, C. K., and Baker, B. R. Structure of Cannabinol. II. 

Synthesis of Two New Isomers, 3-Hydroxy-4-w-amyl- and 3-Hydroxy-2- 

w-amyl 6, 6, 9-trimethyl-6-dibenzopyrans, J.A.C.S. 62, 2201. 
Adams, Roger, Cain, C. K., and Wolff, Hans. Structure of Cannabidiol. II. 

Absorption Spectra Compared with those of Various Dihydric Phenols, 

J.A.C.S. 62, 732. 
Adams, Roger and Dankert, L. J. Restricted Rotation in Arylamines. I. 

Preparation and Resolution of n-Succinyl-n-methylbromomesidine, J.A.C.S. 

62, 2191. 

Adams, Roger and Gold, Marvin H. The Synthesis of 1, 3-Diphenyl-dihydro- 
isobenzofurans, 1, 3-Diphenylisobenzofurans and o-Dibenzoylbenzenes from 
the Diene Addition Products to Dibenzoylethylene, J.A.C.S. 62, 56. 

Adams, Roger and Gold, Marvin H. Absorption and Fluorescence Spectra of 
Certain Dihydroisobenzofurans and Isobenzofurans, J.A.C.S. 62, 2038. 

Adams, Roger, Hunt, Madison, and Clark, J. H. Structure of Cannabidiol, a 
Product Isolated from the Marihuana Extract of Minnesota Wild Hemp. 
I, J.A.C.S. 62, 196. 

Adams, Roger, Hunt, Madison, and Clark, J. H. Structure of Cannabidiol. 
III. Reduction of Cleavage, J.A.C.S. 62, 735. 

Adams, Roger, Loewe, S., Pease, D. C, Cain, C. K., Wearn, R. B., Baker, 
B. R., and Wolff, Hans. Structure of Cannabidiol. VIII. Position of the 
Double Bonds in Cannabidiol. Marihuana Activity of Tetrahydrocannabinols, 
J.A.C.S. 62, 2566. 

Adams, Roger and Long, R. S. Structure of Monocrotaline. IV. Monocrotalic 
Acid, J.A.C.S. 62, 2289. 

Adams, Roger and Miller, M. W. Restricted Rotation in Aryl Olefins. I. 
Preparation and Resolution of /3-Chloro-/3-(2, 4, 6-trimethyl-3-bromo- 
phenyl)-a-methylacrylic Acid, J.A.C.S. 62, 53. 

Adams, Roger, Pease, D. C, Cain, C. K., Baker, B. R., Clark, J. H., Wolff, 
Hans, and Wearn, R. B. Conversion of Cannabidiol to a Product with 
Marihuana Activity. A Type Reaction for Synthesis of Analogous Sub- 
stances. Conversion of Cannabidiol to Cannabinol, J.A.C.S. 62, 2245. 

Adams, Roger, Pease, D. C, Cain, C. K., and Clark, J. H. Structure of Can- 
nabidiol. VI. Isomerization of Cannabidiol to Tetrahydrocannabinol, a 
Physiologically Active Product. Conversion of Cannabidiol to Cannabinol, 
J.A.C.S. 62, 2402. 

Adams, Roger, Pease, D. C, and Clark, J. H. Isolation of Cannabinol, Can- 
nabidiol, and Quebrachitol from Red Oil of Minnesota Wild Hemp, J.A.C.S. 
62, 2194. 



Department of Chemistry 141 

Adams, Roger, Pease, D. C, Clark, J. H., and Baker, B. R. Structure of Can- 

nabinol. I. Preparation of an Isomer, 3-Hydroxyl-l-n-amyl-6, 6,9-tri- 

methyl-6-dibenzopyran, J.A.C.S. 62, 2197. 
Adams, Roger and Teeter, H. M. Stereochemistry of Biphenyls. Comparison 

of the Interference of a Methoxyl and a Hydroxyl Group, J.A.C.S. 62, 2188. 
Adams, Roger and Wearn, R. B. Diene Addition Products to Diaroylethylenes 

and Their Transformation Products. II, J.A.C.S. 62, 1233. 
Adams, Roger, Wolff, Hans, Cain, C. K., and Clark, J. H. Structure of 

Cannabidiol. IV. The Position of the Linkage Between the Two Rings, 

J.A.C.S. 62, 1770. 
Adams, Roger, Wolff, Hans, Cain, C. K., and Clark, J. H. Structure of Can- 
nabidiol. V. Position of the Alicyclic Double Bonds, J.A.C.S. 62, 2215. 
Audrieth, L. F. The Rennaissance of Inorganic Chemistry, The Sci. Teacher 

7, 6. 
Audrieth, L. F., Sveda, M., Sisler, H. H., and Butler, Sister M. Josetta. 

Sulfamic Acid, Sulfamide, and Related Aquo-Ammonosulfuric Acids, Chem. 

Reviews 26, 49. 
Bailar, John C., Jr. and Peppard, D. F. The Stereochemistry of Complex In- 
organic Compounds. VII. The Mechanism of the Walden Inversion in Some 

Reactions Leading to the Formation of the Carbonatodiethylenediamine Co- 

baltic Ion, J.A.C.S. 62, 820. 
Bartow, Virginia. Opportunities for Women in Chemistry, Trans. 111. State 

Acad. Sci. 33, 98. 
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Buswell, A. M. Water Resources in Peoria-Pekin District, 111. State Water 

Survey, Bulletin 33. 
Buswell, A. M., Krebs, Karl F., and Rodebush, W. H. Infrared Absorption 

of Proteins in the 3 At Region. XII, J. Phys. Chem. 44, 1126. 
Buswell, A. M. and Larson, T. E. Collected Papers on Water Softening, 111. 

State Water Survey, Circular 21. 
Buswell, A. M. and Suter, Max. A Study of Floe-Forming Organisms in 

Chlorinated Water Supplies, J. Bacteriol. 39, 583. 
Carter, H. E. />-Phenylphenacyl Esters, J.A.C.S. 62, 2244. 
Carter, H. E. and Melville, Donald B. Synthesis and Determination of the 

Lipotropic Activity of the Betaine Hydrochlorides of (//-Serine, ^/-Threo- 
nine, and d/-Allothreonine, J. Biol. Chem. 133, 109. 
Carter, H. E. and Stevens, Carl M. Azlactones. II. Azlactone Formation 

in Glacial and in Aqueous Acetic Acid and Preparation of Benzoyl-a-Amino- 

crotonic Acid Azlactone. II, J. Biol. Chem. 133, 117. 
Clark, George L. The Downfall of the Sanctity of the Molecule, The Science 

Teacher 7, 1, 29, 30; 4, 22, 30. 
Clark, George L., Bradley, W. F., and Azbe, V. J. Problems in Lime Burning. 

A New X-Ray Approach, Ind. Eng. Chem. 32, 972. 
Clark, George L., Gross, S. T., and Ritter, G. J. Arrangement of the Cellu- 
lose Crystallites in Ray Cells of White Oak as Determined by X-Rays, 

Paper Trade J. 109, 37. 
Clark, George L., Kabler, Marian, Blaker, Ernest, and Ball, John M. 

Hysteresis in Crystallization of Stretched Vulcanized Rubber from X-Ray 

Data. Correlation with Stress-Strain Behavior and Resilience, Ind. Eng. 

Chem. 32, 1474. 
Clark, George L. and Rhodes, H. D. Practical Evaluation of Commercial 

Rubber Carbon Blacks by X-Ray Diffraction, Ind. Eng. Chem., Anal. Ed. 

12, 66. 
i Clark, George L. and Robinson, J. V. A Study of Monolayers of Some Esters 

and Chlorinated Derivatives Possibly Useful as Lubricating Addition Agents, 

J.A.C.S. 62, 1948. 
Clark, George L. and Ross, S. Measurement of Static and Dynamic Foams in 

Characteristic Units, Ind. Eng. Chem. 32, 1594. 
, Clark, George L. and Shafer, W. M. The Technique of Microradiography and 

Its Application to Metals, Trans. Am. Soc. for Metals, Preprint No. 21. 



142 University of Illinois 



Clark, George L. and Shafer, W. M. Quantitative Evaluation of Distortion in 
Silicon Steel and in Aluminum, Trans. Am. Soc. for Metals, Preprint No. 22. 

Comings, E. W. Thickening Calcium Carbonate Slurries, Ind. Eng. Chem. 32, 
663. 

Comings, E. W. English Engineering Units and Their Dimensions, Ind. Eng. 
Chem. 32, 984. 

Comings, E. W. and Egly, R. S. Viscosity of Gases and Vapors at High Pres- 
sures, Ind. Eng. Chem. 32, 714. 

Emerson, Wm. S., Dorf, F. B., and Deutschman, A. J., Jr. The Activation 
of Aromatic Halogen by ortho Ammonium Salt Groups, J.A.C.S. 62, 2159. 

Emerson, Wm. S. and Mohrman, H. W. Secondary Amines from Nitro 
Compounds, J.A.C.S. 62, 69. 

Emerson, Wm. S. and Uhle, F. C. Benzol-2,4,6-Tribromoaniline, J.A.C.S. 62, 
1880. 

Englis, D. T. and Keirs, R. J. Solution Method for Spectrograph^ Analysis, 
Ind. Eng. Chem., Anal. Ed. 12, 275. 

Englis, D. T. and Shannon, W. J. Copper in Tomatoes, J. Assoc, of Official 
Agr. Chemists 23, 679. 

Englis, D. T. and Tanner, Louise P. A Study of Starch from Different Varie- 
ties and Types of Corn, Food Research 5, 563. 

Fuson, R. C. and Cooke, H. G., Jr. The Synthesis of Certain Carbalkoxy- 
stilbenes, J.A.C.S. 62, 1180. 

Fuson, R. C, Corse, Joseph, and McKeever, C. H. A Stable Vinyl Alcohol. 
1-2-Dimesityl-l-propen-l-ol, J.A.C.S. 62, 3250. 

Fuson, R. C. and Horning, E. C. Enediols. V. Hexaisopropylstilbenediols, 
J.A.C.S. 62, 2962. 

Fuson, R. C. and McKeever, C. H. Chloromethylation of Aryl Ketones, J.A.C.S. 
62, 784. 

Fuson, R. C. and McKeever, C. H. The Condensation of Paraformaldehyde with 
Acetomesitylene, J.A.C.S. 62, 999. 

Fuson, R. C. and McKeever, C. H. The Trimerization of Vinyl Mesityl Ketone, 
J.A.C.S. 62, 2091. 

Fuson, R. C. and McKeever, C. H. Enediols. IV. cis-trans Isomerism, J.A.C.S. 
62, 2088. 

Fuson, R. C, McKeever, C. H., and Corse, Joseph. Enediols. III. 1,2-Dimesityl- 
acetylene Glycol, J.A.C.S. 62, 600. 

Fuson, R. C. and Robinson, John W. l-4-Dibromo-l-4-dipivalylbutane, J.A.C.S. 
62, 358. 

Hopkins, B S. and Taebel, W. A. Chemistry of Europium, Trans. 111. State 
Acad. Sci. 32, 132. 

Johnstone, H. F. Liquid-Gas Contactors, Chem. Met. Eng. 47, 322. 

Johnstone, H. F. and Singh, A. D. Recovery of Sulfur Dioxide from Waste 
Gases. Regeneration of the Absorbent by Treatment with Zinc Oxide, Ind. 
Eng. Chem. 32, 1037. 

Johnstone, H. F. and Singh, A. D. The Recovery of Sulfur Dioxide from 
Dilute Waste Gases by Chemical Regeneration of the Absorbent, Univ. of 111. 
Eng. Expt. Sta., Bulletin 324, Vol. 38. 

Johnstone, H. F., Spoor, I. H., and Goss, W. H. Properties of Soybean Oil- 
Solvent Mixtures, Ind. Eng. Chem. 32, 832. 

Keyes, D. B. Chemical Engineering, Technograph 5, Oct. 

Keyes, D. B., Bonnell, W. S., and Byman, L. Surface Tension of Ethyl Alco- 
hol-Water Mixtures, Ind. Eng. Chem. 32, 532. 

Marvel, C. S. and Cooke, H. G., Jr. Structure of Vinyl Polymers, Review of 
Chem. Prog. 1, 1. 

Marvel, C. S., Copley, M. J., and Ginsberg, Emanuel. Hydrogen Bonds In- 
volving the C-H Link. XI. Effect of Structure on Bonding of Donor and 
Acceptor Molecules, J.A.C.S. 62, 3109. 

Marvel, C. S., Copley, M. J., and Ginsberg, Emanuel. Hydrogen Bonds 
Involving the C-H ^ F Link. XII, J.A.C.S. 62, 3263. 



Department of Chemistry 143 

Marvel, C. S., Zellhoefer, G. F., and Copley, M. J. Hydrogen Bonds Involving 
the C-H Link. IX. Nitriles and Dinitriles as Solvents for Hydrogen Con- 
taining Halogenated Methanes, J.A.C.S. 62, 227. 

Marvel, C. S., Dec, Joseph, and Cooke, H. G., Jr. Optically Active Polymers 
from Active Vinyl Esters. A Convenient Method of Studying the Kinetics of 
Polymerization, J.A.C.S. 62, 3499. 

Marvel, C. S., Dec, Joseph, Cooke, H. G., Jr., and Cowan, J. C. Polymers of 
the a-Haloacrylic Acids and Their Derivatives, J.A.C.S. 62, 3495. 

Marvel, C. S., Dietz, Frederick C, and Copley, M. J. Hydrogen Bonds Involv- 
ing the C-H Link. X. The Solubility of Donor Solutes in Halogenated Hy- 
drocarbons, J.A.C.S. 62, 2273. 

Marvel, C. S. and Himel, Chester M. Hexa-/>-alkylphenylethanes. X. p-Cyc\o- 
hexyl Derivatives of Hexaphenylethane, J.A.C.S. 62, 1550. 

Marvel, C. S. and Moon, Neil S. The Structure of Vinyl Polymers. VIII. 
Polystyrene and Some of Its Derivatives, J.A.C.S. 62, 45. 

Marvel, C. S., Mozingo, Ralph, and White, Ralph. Acetylenic Cyclohexane 
Derivatives, J.A.C.S. 62, 1880. 

Marvel, C. S., Pearson, D. E., and Patterson, L. A. Cyclization of Dienynes. 
VIII. Ring Closures with Alpha and Beta Cyclohexenylacetylene Deriva- 
tives of Octalin, J.A.C.S. 62, 2659. 

Marvel, C. S., Pearson, D. E., and White, Ralph. Cyclization of Dienynes. 
X. The Dodecahydrophenanthrone Obtained from Dicyclohexenylacetylene, 
J.A.C.S. 62, 2741. 

Marvel, C. S. and Riddle, E. H. The Structure of Vinyl Polymers. IX. Cata- 
lysts, J.A.C.S. 62, 2666. 

Marvel, C. S. and White, Ralph. Synthesis of a New Perhydro-9-Phenan- 
throne, J.A.C.S. 62, 2739. 

Moeller, Therald. Contributions to the Chemistry of Indium. I. Indium 
Oxalate and Oxalatoindates, J.A.C.S. 62, 2444. 

Moeller, Therald. Modified Atomic Volume Plots, J. Chem. Ed. 17, 441. 

Moeller, Therald. Some Interesting Examples of Rhythmic Precipitation, 
J. Chem. Ed. 17, 519. 

Nicholson, D. G. Drying of Linseed Oil Paint. Effect of Acidity Upon Rate 
of Oxygen Absorption, Ind. Eng. Chem. 32, 1259. 

Nicholson, D. G. and Matheson, A. R. Bleaching of White Lead Paint Films 
Darkened by Hydrogen Sulfide, Paint, Oil, and Chem. Review 102, No. 7, 44. 

Nicholson, D. G. and Matheson, A. R. Bleaching of Lead Pigments After 
Darkening by Exposure to Hydrogen Sulfide, Paint, Oil, and Chem. Review 
102, No. 18, 9. 

Price, Charles C. 6-methyl-5-Nitro-2-Naphthoic Acid, J.A.C.S. 62, 2245. 

Price, Charles C. 7, y'-Di-/>-Tolyl-y, y'-Suberodilactone, J.A.C.S. 62. 2884. 

Price, Charles C. and Coyner, Eugene C. The Addition of Hydrogen Bro- 
mide to Methyl Methacrylate, J.A.C.S. 62, 1306. 

Price, Charles C. and Karabinos, Joseph V. The Dehydration of cis- and 
/rrt/Ls--2-Phenylcyclohexanols, J.A.C.S. 62, 1159. 

Price, Charles C. and Karabinos, Joseph V. 4-Phenylcyclohexane, J.A.C.S. 
62, 2243. 

Price, Charles C. and Lund, Marion. The Alkylation of Benzene with d-s- 
Butyl Alcohol, J.A.C.S. 62, 3105. 

Price, Charles C. and Schwarcz, Morton. The Chlorination of cis- and trans- 
Diethyl Hexahydrophthalates, J.A.C.S. 62, 2891. 

Reedy, J. H. and Preising, Sister M. Joan. The Detection of Oxy-Halogen 
Anions, Trans. 111. State Acad. Sci. 33, 123. 

Rodebush, W. H., Buswell, A. M., and Downing, J. R. Infrared Absorption 
Studies. XI. NH-N and NH-0 Bonds, J.A.C.S. 62, 2759. 

Rodebush, W. H., Buswell, A. M., and Maycock, R. L. Infrared Absorption 
Studies. X. The Infrared Absorption of Hydrogen Fluoride in the Vapor 
State and in Solution in an Inert Solvent, J. Chem. Phys. 8, 362. 

Rodebush, W. H. and Eddy, C. R. Dielectric Polarization in Solution. I. The 
Failure of the Clausins-Mosotti Equation, J. Chem. Phys. 8, 424. 



144 University of Illinois 



Rodebush, W. H., Eddy, C. R., and Eubank, L. D. Dielectric Polarization in 

Solution. II. The Polarization of Some Alcohols as a Function of Con- 
centration and Temperature, J. Chem. Phys. 8, 889. 
Rodebush, W. H. and O'Shaughnessy, M. T. Ultraviolet Absorption Spectra 

of Organic Molecules: The Dependence Upon Restricted Rotation and 

Resonance, J.A.C.S. 62, 2906. 
Shriner, R. L. and Keyser, Louis S. 3-(/>-Dimethylaminobenzal)-6-Nitrophthal- 

ide and 3-(/>-Dimethylaminobenzyl)-6-Aminophthalide, J. Org. Chem. 5, 200. 
Shriner, R. L. andMoFFETT, Robert B. Benzopyrylium Salts. II. Ozonization, 

J.A.C.S. 62, 2711. 
Shriner, R. L. and Sharp, A. G. Derivatives of Methacrolein, J.A.C.S. 62, 2245. 
Shriner, R. L. and Snyder, H. R. An Efficient Fractional Distillation Column, 

J. Chem. Ed. 17, 588. 
Smith, G. Frederick, Frank, Gerald, and Kott, A. E. Cerate Oxidimetry. 

Electrolytic Oxidation of Cerium without the Use of Diaphragm Cell, Ind. 

Eng. Chem., Anal. Ed. 12, 268. 
Smith, G. Frederick and Getz, C. A. Cerate Oxidimetry. Preparation and 

Stability of Solutions, Ind. Eng. Chem., Anal. Ed. 12, 339. 
Straub, Frederick G. Boiler Feed Water Treatment — 1930-1940, Power Plant 

Eng. 44, 65. 
Straub, Frederick G. New Trends in Boiler Feed Water Treatment, Trans. 

Am. Inst. Chem. Eng. 36, 395. 
Straub, Frederick G. New Trends in Boiler Feed Water Treatment, Chem. 

Met. Eng. 47, 477. 
Straub, Frederick G. New Trends in Boiler Feed Water Treatment, Eng. Expt. 

Sta. 20, 395. 
Straub, Frederick G. New Trends in Boiler Feed Water Treatment, Canadian 

Transportation, Dec, 618. 
Straub, Frederick G. and Nelson, E. E. A New Degasifying Condenser for 

Use in Conductivity Determinations, Am. Soc. Mech. Eng., Preprint No. 26. 
Swann, Sherlock, Jr. Electro-Organic Chem. Preparations. II, Trans. Elec- 

trochem. Soc. 77, 459. 
Swann, Sherlock, Jr. and Kearby, K. Aerogel Catalysts. Dehydrations and 

Decarboxylations, Ind. Eng. Chem. 32, 1607. 
Taebel, W. A. A Weighing Bottle, Ind. Eng. Chem., Anal. Ed. 12, 141. 
Wall, Frederick T. Ionic Character and Dipole Moments, J.A.C.S. 62, 800. 
Wall, Frederick T. Removal of Substituents from Vinyl Polymers, J.A.C.S. 62, 

803. 
Wall, Frederick T. and Holley, C. E., Jr. Thermal Diffusion Separation of 

Different Gases of the Same Molecular Weight, J. Chem. Phys. 8, 348. 
Wall, Frederick T. and Holley, C. E., Jr. Separation by Thermal Diffusion 

of Mixtures of Gases Having the Same Molecular Weight, J. Chem. Phys. 

8, 949. 
Wall, Frederick T. and McMillan, G. W. Infrared Absorption Studies of 

Some Hydrocarbons, J.A.C.S. 62, 2225. 



DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY DEGREES 
IN CHEMISTRY 

The University of Illinois awarded its first Doctor of Philosophy 
degree in Chemistry in 1903. From that time until June 1941, a total 
of six hundred and twenty-one such degrees have been conferred. The 
recipients of these degrees are listed below. 

Class of 1903 
Dehn, William Maurice, Department of Chemistry, University of Washington, 
Seattle, Washington. 

Class of 1906 
Scovell, Melville Amasa, Deceased. 
Trowbridge, Perry Fox, Deceased. 

Class of 1907 

East, Edward Murray, Deceased. 

Class of 1910 

Derick, Clarence George, Cliff Road, Sewaren, New Jersey. 

Ernest, Thomas Reuben, Department of Physical Science, Woodrow Wilson 
Junior College, Chicago, Illinois. 

Homberger, Alfred William, Department of Chemistry, University of Louis- 
ville, Louisville, Kentucky. 

Howe, Paul Edward, United States Bureau of Animal Industry, Washington, 
D. C. Now on leave: Sanitary Corps, Surgeon General's Office, U. S. Army, 
Washington, D. C. 

Kostalek, John Anton, Deceased. 

Mattill, Henry Albright, Department of Biochemistry, State University of 
Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa. 

Class of 1911 

Burke, Charles Eldrid, Department of Chemistry, McMaster University, Ham- 
ilton, Ontario, Canada. 

MacInnes, Duncan Arthur, Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research, New 
York, New York. 

Class of 1912 

Bates, Stuart Jeffery, Department of Chemistry, California Institute of Tech- 
nology, Pasadena, California. 

Egan, James Everett, The Proctor and Gamble Company, Port Ivory, Staten 
Island, New York. 

Gordon, Hugh Byron, Johns-Manville Corporation, Bound Brook, New Jersey. 

Littleton, Leonidas Rosser, Department of Chemistry, Emory and Henry Col- 
lege, Emory, Virginia. 

Ross, Ellison Lloyd, Deceased. 

Strachan, Earle Kenneth, Deceased. 

Class of 1913 

Bell, James Edgar, Department of Chemistry, California Institute of Tech- 
nology, Pasadena, California. 

Nickell, Lloyd Francis, Monsanto Chemicals, Limited, London, England. 

Potter, Ralph Sydney, Deceased. 

Williams, Guy Yandall, Department of Chemistry, University of Oklahoma, 
Norman, Oklahoma. 

Class of 1914 

Hadley, Harry Fielding, North Salem, Indiana. 

Heuse, Edward Otto, Department of Chemistry, Southern Methodist University, 
Dallas, Texas. 

145 



146 University of Illinois 



McGregor, Harold Hassock, Deceased. 

Millard, Earl Bowman, Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of 

Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts. 
Olin, Hubert Leonard, Department of Chemistry, State University of Iowa, 

Iowa City, Iowa. 
Sears, George Wallace, Department of Chemistry, University of Nevada, Reno, 

Nevada. 

Class of 1915 
Corson, Harry Peach, Grasselli Chemicals Department, E. I. du Pont de 

Nemours and Company, Incorporated, Wilmington, Delaware. 
Harder, Oscar Edward, Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus, Ohio. 
Howard, Joseph Whitney, Department of Chemistry, Montana State University, 

Missoula, Montana. 
Kamm, Oliver, Parke-Davis and Company, Detroit, Michigan. 
Mitchell, Harold Hanson, Department of Animal Nutrition, University of 

Illinois, Urbana, Illinois. 
Muncie, Fred Weaver, R.F.D. 2, Putnam, Connecticut. 

Class of 1916 
Ball, Theodore Rolly, Department of Chemistry, Washington University, St. 

Louis, Missouri. 
Brady, St. Elmo, Fisk University, Nashville, Tennessee. 
Clark, Karl Adolf, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. 
Dean, Paul Marshall, Department of Chemistry, University of Colorado, 

Boulder, Colorado. 
Engle, Edgar Wallace, Carbaloy Corporation, Detroit, Michigan. 
Englis, Duane Taylor, Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois, 

Urbana, Illinois. 
Hess, Raymond Washington, National Aniline and Chemical Company, Buffalo, 

New York. 
Layng, Thomas Ernest, Container Corporation of America, Chicago, Illinois. 
Lewis, Harry Fletcher, Institute of Paper Chemistry, Appleton, Wisconsin. 
Mohlman, Floyd William, Sanitary District of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois. 
Parr, Rosalie Mary, Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois, Urbana, 

Illinois. 
Ross, John Carl, Transvaal University College, Pretoria, South Africa. 
Scholl, Clarence E., Sanitation Department, City of Indianapolis, Indianapolis, 

Indiana. 
Tanner, Fred Wilbur, Department of Bacteriology, University of Illinois, 

Urbana, Illinois. 

Class of 1917 
Braley, Silas Alonzo, Pittsburgh Steel Company, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 
Chandler, Edward Marion Augustus, 828 Tenth Street, Waukegan, Illinois. 
Geiling, Eugene Maximilian Karl, Department of Pharmacology, University of 

Chicago, Chicago, Illinois. 
Knight, Henry Granger, United States Department of Agriculture, Washing- 
ton, D. C. 
Kremers, Harry Cleveland, Harshaw Chemical Company, Cleveland, Ohio. 
Skinner, Glenn Seymour, Department of Chemistry, University of Delaware, 

Newark, Delaware. 
Weiland, Henry Joseph, Organic Chemicals Division, E. I. du Pont de Nemours 

and Company, Incorporated, Wilmington, Delaware. 
Wichers, Edward, Bureau of Standards, Washington, D. C. 

Class of 1918 
Braham, Joseph Marvin, Solvay Process Company, New York, New York. 
Charlton, Ernest Edward, General Electric Company, Schenectady, New York. 
Ford, Jay Thomas, A-C Spark Plug Division, General Motors Corporation, 

Detroit, Michigan. 
Hatfield, William Durrell, Sanitary District, Decatur, Illinois. 
Hicks, John Frederick Gross, Deceased. 






Department of Chemistry 147 

Okey, Ruth Eliza, Department of Home Economics, University of California, 

Berkeley, California. 
Owens, Albert Waffle, United States Smelting, Refining, and Mining Company, 

Cambridge, Massachusetts. 
Powell, Alfred Richard, The Koppers Company, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 
Rees, Edwin Arthur, F. C. Huyck and Company, Albany, New York. 
Rowland, Floyd Elba, Massachusetts Corporation, Boston, Massachusetts. 
Volwiler, Ernest Henry, Abbott Laboratories, North Chicago, Illinois. 
Westhafer, Terrance Onas, Western Electric Company, Chicago, Illinois. 

Class of 1919 

Colver, Charles William, Department of Chemistry, Kansas State College, 

Manhattan, Kansas. 
Howell, Lloyd Brelsford, Department of Chemistry, Wabash College, Craw- 

fordsville, Indiana. 
Rindfusz, Ralph Emerson, 10 East 40th Street, New York, New York. 
Smith, Otto Mitchell, Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, 

Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechanical College, Stillwater, Oklahoma. 
Stearn, Allen Edwin, Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri, 

Columbia, Missouri. 
Wells, Lansing Sadler, Bureau of Standards, Washington, D. C. 
Winkelmann, Herbert August, Dryden Rubber Company, Chicago, Illinois. 

Class of 1920 

Austin, Miner Manly, Deceased. 

French, Herbert Ephraim, Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri, 
Columbia, Missouri. 

Hufferd, Ralph William, Kendall Refining Company, Bradford, Pennsylvania. 

Marvel, Carl Shipp, Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois, Urbana, 
Illinois. 

Merling, Ruth Evelyn, Eastman Kodak Company, Rochester, New York. 

Powell, Sargent Gastman, Department of Chemistry, University of Washing- 
ton, Seattle, Washington. 

Ulich, Lynne Herman, Jackson Laboratory, E. I. du Pont de Nemours and 
Company, Incorporated, Wilmington, Delaware. 

Van Winkle, William Alexander, Department of Chemistry, Kansas State 
College, Manhattan, Kansas. 

Class of 1921 

Bradley, Manson James, Leeds and Northrup Company, Germantown, Pennsyl- 
vania. 

Brown, John Bernis, Department of Physiological Chemistry, Ohio State Uni- 
versity, Columbus, Ohio. 

Coleman, George Hopkins, Department of Chemistry, State University of Iowa, 
Iowa City, Iowa. 

Dunn, Max Shaw, Department of Chemistry, University of California at Los 
Angeles, Los Angeles, California. 

Greenfield, Robert Edman, A. E. Staley Manufacturing Company, Decatur, 
Illinois. 

Gunton, John Aberdeen, Department of Chemistry, University of Western 
Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada. 

Yntema, Leonard Francis, Department of Chemistry, School of Medicine, St. 
Louis University, St. Louis, Missouri. 

Class of 1922 
Barnes, Otis Avery, Department of Chemistry, Colorado College, Colorado 

Springs, Colorado. 
Bosman, Vernon, South African Iron and Steel Industrial Corporation, Limited, 

Johannesburg, South Africa. 
Chiles, Howard Marion, Central Illinois Testing Laboratory, Springfield, Illinois. 
Christman, Adam Arthur, Department of Physiological Chemistry, School of 

Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan. 



148 University of Illinois 



Engle, Earl Agard, Department of Chemistry, University of Denver, Denver, 
Colorado. 

Ginnings, Paul Meade, Department of Chemistry and Physics, Greensboro Col- 
lege, Greensboro, North Carolina. 

Hall, Joseph Lowe, Department of Chemistry, Kansas State College, Manhattan, 
Kansas. 

Ingersoll, Arthur William, Department of Chemistry, Vanderbilt University, 
Nashville, Tennessee. 

Johnson, John Raven, Department of Chemistry, Cornell University, Ithaca, 
New York. 

Langley, Wilson Davis, Department of Chemistry, School of Medicine, Uni- 
versity of Buffalo, Buffalo, New York. 

Libman, Earl Emanuel, General Electric Company, Schenectady, New York. 

Lochte, Harry Louis, Department of Chemistry, University of Texas, Austin, 
Texas. 

Palmer, Charles Shattuck, 1115 California Avenue, Urbana, Illinois. 

Quick, Armand James, Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Mar- 
quette University, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 

Schneider, Ralph Fred, Sherwin-Williams Company, Chicago, Illinois. 

Shelton, George Reed, Bureau of Standards, Washington, D. C. 

Wildman, Ernest Atkins, Department of Chemistry, Earlham College, Rich- 
mond, Indiana. 

Wilson, William Courtney, Pyroxylin Products, Incorporated, Chicago, Illinois. 

Class of 1923 

Bartow, Virginia, Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois, Urbana, 

Illinois. 
Bauer, William Wert, Pittsburgh Plate Glass Company, Milwaukee, Wisconsin. 
Burnett, Waldo Briggs, Tubize Chatillon Corporation, Rome, Georgia. 
Edwards, Gail Phillips, New York City Department of Public Works, New 

York, New York. 
Fogler, Mayor Farthing, Solvay Process Company, Hopewell, Virginia. 
Gardner, John Hall, Department of Chemistry, Washington University, St. 

Louis, Missouri. 
Goebel, Walter Frederick, Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research, New 

York, New York. 
Graves, George DeWitt, Nylon Division, E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Com- 
pany, Incorporated, Wilmington, Delaware. 
Griffith, Wendell Horace, Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, 

St. Louis University, St. Louis, Missouri. 
Jenkins, Russell Lewis, Phosphorus Division, Monsanto Chemical Company, 

Anniston, Alabama. 
Kaufmann, Ralph Jennings, Department of Chemistry, University of Tulsa, 

Tulsa, Oklahoma. 
Kaufmann, Wilford Edward, Department of Chemistry, Alma College, Alma, 

Michigan. 
McElvain, Samuel Marion, Department of Chemistry, University of Wisconsin, 

Madison, Wisconsin. 
Navias, Louis, General Electric Company, Schenectady, New York. 
Ogden, Katharine, Liggett School, Detroit, Michigan. 
Peet, Charles Heman, Deceased. 
Porter, Philip Kelsey, Mellon Institute of Industrial Research, Pittsburgh, 

Pennsylvania. 
Wilson, Thomas Adam, Mellon Institute of Industrial Research, Pittsburgh, 

Pennsylvania. 
Yancey, Harry Fagan, United States Bureau of Mines, Seattle, Washington. 

Class of 1924 

Andrews, John Wendell, Deceased. 

Calvery, Herbert Orion, United States Food and Drug Administration, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 
Carothers, Wallace Hume, Deceased. 






Department of Chemistry 149 

Corley, Ralph Conner, Department of Chemistry, Purdue University, Lafayette, 

Indiana. 
Dreger, Emil Edward, Colgate-Palmolive-Peet Company, Jersey City, New 

Jersey. 
Driggs, Frank Howard, Fansteel Metallurgical Corporation, North Chicago, 

Illinois. 
Gallaher, William Uren, Appleton Water Works, Appleton, Wisconsin. 
Heckel, Hermann Conrad Nies, Champion Paper and Fiber Company, Hamil- 
ton, Ohio. 
Hill, Robert McClaughry, Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, 

University of Colorado, Denver, Colorado. 
Koten, Irvin Alvin, Department of Chemistry, North Central College, Naper- 

ville, Illinois. 
Lougee, Flora Marion, Department of Chemistry, Keuka College, Keuka Park, 

New York. 
Moose, Joe Eugene, Phosphorus Division, Monsanto Chemical Company, Annis- 

ton, Alabama. 
Munn, Lottie Ella, Department of Chemistry, Lake Erie College, Painesville, 

Ohio. 
Pierce, John Stanton, Department of Chemistry, University of Richmond, 

Richmond, Virginia. 
Rassweiler, Clifford Fred, Johns-Manville Corporation, Manville, New Jersey. 
Uyei, Nao, Hormone Research Institute No. 1 Omiya-Cho, Kawasaki-Shi, 

Japan. 
Wood, Lyman Joy, Department of Chemistry, School of Medicine, St. Louis 

University, St. Louis, Missouri. 

Class of 1925 

Brode, Wallace Reed, Department of Chemistry, Ohio State University, Colum- 
bus, Ohio. 

Butler, Courtland Livingston, Jr., Department of Chemistry, Bennington Col- 
lege, Bennington, Vermont. 

Cox, Gerald Judy, Mellon Institute of Industrial Research, Pittsburgh, Penn- 
sylvania. 

Gray, Archibald Edmund, American Consulate, Barcelona, Spain. 

Hovorka, Frank, Department of Chemistry, Western Reserve University, Cleve- 
land, Ohio. 

Hyde, Elizabeth Charlotte, Department of Chemistry, Wells College, Aurora- 
on-Cayuga, New York. 

Jackson, Richard Willet, Eastern Regional Research Laboratory, United States 
Department of Agriculture, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Jacobson, Ralph Albert, Experimental Station, E. I. du Pont de Nemours and 
Company, Incorporated, Wilmington, Delaware. 

Kern, John Williams, Lisha Kill Road, Schenectady, New York. 

Li, Sheo Hen, College of Engineering, University of Chekiang, Hang Chow, 
China. 

North, Edward Oscar, Department of Chemistry, University of North Dakota, 
Grand Forks, North Dakota. 

Rodewald, Charles William, Department of Chemistry, Washington Univer- 
sity, St. Louis, Missouri. 

Shive, Roy Allen, Calco Chemical Division, American Cyanamid Company, 
Bound Brook, New Jersey. 

Shriner, Ralph Lloyd, Department of Chemistry, Indiana University, Bloom- 
ington, Indiana. 

Stouder, Florence Dell (Mrs. Florence S. Powers), 84 Hillside Avenue, Cald- 
well, New Jersey. 

Thompson, Alfred Paul, Mellon Institute of Industrial Research, Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania. 

Vandaveer, Frederick Ewart, American Gas Association Testing Laboratories, 
Cleveland, Ohio. 

Wierda, John, Long Island City High School, Queens, New York. 



150 University of Illinois 



Class of 1926 

Fiock, Ernest Franklin, Bureau of Standards, Washington, D. C. 

Godlove, Isaac Hahn, Organic Chemicals Department, E. I. du Pont de 
Nemours and Company, Incorporated, Wilmington, Delaware. 

Hager, Floyd David, Antitoxin and Vaccine Laboratory, Jamaica Plain, Boston, 
Massachusetts. 

Harris, Joseph Allen, Department of Chemistry, University of British Colum- 
bia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. 

Hiers, Glen Sefton, Collins and Aikman Corporation, Philadelphia, Pennsyl- 
vania. 

Holton, William Bultman, Department of Chemistry, American University, 
Washington, D. C. 

Kendall, Forrest Everett, New York City Department of Hospitals, New York, 
New York. 

McGregor, Rob Roy, Mellon Institute of Industrial Research, Pittsburgh, Penn- 
sylvania. 

Noller, Carl Robert, Department of Chemistry, Leland Stanford University, 
Stanford University, California. 

Puntambeker, Shripati Venkatesh, Chemical Branch, Forest Research Insti- 
tute, Dehro Dun, India. 

Rippie, Charles William, Solvay Sales Corporation, St. Louis, Missouri. 

Sacks, Jacob, Department of Pharmacology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, 
Michigan. 

Stover, Norman McKee, Deceased. 

Strickhouser, Sherman Israel, United States Rubber Products, Incorporated, 
Providence, Rhode Island. 

Taylor, John Bradshaw, Deceased. 

Tomecko, Cyprian George, Deceased. 

Tuley, William Feagan, Naugatuck Chemical Division, United States Rubber 
Company, New York, New York. 

Tumminkatti, Muppana Chanavirappa (Katti, Muppanna, C. T.), Karnatak 
Chemical Works, Gadag, India. 

Class of 1927 

Bateman, Dorothy Emma (Mrs. John Maney), Wilmington, Delaware. 

Boss, Arthur Evan, Columbia Chemical Division, Pittsburgh Plate Glass Com- 
pany, New York, New York. 

Brubaker, Merlin Martin, Experimental Station, E. I. du Pont de Nemours 
and Company, Incorporated, Wilmington, Delaware. 

Bunney, William Edward, Biologic Products, E. R. Squibb and Sons, New 
Brunswick, New Jersey. 

Coffman, Alden Williams, H. H. Robertson Company, Mt. Lebanon, Pennsyl- 
vania. 

DeVries, Thomas, Department of Chemistry, Purdue University, Lafayette, 
Indiana. 

Dixon, Alfred Leonard, Western Electric Company, Chicago, Illinois. 

Kleinheksel, J. Harvey, Department of Chemistry, Hope College, Holland, 
Michigan. 

Michalek, John Clarke, Mathieson Alkali Works, Incorporated, Niagara Falls, 
New York. 

Neckers, James Winfred, Department of Chemistry, Southern Illinois State 
Normal University, Carbondale, Illinois. 

Partridge, Edward Graffam, The B. F. Goodrich Company, Akron, Ohio. 

Peterson, John Merriam, Hercules Powder Company, Wilmington, Delaware. 

Sandborn, Lloyd Thompson, Mellon Institute of Industrial Research, Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania. 

Class of 1928 

Abbott, Talbert Ward, Department of Chemistry, Southern Illinois State 
Normal University, Carbondale, Illinois. 

Arvin, James Augustus, Sherwin-Williams Company, Chicago, Illinois. 

Coleman, Gerald Hawley, Dow Chemical Company, Midland, Michigan. 



Department of Chemistry 151 

Coons, Charles Curtis, The Hoover Company, North Canton, Ohio. 

Davies, Letha Allison (Mrs. Robert K. Behr), 531 East Lincoln Avenue, Mt. 
Vernon, New York. 

Gauerke, Chester Gustave, Pittsburgh Plate Glass Company, Milwaukee, Wis- 
consin. 

Hyde, James Franklin, Corning Glass Works, Corning, New York. 

Leslie, Robert Thies, American Petroleum Institute, Washington, D. C. 

Martin, Lawrence Forstall, Southern Regional Research Laboratory, United 
States Department of Agriculture, New Orleans, Louisiana. 

Merchant, Raymond, Lake Village, Indiana. 

Quill, Laurence Larkin, Department of Chemistry, Ohio State University, 
Columbus, Ohio. 

Salzberg, Paul Lawrence, Experimental Station, E. I. du Pont de Nemours 
and Company, Incorporated, Wilmington, Delaware. 

Scroggie, Arthur Galbraith, Rayon Department, E. I. du Pont de Nemours and 
Company, Incorporated, Buffalo, New York. 

Soukup, Roy, Rayon Department, E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Company, In- 
corporated, Richmond, Virginia. 

W'esterman, Beulah Dorothea, Department of Home Economics, University of 
Washington, Seattle, Washington. 

Class of 1929 

Babcock, Dale Friend, Experimental Station, E. I. du Pont de Nemours and 
Company, Incorporated, Wilmington, Delaware. 

Berg, Clarence Peter, Department of Biochemistry, State University of Iowa, 
Iowa City, Iowa. 

Bousquet, Euclid Wilfred, Experimental Station, E. I. du Pont de Nemours 
and Company, Incorporated, Wilmington, Delaware. 

Copley, Michael Joseph, Eastern Regional Research Laboratory, United States 
Department of Agriculture, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Elder, Albert Lawrence, Department of Chemistry, Syracuse University, Syra- 
cuse, New York. 

Ford, Stanley Griffith, Organic Chemicals Department, E. I. du Pont de 
Nemours and Company, Incorporated, Wilmington, Delaware. 

Gunnings, Defoe Childress, Bureau of Standards, Washington, D. C. 

Littman, Edwin Robert, Standard Oil Development Company, Linden, New 
Jersey. 

Lycan, William Hiram, Pittsburgh Plate Glass Company, Milwaukee, Wis- 
consin. 

Reder, Ruth Elizabeth (Mrs. Ruth St. Julian), Department of Home Eco- 
nomics, Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechanical College, Stillwater, Okla- 
homa. 

Sherwood, George Ray, Department of Chemistry, Wayne University, Detroit, 
Michigan. 

Stanley, Wendell Meredith, The Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research, 
Princeton, New Jersey. 

Tschentke, Herman Louis, Universal-Atlas Cement Company, Chicago, Illinois. 

Yohe, Gail Robert, State Geological Survey, Urbana, Illinois. 

Class of 1930 

Bennett, Chester Wallace, Department of Chemistry, Western Illinois State 
Teachers College, Macomb, Illinois. 

Coffman, Donald Drake, Experimental Station, E. I. du Pont de Nemours and 
Company, Incorporated, Wilmington, Delaware. 

Cupery, Martin Eli, Experimental Station, E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Com- 
pany, Incorporated, Wilmington, Delaware. 

Ellis, Ruth Humphrey, Department of Chemistry, Vassar College, Poughkeep- 
sie, New York. 

Friedrich, Martin Edwin Paul, Organic Chemicals Department, E. I. du Pont 
de Nemours and Company, Incorporated, Wilmington, Delaware. 

Gillespie, Horace Beaven, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia Uni- 
versity, New York, New York. 



152 University of Illinois 



Griffith, Esther Meryl, Department of Chemistry, Texas State College for 

Women, Denton, Texas. 
Hussey, Stewart Clark, Electrolux Corporation of New York, Wilmington, 

Delaware. 
King, Edward Peter, Pure Oil Refining Company, Cabin Creek, West Virginia. 
Kurt, Oscar Edward, Ethyl Gasoline Corporation, Baton Rouge, Louisiana. 
Mackey, Bill Harry, Explosives Department, E. I. du Pont de Nemours and 

Company, Incorporated, Wilmington, Delaware. 
Maxwell, Robert William, Experimental Station, E. I. du Pont de Nemours 

and Company, Incorporated, Wilmington, Delaware. 
Moyer, Wendell William, A. E. Staley Manufacturing Company, Decatur, 

Illinois. 
Nichols, William Abner, Deceased. 
Pickett, Lucy Weston, Department of Chemistry, Mt. Holyoke College, South 

Hadley, Massachusetts. 
Rossander, Swanie Siguard, Organic Chemicals Department, E. I. du Pont de 

Nemours and Company, Incorporated, Wilmington, Delaware. 
Scull, Charles Wesler, 7812-A Spring Avenue, Elkins Park, Pennsylvania. 
Sellers, John Alvan, Department of Chemistry, Michigan State Normal Col- 
lege, Ypsilanti, Michigan. 
Shaw, Everett Jesse, A. B. Dick Company, Chicago, Illinois. 
Stearns, Horace Avery, Dow Chemical Company, Midland, Michigan. 
Troxel, Shirley Monroe, Department of Chemistry and Physics, State Teachers 

College, Trenton, New Jersey. 
Walters, Ernest Gardiner, Western Electric Company, Chicago, Illinois. 
Youker, Mortimer Alexander, Organic Chemicals Department, E. I. du Pont de 

Nemours and Company, Incorporated, Wilmington, Delaware. 

Class of 1931 

Ball, Robert William, Patent Division, Legal Department, E. I. du Pont de 
Nemours and Company, Incorporated, Washington, D. C. 

Bliss, Horace Hopkins, Bundy Tubing Company, Detroit, Michigan. 

Bock, Louis Hamilton, Rohm and Haas Company, Incorporated, Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania. 

Boruff, Clair S., Hiram Walker and Sons, Peoria, Illinois. 

Browning, Eugene, Rayonier, Incorporated, Shelton, Washington. 

Davis, Donald Walker, Rayon Department, E. I. du Pont de Nemours and 
Company, Incorporated, Richmond, Virginia. 

Goehler, Orville Eugene, Chemical Warfare Service, Washington, D. C. 

Goodman, John Ben, United States Bureau of Mines, Golden, Colorado. 

Hughes, Gordon, Department of Physics, Alabama Polytechnic Institute, Auburn, 
Alabama. 

Johnson, Earl Hanford, Rayon Department, E. I. du Pont de Nemours and 
Company, Incorporated, Richmond, Virginia. 

Kao, Tsi Yu, National Central University, Chunking, Szechuan, China. 

Neave, Sidney Lionel, Kyuoquot, Vancouver Island, Vancouver, British Co- 
lumbia, Canada. 

Phipps, Harris Eugene, Department of Chemistry, Eastern Illinois State 
Teachers College, Charleston, Illinois. 

Rees, Orin Wainwright, State Geological Survey, Urbana, Illinois. 

Roll, Leslie James, Eastman Kodak Company, Rochester, New York. 

Selwood, Pierce Wilson, Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, 
Evanston, Illinois. 

Shead, Arthur Curtis, Department of Chemistry, University of Oklahoma, 
Norman, Oklahoma. 

Sisson, Wayne Andrew, American Viscose Corporation, Marcus Hook, Penn- 
sylvania. 

Smith, Harold Agnew, Duraloy Company, Scottdale, Pennsylvania. 

Stampfli. Joseph Gail, Eastman Kodak Company, Rochester, New York. 

White, Julius, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland. 



Department of Chemistry 153 

Windus, Wallace, Rohm and Haas Company, Incorporated, Philadelphia, Penn- 
sylvania. 
Zimmer, John Charles, Standard Oil Development Company, Linden, New 

Jersey. 

Class of 1932 
Althausen, Darrell, Northern Regional Research Laboratory, United States 

Department of Agriculture, Peoria, Illinois. 
Becker, Charles Brunner, Columbia Chemical Division, Pittsburgh Plate Glass 

Company, Barberton, Ohio. 
Blomquist, Alfred Theodore, H. M. Stevenson Company, 332 South Michigan, 

Chicago, Illinois. 
Caldwell, Clyde Train, The Upjohn Company, Kalamazoo, Michigan. 
Corrigan, Kenneth Edwin, Harper Hospital, Detroit, Michigan. 
Faith, William Lawrence, Department of Chemical Engineering, Kansas State 

College, Manhattan, Kansas. 
Fisher, Charles Harold, Eastern Regional Research Laboratory, United States 

Department of Agriculture, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Haas, Dorothea, Forty-Eight Insulations, Incorporated, New York, New York. 
Hardy, Vernal Richard, Experimental Station, E. I. du Pont de Nemours and 

Company, Incorporated, Wilmington, Delaware. 
Henry, William Foley, Corn Products Refining Company, Argo, Illinois. 
Hollander, Leonore Beatrice (Mrs. Leonore Kohler), Lindenstrasse 22, Alsbach 

a. d. Bergstrasse, Germany. 
Holloway, Judson Harry, Rayonier, Incorporated, Shelton, Washington. 
Klingelhoefer, William Christian, Solvay Process Company, Syracuse, New 

York. 
McMahon, Edward Merrill, Tennessee Eastman Corporation, Kingsport, Ten- 
nessee. 
Meints, Ralph Edward, National Aniline and Chemical Company, Buffalo, New 

York. 
Munro, Howard Everett, Eastman Kodak Company, Rochester, New York. 
Peirce, Donald Durand, Department of Science, State Teachers College, Clarion, 

Pennsylvania. 
Shildneck, Paul Russell, A. E. Staley Manufacturing Company, Decatur, 

Illinois. 
Stoughton, Roger Wolcott, Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, 

Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee. 
Sweet, Roger Spencer, Department of Chemistry, New Jersey College for 

Women, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey. 
Symons, George Edgar, Buffalo Sewer Authority, Bird Island Laboratory, 

Buffalo, New York. 
Woodruff, Eugene Hurlbut, The Upjohn Company, Kalamazoo, Michigan. 
Yuan, Han Ching, Nantial Central University, Nanking, China. 

Class of 1933 

Bailey, William Fleming, Department of . Chemistry, MacMurray College, 
Jacksonville, Illinois. 

Butz, Lewis William, Bureau of Animal Husbandry, Department of Agricul- 
ture, Beltsville, Maryland. 

Chang, Chin, Chungking University, Chungking, Szechuan, China. 

Chu, Tse-Tsing, Deceased. 

DeVries, John, Department of Chemistry, Calvin College, Grand Rapids, Michi- 
gan. 

Doty, John Roy, Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Louisiana 
State University, New Orleans, Louisiana. 

Duffey, Homer Russell, Vulcan Copper and Supply Company, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Dykins, Fred Alexander, Illinois Division of Highways, Springfield, Illinois. 

Hale, Joseph Baylies, Eastman Kodak Company, Rochester, New York. 

Harmon, Jesse, Experimental Station, E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Company, 
Incorporated, Wilmington, Delaware. 



154 University of Illinois 



Horne, William Henry, F. C. Huyck and Sons, Albany, New York. 

Jukkola, Elmer Ely, United States Air Corps, Wright Field, Dayton, Ohio. 

Klabunde, Walter, R. and H. Chemicals Department, E. I. du Pont de 
Nemours and Company, Incorporated. Niagara Falls, New York. 

Kleiderer, Ervin Carleton, Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, Indiana. 

Knauf, Albert Ensign, Abbott Laboratories, North Chicago, Illinois. 

Koch, Edwin George, Department of Chemistry, University of Tennessee, Knox- 
ville, Tennessee. Now on leave: 65th Ordnance Company, (AM), Fort 
Benning, Georgia. 

Lehman, Milford Rhodes, Los Angeles City College, Los Angeles, California. 

Maclean, Marion Elsie, 647 Cooke Street, Waterbury, Connecticut. 

Mrgudich, John Neil, Burgess Instrument Company, Freeport, Illinois. 

Nelson, Harlan Willis, School of Mineral Industries, Pennsylvania State Col- 
lege, State College, Pennsylvania. 

Page, John Orion, Kroger Food Foundation, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Saddington, Arthur Ward, Solvay Process Company, Syracuse, New York. 

Scott, Robert Ashmore, Department of Chemistry, Southern Illinois State 
Normal University, Carbondale, Illinois. 

Sohl, William Edward, Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing Company, St. 
Paul, Minnesota. 

Tarvin, Donald, General Chemical Company, Long Island City, New York. 

Thompson, Carl Denison, Carbide and Carbon Chemicals Corporation, South 
Charleston, West Virginia. 

Tsao, June Chien-Yu (Mrs. Li), West Great Street, Kiang-Yin, Kiang-Su, 
China. 

Wahl, Milton Heins, Explosives Department, E. I. du Pont de Nemours and 
Company, Incorporated, Gibbstown, New Jersey. 

Werner, Charles Orville, American Viscose Corporation, Marcus Hook, Penn- 
sylvania. 

Class of 1934 

Babcock, Sidney Henry, Department of Chemistry, College of Agriculture, 
University of California, Davis, California. 

Balthis, Joseph Hendrickson, Jr., Experimental Station, E. I. du Pont de 
Nemours and Company, Incorporated, Wilmington, Delaware. 

Barr, Frank Thomas, Standard Oil Development Company, Linden, New Jersey. 

Brown, Marshall Herbert, Experimental Station, E. I. du Pont de Nemours 
and Company, Incorporated, Wilmington, Delaware. 

Bull, Benton Alexander, Ames, Thiess, Olson, and Mecklenburger, 77 West 
Washington Street, Chicago, Illinois. 

Burton, Alvin Ackerman, Standard Oil Company of California, Berkeley, 
California. 

Carter, Herbert Edmund, Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois, 
Urbana, Illinois. 

Chien, Shih Liang, National University of Peking, Peping, China. 

Conard, Vera Arrietta (Mrs. Wilbur I. Patterson), Arlington Laboratories, 
Chagrin Falls, Ohio. 

Deem, Arden Garrell, Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois, Urbana, 
Illinois. 

Eaton, James Tucker, E. F. Houghton and Company, Philadelphia, Pennsyl- 
vania. 

Ellingboe, Ellsworth Knowlton, Experimental Station, E. I. du Pont de 
Nemours and Company, Incorporated, Wilmington, Delaware. 

Ewart, Roswell Horr, United States Rubber Company, Passaic, New Jersey. 

Frederick, Donald Sherwood, Rohm and Haas Company, Incorporated, Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania. 

Gallagher, Milton, Joseph E. Seagram and Sons, Louisville, Kentucky. 

Ginsburg, Harold Marion, Deceased. 

Goebel, Max Theodore John, Grasselli Chemicals Department, E. I. du Pont 
de Nemours and Company, Incorporated, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Gray, Arzy Robert, Tennessee Eastman Corporation, Kingsport, Tennessee. 

Hayden, Henrietta Snow, Harper Hospital, Detroit, Michigan. 



. Department of Chemistry 155 

Holmes, Donald Fletcher, Experimental Station, E. I. du Pont de Nemours and 

Company, Incorporated, Wilmington, Delaware. 
Jackson, Arnold Osborne, G. W. Carnrick Company, Newark, New Jersey. 
Li, Ching Chen, Anhwei University, Anking, Anhwei, China. 
Loring, Hubert Scott, Department of Chemistry, Leland Stanford University, 

Stanford University, California. 
Meyers, Earl Lawrence, United States Food and Drug Administration, St. 

Louis, Missouri. 
Murray, Linwood Asa, Jr., United States Rubber Products Company, Passaic, 

New Jersey. 
Nicholson, Douglas Gillison, Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois, 

Urbana, Illinois. 
Parsons, Theophilus, Jr., Organic Chemicals Department, E. I. du Pont de 

Nemours and Company, Incorporated, New Brunswick, New Jersey. 
Patterson, Wilbur Irvin, General Biochemicals, Incorporated, Chagrin Falls, 

Ohio. 
Pearce, Dennis Wiffen, Department of Chemistry, Purdue University, Lafay- 
ette, Indiana. 
Pezold, Margaret Antoinette (Mrs. E. C. Kleiderer), 3504 Meridian Street, 

Indianapolis, Indiana. 
Searle, Norman Edward, Experimental Station, E. I. du Pont de Nemours and 

Company, Incorporated, Wilmington, Delaware. 
Simpson, Oliver Cecil, Laboratory of Molecular Physics, Carnegie Institute of 

Technology, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 
Woodward, Charles Frank, Eastern Regional Research Laboratory, United 

States Department of Agriculture, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Class of 1935 

Ashley, Warren Cotton, Pyroxylin Products, Incorporated, Chicago, Illinois. 

Bartz, Quentin Royal, Parke-Davis and Company, Detroit, Michigan. 

Behrens, Otto Karl, Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, Indiana. 

Bradley, William Frank, State Geological Survey, Urbana, Illinois. 

Clark, Alfred, Battelle Memorial Institute, Columbus, Ohio. 

Clemens, John Ewart, Standard Oil Development Company, Linden, New 
Jersey. 

Copenhaver, John William, Rohm and Haas Company, Incorporated, Brides- 
burg, Pennsylvania. 

Dobry, Laddie Francis, Johnson and Johnson, Chicago, Illinois. 

Eck, John Clifford, White Laboratories, Incorporated, Newark, New Jersey. 

Gibbs, Carlin Frary, The B. F. Goodrich Company, Akron, Ohio. 

Hanford, William Edward, Experimental Station, E. I. du Pont de Nemours 
and Company, Incorporated, Wilmington, Delaware. 

McCarty, Charles Norman, Department of Chemistry, Michigan State College, 
East Lansing, Michigan. 

McCoy, Richard Hugh, Department of Chemistry, University of Pittsburgh, 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 

Mertz, Edwin Theodore, Department of Agricultural Chemistry, University of 
Missouri, Columbia, Missouri. 

Meyer, Curtis Erdmund, Simpson Memorial Institute, University of Michigan, 
Ann Arbor, Michigan. 

Naeser, Charles Rudolph, Department of Chemistry, George Washington Uni- 
versity, Washington, D. C. 

Reed, James Burbank, Frankford Arsenal, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Riegel, Ernest Byron, Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, 
Evanston, Illinois. 

Schniepp, Lester Edward, Organic Chemicals Department, E. I. du Pont de 
Nemours and Company, Incorporated, Wilmington, Delaware. 

Schreiber, Richard Seyforth, Experimental Station, E. I. du Pont de Nemours 
and Company, Incorporated, Wilmington, Delaware. 

Shields, John Bickford, Department of Animal Nutrition, University of Illinois, 
Urbana, Illinois. 



156 University of Illinois 



Spealman, Max Lang, Old Hickory Chemical Company, Old Hickory, Tennessee. 

Teeters, Wilber Otis, The Barrett Company, Edgewater, New Jersey. 

Thurston, Jack Theo, American Cyanamid Company, Stamford, Connecticut. 

Van Arendonk, Arthur M., Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, Indiana. 

West, Donald Haven, Department of Physical Science, Chicago Teachers Col- 
lege, Chicago, Illinois. 

Womack, Madelyn, Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois, Urbana, 
Illinois. 

Class of 1936 

Alexander, Lee Linsley, Organic Chemicals Division, E. I. du Pont de Nemours 
and Company, Incorporated, Wilmington, Delaware. 

Bixler, Milo Everett, The Hoover Company, North Canton, Ohio. 

Coe, Wesley Stuart, Naugatuck Chemical Division, United States Rubber Com- 
pany, Naugatuck, Connecticut. 

Condo, Fred Elmer, Grasselli Chemicals Department, E. I. du Pont de Nemours 
and Company, Incorporated, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Cooke, Thomas Gaunt, Deceased. 

Eppstein, Samuel H., The Upjohn Company, Kalamazoo, Michigan. 

Farley, Eugene Dodson, Standard Oil Company of New Jersey, Elizabeth, 
New Jersey. 

Fierke, Scheuring Session, Eastman Kodak Company, Rochester, New York. 

Ford, Jared Hewes, Kilgore Development Corporation, Washington, D. C. 

Friedman, Bernard Samuel, Universal Oil Products Company, Chicago, Illinois. 

Gring, John Lukins, General Electric Company, Pittsfield, Massachusetts. 

Gunther, James Kenneth, Swift and Company, Chicago, Illinois. 

Hancock, Evelyn Margaret, Department of Chemistry, Columbia University, 
New York, New York. 

Hendricks, James Owen, Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing Company, St. 
Paul, Minnesota. 

Hiatt, Gordon Dale, Eastman Kodak Company, Rochester, New York. 

Hsing, Chi-Yi, 21 Shiao Tsanig Fang Husing, Peking, China. 

Hully, Hugh Henry, Organic Chemicals Department, E. I. du Pont de 
Nemours and Company, Incorporated, Wilmington, Delaware. 

Johnson, Robert, Emery Industries, Incorporated, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 

Kemmerer, Kenneth Stanley, Mead Johnson Company, Evansville, Indiana. 

Kolloff, Harold Garrett, The Upjohn Company, Kalamazoo, Michigan. 

Leffler, Marlin Templeton, Abbott Laboratories, North Chicago, Illinois. 

Morris, Rupert Clark, Shell Development Company, Emeryville, California. 

Reynolds, Dexter Harold, Thomas and Hochwalt Laboratories, Monsanto 
Chemical Company, Dayton, Ohio. 

Schaad, John A., Department of Physical Science, Herzl Junior College, Chi- 
cago, Illinois. 

Scribner, Leonard R., Fansteel Metallurgical Corporation, North Chicago, 
Illinois. 

Smith, Albert F., Experimental Station, E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Com- 
pany, Incorporated, Wilmington, Delaware. 

Sparks, Meredith Pleasant (Mrs. William J. Sparks), Calco Division, Ameri- 
can Cyanamid Company, Bound Brook, New Jersey. 

Sparks, William Joseph, Standard Oil Development Company, Linden, New 
Jersey. 

Sterrett, Robert Rhorer, Naugatuck Chemical Division, United States Rubber 
Company, Naugatuck, Connecticut. 

Class of 1937 

Arnold, Richard Thomas, Department of Chemistry, University of Minnesota, 

Minneapolis, Minnesota. 
Beckwith, Merton Monroe, J. B. Ford Company, Wyandotte, Michigan. 
Brown, James Howard, Oldbury Electro-Chemical Company, Niagara Falls, 

New York. 
Burtle, Jerome George, Western Cartridge Company, Alton, Illinois. 



Department of Chemistry 157 

Campbell, Raymond Warner, Deceased. 

Cary, Roderick Charles, Rohm and Haas Company, Incorporated, Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania. 

Cross, James Martin, General Aniline Works, New York, New York. 

Damschroder, Rudolph Everett, Eastman Kodak Company, Rochester, New 
York. 

Drake, Lewis Royal, Dow Chemical Company, Midland, Michigan. 

Fessler, William Alfred, Solvay Process Company, Solvay, New York. 

Fisher, Henry Benedict, Darco Experimental Laboratory, Wilmington, Dela- 
ware. 

Foster, Henry Dorroh, Experimental Station, E. I. du Pont de Nemours and 
Company, Incorporated, Wilmington, Delaware. 

Gruber, Elbert Egidius, The B. F. Goodrich Company, Akron, Ohio. 

Holland, William Ernest, Central Soya Company, Decatur, Indiana. 

Huffman, Eugene Harvey, Department of Chemistry, Kansas State College, 
Manhattan, Kansas. 

Kearby, Kenneth Karl, Standard Oil Development Company, Linden, New 
Jersey. 

Krebs, Robert William, Standard Oil Company of Louisiana, Baton Rouge, 
Louisiana. 

Larson, Thurston Eric, State Water Survey, Urbana, Illinois. 

Lawrenz, Margaret, Department of Animal Nutrition, University of Illinois, 
Urbana, Illinois. 

Leppla, Paul Warren, Continental Can Company, Chicago, Illinois. 

McGrew, Frank Clifton, Experimental Station, E. I. du Pont de Nemours and 
Company, Incorporated, Wilmington, Delaware. 

Meyer, Lillian Hoagland (Mrs. C. E. Meyer), Department of Home Eco- 
nomics, Wayne University, Detroit, Michigan. 

Miller, Richard Froman, Eastman Kodak Company, Rochester, New York. 

Nesty, Glenn Albert, Solvay Process Company, Syracuse, New York. 

Paik, Arthur John, Merck and Company, Rahway, New Jersey. 

Parker, Edward Arthur, A. Kenneth Graham and Associates, Jenkintown, 
Pennsylvania. 

Pinkney, Paul Swithin, Experimental Station, E. I. du Pont de Nemours and 
Company, Incorporated, Wilmington, Delaware. 

Ross, William Ernest, Shell Development Company, Emeryville, California. 

Roy, Max Ferdinand, Department of Chemistry, Brown University, Providence, 
Rhode Island. 

Ruberg, Leone Anne (Mrs. Harry M. Duvall), Organic Chemicals Department, 
E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Company, Incorporated, Wilmington, Dela- 
ware. 

Ryden, Laurence Leland, Dow Chemical Company, Midland, Michigan. 

Seifert, Ralph Louis Edwin, Department of Chemistry, Alma College, Alma, 
Michigan. 

Shenk, John Henry, Department of Chemistry, Kansas State College, Manhat- 
tan, Kansas. 

Smith, Janice Minerva, Department of Home Economics, Pennsylvania State 
College, State College, Pennsylvania. 

Stiegman, Clarence Albert, Oldbury Electro-Chemical Company, Niagara Falls, 
New York. 

Todd, Henry Russell, American Can Company, Maywood, Illinois. 

Upton, Wilson Vincent, National Starch Products, Incorporated, New York, 
New York. 

Weinstock, Harry Herschel, Jr., National Oil Products Company, Harrison, 
New Jersey. 

Wende, Charles William Joseph, Experimental Station, E. I. du Pont de 
Nemours and Company, Incorporated, Wilmington, Delaware. 

West, Harold Dadford, Department of Biochemistry, Meharry Medical College, 
Nashville, Tennessee. 

Wolthuis, Enno, General Aniline Works, New York, New York. 



158 University of Illinois 



Class of 1938 

Anderson, John, Shell Development Company, Emeryville, California. 

Black, Howard Charles, Swift and Company, Chicago, Illinois. 

Briggs, Ben Thoburn, Rayonier, Incorporated, Shelton, Washington. 

Brown, George Bosworth, Department of Chemistry, School of Medicine, 
Cornell University, New York, New York. 

Butterbaugh, Darrell J., Rohm and Haas Company, Incorporated, Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania. 

Cole, John Wayne, The Glidden Company, Chicago, Illinois. 

Cowan, John Charles, Northern Regional Research Laboratory, United States 
Department of Agriculture, Peoria, Illinois. 

Denoon, Clarence England, Experimental Station, E. I. du Pont de Nemours 
and Company, Incorporated, Wilmington, Delaware. 

Eddy, Charles Roland, Eastern Regional Research Laboratory, United States 
Department of Agriculture, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Eilerman, George Edward, Pittsburgh Plate Glass Company, Milwaukee, Wis- 
consin. 

Finger, Glenn Charles, State Geological Survey, Urbana, Illinois. 

Fleming, Charles LeRoy, Jr., Standard Oil Development Company, Linden, New 
Jersey. 

Getz, Charles Albert, Cardox Corporation, Chicago, Illinois. 

Glavis, Frank John, Rohm and Haas Company, Incorporated, Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania. 

Gross, Siegfried Theodore, Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois, 
Urbana, Illinois. 

Henry, Robert Edwin, Continental Can Company, Chicago, Illinois. 

Jeanes, Allene Rosalind, Northern Regional Research Laboratory, United 
States Department of Agriculture, Peoria, Illinois. 

Johanson, Alva Joseph, Department of Chemistry, Brigham Young University, 
Provo, Utah. 

Joyce, Robert Michael, Experimental Station, E. I. du Pont de Nemours and 
Company, Incorporated, Wilmington, Delaware. 

Keyser, Louis Schroer, Rayonier, Incorporated, Shelton, Washington. 

Kirkpatrick, Edward Crane, Ammonia Department, E. I. du Pont de Nemours 
and Company, Incorporated, Wilmington, Delaware. 

Lundquist, William Emil, Experimental Station, E. I. du Pont de Nemours 
and Company, Incorporated, Wilmington, Delaware. 

McReynolds, James Peyton, Department of Chemistry, Ohio State University, 
Columbus, Ohio. 

Marklein, Bernard Charles, Department of Chemistry, Lafayette College, 
Easton, Pennsylvania. 

Middleton, Errol Bathurst, Department of Chemistry, Agricultural and Me- 
chanical College of Texas, College Station, Texas. 

Rice, Eldon Emerson, Swift and Company, Chicago, Illinois. 

Schieltz, N. Cyril, Department of Chemistry, Colorado School of Mines, 
Golden, Colorado. 

Sutherland, Harry Kennon, Shell Development Company, Emeryville, Cali- 
fornia. 

Taebel, Wilbert August, Westinghouse Electric and Manufacturing Company, 
Bloomfield, New Jersey. 

Tanner, Louise Pickens (Mrs. F. W. Tanner), 803 West Michigan, Urbana, 
Illinois. 

Tenney, Horace Marion, Standard Oil Development Company, Baton Rouge, 
Louisiana. 

Tyler, Willard Philip, The B. F. Goodrich Company, Akron, Ohio. 

Ullyot, Glenn Edgar, Smith, Kline, and French Company, Philadelphia, Penn- 
sylvania. 

Van Campen, John Hamilton, Eastman Kodak Company, Rochester, New York. 



Department of Chemistry 159 

Class of 1939 

Butler, Sister Mary Josetta, Department of Chemistry, St. Xavier College, 
Chicago, Illinois. 

Cairns, Theodore LeSueur, Experimental Station, E. I. du Pont de Nemours 
and Company, Incorporated, Wilmington, Delaware. 

Chapin, John Hitchcock, Ammonia Department, E. I. du Pont de Nemours 
and Company, Incorporated, Charleston, West Virginia. 

Claussen, Walter Frederick, The Texas Company, Beacon, New York. 

Cundy, Paul Franklin, Department of Chemistry, Virginia Junior College, 
Virginia, Minnesota. 

Dial, William Richard, Columbia Chemicals Division, Pittsburgh Plate Glass 
Company, Barberton, Ohio. 

Dunlap, Lawrence Hallowell, Armstrong Cork Company, Lancaster, Penn- 
sylvania. 

Eubank, Lowell Depp, Grasselli Chemicals Department, E. I. du Pont de 
Nemours and Company, Incorporated, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Fugate, Wesley Orlean, The Barrett Company, Edgewater, New Jersey. 

Glass, Dudley Brewer, Eastman Kodak Company, Rochester, New York. 

Gray, Hugh William, Experimental Station, E. I. du Pont de Nemours and 
Company, Incorporated, Wilmington, Delaware. 

Greenlee, Sylvan Owen, Devoe and Raynolds Company, Incorporated, Louis- 
ville, Kentucky. 

Handler, Philip, Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Duke Uni- 
versity, Durham, North Carolina. 

Hanke, Albert Robert, Krebs Pigment and Color Corporation, E. I. du Pont 
de Nemours and Company, Incorporated, Newark, New Jersey. 

Hicks, Russell Lowell, National Aniline and Chemical Company, Buffalo, New 
York. 

Johnson, Alfred Anton, Experimental Station, E. I. du Pont de Nemours and 
Company, Incorporated, Wilmington, Delaware. 

Kleinberg, Jacob, Department of Chemistry, James Millikin University, Decatur, 
Illinois. 

Levesque, Charles Louis, Rohm and Haas Company, Incorporated, Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania. 

Matson, Edward John, Abbott Laboratories, North Chicago, Illinois. 

May, Robert Lee, Sinclair Refining Company, Chicago, Illinois. 

McBurney, Charles Hamilton, Rohm and Haas Company, Incorporated, Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania. 

Meadors, Victor Gerald, Naugatuck Chemical Company, United States Rubber 
Company, Naugatuck, Connecticut. 

Melville, Donald Burton, Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, 
Cornell University, New York, New York. 

Moon, Neil Sennett, Eastman Kodak Company, Rochester, New York. 

Mueller, Max Best, The Barrett Company, Edgewater, New Jersey. 

Peppard, Donald Francis, Department of Chemistry, Illinois Institute of Tech- 
nology, Chicago, Illinois. 

Peppel, William Jennings, Experimental Station, E. I. du Pont de Nemours 
and Company, Incorporated, Wilmington, Delaware. 

Rhodes, Herbert Dawson, Standard Oil Company of Indiana, Whiting, Indiana. 

Robinson, John Wendell, Jr., Grasselli Chemicals Department, E. I. du Pont 
de Nemours and Company, Incorporated, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Rollinson, Carl Linden, Grasselli Chemicals Department, E. I. du Pont de 
Nemours and Company, Incorporated, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Sample, James Halverson, Department of Chemistry, Indianapolis Central Col- 
lege, Indianapolis, Indiana. 

Sharp, Alvin George, Experimental Station, E. I. du Pont de Nemours and 
Company, Incorporated, Wilmington, Delaware. 

Sisler, Harry Hall, Department of Chemistry, University of Kansas, Lawrence, 
Kansas. 

Spence, Roderick Wharley, Department of Chemistry, College of Pharmacy, 
University of Illinois, Chicago, Illinois. 



160 University of Illinois 



Sullivan, Virgil Richard, Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois, 

Urbana, Illinois. 
Sveda, Michael, Grasselli Chemicals Department, E. I. du Pont de Nemours 

and Company, Incorporated, Cleveland, Ohio. 
Swain, Ansel Parrish, Hillman Hospital, Birmingham, Alabama. 
Turnbull, David, Jr., Department of Chemistry, Case School of Applied Science, 

Cleveland, Ohio. 
Wager, Ralph Waldo, Department of Horticulture, University of Illinois, 

Urbana, Illinois. 
Williams, Loring Rider, Department of Chemistry, University of Nevada, Reno, 

Nevada. 
Williams, William Wilson, Organic Chemicals Department, E. I. du Pont de 

Nemours and Company, Incorporated, Wilmington, Delaware. 
Wolf, Donald Edwin, Merck and Company, Rahway, New Jersey. 

Class of 1940 
Baker, Bernard Randall, Lederle Laboratories, Pearl River, New York. 
Becker, Harry Carroll, The Texas Company, Beacon, New York. 
Berger, Arthur, E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Company, Incorporated, 

Charlestown, Indiana. 
Brimm, Eugene Oscar, Linde Air Products Company, Tonawanda, New York. 
Byman, Leonard, Department of Chemical Engineering, Princeton University, 

Princeton, New Jersey. 
Clark, Harry Murray, Keystone Steel and Wire Company, Peoria, Illinois. 
Clark, Joe Haller, Eastman Kodak Company, Rochester, New York. 
Cooke, Harold Groves, Jr., Pittsburgh Plate Glass Company, Milwaukee, Wis- 
consin. 
Corse, Joseph Walters, Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis, Indiana. 
Dankert, Lester John, Dow Chemical Company, Midland, Michigan. 
Darbyshire, Richard Wayne, Pennsylvania Salt Manufacturing Company, 

Wyandotte, Michigan. 
Dec, Joseph, Eastman Kodak Company, Rochester, New York. 
Dobratz, Elmer Henry, Monsanto Chemical Company, St. Louis, Missouri. 
Downing, Joseph Richard, Experimental Station, E. I. du Pont de Nemours 

and Company, Incorporated, Wilmington, Delaware. 
Duke, Frederick Robert, Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois, 

Urbana, Illinois. 
Egly, Richard Samuel, Commercial Solvents Corporation, Terre Haute, Indiana. 
Ginsberg, Emanuel, Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois, Urbana, 

Illinois. 
Gold, Marvin Harold, Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, 

Evanston, Illinois. 
Grillot, Gerald Francis, Department of Chemistry, University of Kentucky, 

Lexington, Kentucky. 
Holley, Charles Elmer, Jr., Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois, 

Urbana, Illinois. 
Horning, Evan Charles, Department of Chemistry, University of Michigan, 

Ann Arbor, Michigan. 
Howe, Eugene Everett, Merck and Company, Rahway, New Jersey. < , 

Keller, Raymond Nevoy, Department of Chemistry, University of Wisconsin, 

Madison, Wisconsin. 
Kornblum, Nathan, Department of Chemistry, Oberlin College, Oberlin, Ohio. 
Kott, Arthur Edwin, Western Electric Company, Chicago, Illinois. 
Krebs, Karl Frederick, Bakelite Corporation, Bloomfield, New Jersey. 
Leslie, Ruth Elizabeth, Department of Home Economics, University of Texas, 

Austin, Texas. 
Long, Robert Sidney, Calco Chemical Division, American Cyanamid Company, 

Bound Brook, New Jersey. 
Markunas, Peter Charles, Commercial Solvents Corporation, Terre Haute, 

Indiana. 



Department of Chemistry 161 

McKeever, Charles Harlan, Rohm and Haas, Company, Incorporated, Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania. 

Miller, Matthew William, Rohm and Haas, Company, Incorporated, Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania. 

Nichols, Velma E., American Cyanamid Company, Stamford, Connecticut. 

O'Shaughnessy, Marion Thomas, Jr., Rayon Department, E. I. du Pont de 
Nemours and Company, Incorporated, Buffalo, New York. 

Pearson, Donald Emanuel, Pittsburgh Plate Glass Company, Milwaukee, Wis- 
consin. 

Preising, Sister Mary Joan, St. Francis Convent, Joliet, Illinois. 

Risser, William Christian, Abbott Laboratories, North Chicago, Illinois. 

Roach, Paul Gordon, Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois, Urbana, 
Illinois. 

Robinson, James Vance, Rayon Department, E. I. du Pont de Nemours and 
Company, Incorporated, Buffalo, New York. 

Ross, Sydney, Department of Chemistry, Leland Stanford University, Stanford 
University, California. 

Rowan, Robert, Jr., Department of Chemistry, Texas Technological College, 
Lubbock, Texas. 

Scott, Samuel LeRoy, Experimental Station, E. I. du Pont de Nemours and 
Company, Incorporated, Wilmington, Delaware. 

Shafer, William McKinley, Department of Physical Science, Iowa State 
Teachers College, Cedar Falls, Iowa. 

Singh, Bhagat, American Gas Association Testing Laboratory, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Sprules, Francis James, National Oil Products Company, Harrison, New Jersey. 

Teeter, Howard Maple, Department of Chemistry, Bradley Polytechnic Insti- 
tute, Peoria, Illinois. 

Wood, Thomas Ross, Department of Chemistry, Radcliffe College, Cambridge, 
Massachusetts. 

Class of 1941 (through June) 

Anderson, Arthur William, Plastics Department, E. I. du Pont de Nemours 
and Company, Incorporated, Arlington, New Jersey. 

Armstrong, Marvin Douglas, Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, 
Cornell University, New York, New York. 

Arnett, Lyda McClellen, Jr., Experimental Station, E. I. du Pont de Nemours 
and Company, Incorporated, Wilmington, Delaware. 

Behr, Lyell Christian, Department of Chemistry, University of Minnesota, 
Minneapolis, Minnesota. 

Bicek, Edward John, Tracy, Minnesota. 

Bond, Howard Wissler, Bureau of Standards, Washington, D. C. 

Bottorff, Edmond Milton, Rohm and Haas Company, Incorporated, Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania. 

Briggs, Stanford William, Gulf Research and Development Company, Pitts- 
burgh, Pennsylvania. 

Brooks, Lester Allen, Sprague Specialty Company, North Adams, Massa- 
chusetts. 

Burney, Donald Eugene, Standard Oil Company of Indiana, Whiting, Indiana. 

Deacon, Benjamin Dimmick, Stratford, Ontario, Canada. 

Denton, Jack Joe, Calco Chemical Division, American Cyanamid Company, 
Bound Brook, New Jersey. 

Dietz, Frederick Curt, General Aniline Works, New York, New York. 

Harkema, James, General Aniline Works, New York, New York. 

Harmison, Charles Rice, Jr., Department of Physical Chemistry, Medical 
School, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts. 

Kade, Charles Frederick, Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois, 
Urbana, Illinois. 

Kaplan, Julius Frank, Edwal Laboratories, Chicago, Illinois. 

Keirs, Russell John, Continental Can Company, Chicago, Illinois. 

Kell, Robert Warren, National Aluminate Company, Chicago, Illinois. 

Kelton, Stanton Coit, Jr., Rohm and Haas Company, Incorporated, Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania. 



162 University of Illinois 



Kern, Stanley Felix, Celanese Corporation, Cumberland, Maryland. 
Kretschmer, Carl Bernard, 1110 East Eighth Street, Pueblo, Colorado. 
Krohn, Ivar Trygve, 721 Erie Street, S. E. Minneapolis, Minnesota. 
Land, Anthony Hamilton, Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois, 

Urbana, Illinois. 
Lindsey, Richard Vernon, Jr., Experimental Station, E. I. du Pont de Nemours 

and Company, Incorporated, Wilmington, Delaware. 
McMillan, Graham Watson, Commercial Solvents Corporation, Terre Haute, 

Indiana. 
Michels, Lloyd Richard, 227 Twenty Fourth Avenue, San Francisco, California. 
Moffett, Robert Bruce, Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, 

Evanston, Illinois. 
O'Brien, Thomas Doran, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D. C. 
Patterson, Lawrence Arthur, Mallinckrodt Chemical Company, St. Louis, 

Missouri. 
Rapp, Betty, Phillips Petroleum Company, Bartlesville, Oklahoma. 
Richter, Frederick Paul, United States Rubber Products Company, Detroit, 

Michigan. 
Riddle, Edward Hollister, Rohm and Haas Company, Incorporated, Phila- 
delphia, Pennsylvania. 
Rieger, William Holley, Reilly Tar and Chemical Company, Indianapolis, In- 
diana. 
Rouse, Prince Earl, Jr., Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois, 

Urbana, Illinois. 
Rugg, Frank McLeran, Bakelite Corporation, Bloomfield, New Jersey. 
Sauer, Robert Olvin, General Electric Company, Schenectady, New York. 
Shackleton, John William, Plastics Department, E. I. du Pont de Nemours 

and Company, Incorporated, Arlington, New Jersey. 
Shannon, William John, Department of Chemistry, Iowa State College, Ames, 

Iowa. 
Sharkey, William Henry, Experimental Station, E. I. du Pont de Nemours 

and Company, Incorporated, Wilmington, Delaware. 
Sperati, Carleton Angelo, Plastics Department, E. I. du Pont de Nemours 

and Company, Incorporated, Arlington, New Jersey. 
Stevens, Carl Mantle, Department of Chemistry, School of Medicine, Cornell 

University, New York, New York. 
Taylor, William Henry, Jr., Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D. C. 
Upson, Robert William, Experimental Station, E. I. du Pont de Nemours and 

Company, Incorporated, Wilmington, Delaware. 
Walton, Warren Lewis, Experimental Station, Hercules Powder Company, 

Wilmington, Delaware. 
Wearn, Richard Benjamin, Eastman Kodak Company, Rochester, New York. 
Welch, Eldred, General Aniline Works, New York, New York. 
Whitehill, Lynwood Nelson, Department of Chemistry, Cornell University, 

Ithaca, New York. 
Witte, Michael, National Aniline and Chemical Company, Buffalo, New York.